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View Full Version : How To Cedar Line Your Closet



Pale Rider
04-18-2008, 09:55 PM
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2364/2423718521_03c20a18da_o.jpg


http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/how-to/intro/0,,20187465,00.html

manu1959
04-18-2008, 10:05 PM
i have done this to every closet in my house......i love it.....

glockmail
04-20-2008, 08:57 PM
Does it lose its smell after a while?

manu1959
04-20-2008, 09:03 PM
every year or two you hit it with some sand paper and it comes back to life.....

glockmail
04-20-2008, 09:08 PM
Like, 150 grit? Or coarser?

manu1959
04-20-2008, 09:10 PM
nah....i just use 200 and only in the places i can get to without moving anything......don't want dust all over everything.....actually the first year it is kind of overpowering....and if you do it wear a good mask.....the dust is brutal

glockmail
04-20-2008, 09:16 PM
nah....i just use 200 and only in the places i can get to without moving anything......don't want dust all over everything.....actually the first year it is kind of overpowering....and if you do it wear a good mask.....the dust is brutal With 200 you're just taking off a very thin layer. That's great! I've been putting of doing this because no one has been able to answer that simple question. Thanks!

Pale Rider
04-20-2008, 10:00 PM
i have done this to every closet in my house......i love it.....

Very cool! I plan on doing this in the house I'm buying in Montana. Wondered about the smell too, thanks. Either way, I think it looks awesome.

glockmail
04-20-2008, 10:04 PM
I think I'll just run a band between the upper and lower shelves. That way I won't have to take anything off the walls. It will save a lot of trim work too.

manu1959
04-20-2008, 10:51 PM
I think I'll just run a band between the upper and lower shelves. That way I won't have to take anything off the walls. It will save a lot of trim work too.

i just did the walls there was "plenty" of smell......oh And my great grand mother taught me how to reactivate here cedar lined chest......each spring she would take everything out and use emrey cloth to activate the chest....

Pale Rider
04-21-2008, 12:08 AM
i just did the walls there was "plenty" of smell......oh And my great grand mother taught me how to reactivate here cedar lined chest......each spring she would take everything out and use emrey cloth to activate the chest....

I wonder how that works... just a little sanding. Is the odor only millimeters deep?

manu1959
04-21-2008, 12:28 AM
I wonder how that works... just a little sanding. Is the odor only millimeters deep?

as i understand it dust and dirt reseal the cedar......so when you sand that layer off it lets the smell out again which i belive is contained in the natural oils in the wood......

Pale Rider
04-21-2008, 09:41 AM
as i understand it dust and dirt reseal the cedar......so when you sand that layer off it lets the smell out again which i belive is contained in the natural oils in the wood......

Yeah... makes sense to me. It's just nice to know that you can rejuvenate it. Of all the $100K+ plus tools I have, one thing I've never owned is a nail gun. Might have to invest in one of those for this job. Maybe a cheapie from Harbor Freight tools or something, because I'll probably use it for this and then never again.

Did you use a nail gun manu, or did you go back over each and ever nail with a nail punch set to sink it?

glockmail
04-21-2008, 09:54 AM
Why not glue the stuff on?

Pale Rider
04-21-2008, 10:48 AM
Why not glue the stuff on?

You absolutely use glue... but you nail it too. You can see in the pictures above there's glue on the piece the guy is putting on... step #4...

manu1959
04-21-2008, 11:18 AM
Yeah... makes sense to me. It's just nice to know that you can rejuvenate it. Of all the $100K+ plus tools I have, one thing I've never owned is a nail gun. Might have to invest in one of those for this job. Maybe a cheapie from Harbor Freight tools or something, because I'll probably use it for this and then never again.

Did you use a nail gun manu, or did you go back over each and ever nail with a nail punch set to sink it?

nail gun.....no glue......if you ever need to remove it ... if it is glued on you destroy the gypsum board so you would get to redo that as well.....

nail guns are only necessary if you have to nail two pieces of wod together.....

glockmail
04-21-2008, 12:14 PM
You absolutely use glue... but you nail it too. You can see in the pictures above there's glue on the piece the guy is putting on... step #4...


nail gun.....no glue......if you ever need to remove it ... if it is glued on you destroy the gypsum board so you would get to redo that as well.....

nail guns are only necessary if you have to nail two pieces of wod together.....
I've had great luck with using glue only for projects. I finished a basement one time by gluing styrofoam right onto the block walls, then gluing drywall onto the foam. No nail holes to mud over.

My contention is that if you plan on removing the cedar then why put it up in the first place?

manu1959
04-21-2008, 01:45 PM
I've had great luck with using glue only for projects. I finished a basement one time by gluing styrofoam right onto the block walls, then gluing drywall onto the foam. No nail holes to mud over.

My contention is that if you plan on removing the cedar then why put it up in the first place?

why get dressed then you are just going to take your clothes off later...

glockmail
04-21-2008, 02:08 PM
why get dressed then you are just going to take your clothes off later...
:laugh2:

I grew up in an old house, circa 1930, and there were several places on the walls that had removable panels to access plumbing, in case a pipe leaked. Back in those days walls were "three layer" plaster over oak lath. Cutting a hole in a wall and repairing it was a big deal.

Later on in life, working on homes built after the development and acceptance of gypsum board, I learned a different philosophy. "Drywall" is considered a finish material, and is easily removed and replaced. If there is a problem with plumbing then you just rip into the wall and repair it later.

Its just two different philosophies of design and renovation.

Pale Rider
04-21-2008, 04:02 PM
nail gun.....no glue......if you ever need to remove it ... if it is glued on you destroy the gypsum board so you would get to redo that as well.....

nail guns are only necessary if you have to nail two pieces of wod together.....
Well a nail gun would sink the nail deep enough so that it wouldn't interfere with the tongue and groove. If you're using a hammer, you'd have to go back and use a punch to set the nail or it would be in the way, since you're supposed to put the nail in near the tongue so that it's hidden when you're done.


:laugh2:

I grew up in an old house, circa 1930, and there were several places on the walls that had removable panels to access plumbing, in case a pipe leaked. Back in those days walls were "three layer" plaster over oak lath. Cutting a hole in a wall and repairing it was a big deal.

Later on in life, working on homes built after the development and acceptance of gypsum board, I learned a different philosophy. "Drywall" is considered a finish material, and is easily removed and replaced. If there is a problem with plumbing then you just rip into the wall and repair it later.

Its just two different philosophies of design and renovation.
And I agree glock. I'd glue it up. Expansion and contraction from the home getting warm and cool might loosen up some of the boards over time. If they're glued, they're staying put. I wouldn't ever plan on taking it out. If I did, well, no big deal to rip out the dry wall and slap up new stuff. A closet would be a piece of cake.