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LiberalNation
03-24-2007, 04:42 PM
This has just been a sad story all around since it began. The coverup was pretty low down though.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070324/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/tillman_friendly_fire;_ylt=Av_QQyoEhxYn1mz90epHve6 yFz4D

WASHINGTON - Nine officers, including up to four generals, should be held accountable for missteps in the aftermath of the friendly fire death of Army Ranger Pat Tillman in Afghanistan, a Pentagon investigation will recommend.

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Senior defense officials said Friday the Defense Department inspector general will cite a range of errors and inappropriate conduct as the military probed the former football star's death on the battlefront in 2004, said one defense official.

The official, who like the others requested anonymity because the Army has not publicly released the information, said it appears senior military leaders may not have had all the facts or worked hard enough to get the facts of what happened on April 22, 2004, when Tillman was killed by members of his own platoon.

Dozens of soldiers those immediately around Tillman at the scene of the shooting, his immediate superiors and high-ranking officers at a command post nearby knew within minutes or hours that his death was fratricide.

Even so, the Army persisted in telling Tillman's family he was killed in a conventional ambush, including at his nationally televised memorial service 11 days later. It was five weeks before his family was told the truth, a delay the Army has blamed on procedural mistakes.

The latest investigation has focused on how high up the chain of command it was known that Tillman's death was caused by his own comrades. Officers from the rank of colonel and up will be blamed in the report, according to one officer who has been informed of the findings.

According to the officials, the report will not make charges or suggest punishments, but it will recommend the Army look at holding the nine officers accountable.

One defense official said it appears the inspector general will not conclude there was an orchestrated cover-up in the investigation.

Tillman's father, Pat, said Friday he had no intention of commenting on the inspector general's report until he had heard an Army briefing on Monday. That day, the Army plans to release the report and a second related to the killing.

The other report is by the Army Criminal Investigation Command, which will focus on whether a crime, such as negligent homicide, was committed when Tillman's own men shot him. One defense official said it appears the investigation did not find any criminal intent in the shooting.

Tillman's case drew worldwide attention in part because he had turned down a multimillion-dollar contract to play defensive back for the Arizona Cardinals in order to join the Army Rangers after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

The report's release comes with the Bush administration under fire from the public and Congress for the war in Iraq. Though the Afghanistan conflict has not drawn nearly so much criticism, the report could add to the drumbeat of negative stories the administration has had to endure over the treatment of wounded soldiers and the long deployments of U.S. troops.

To date, the Army has punished seven people for the Tillman killing, but no one was court-martialed. Four soldiers received relatively minor punishments under military law, ranging from written reprimands to expulsion from the Rangers. One had his pay reduced and was effectively forced out of the Army.

The Army, which requested the inspector general review last year, said in a statement released Friday that it "plans to take appropriate actions after receiving the inspector general's report."

The officials declined to name any of the officers the report will implicate. The commander of Tillman's 75th Ranger Regiment was Col. James C. Nixon. Last year he was named director of operations at the Center for Special Operations at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.

Nixon knew within about two days that Tillman's death was fratricide, another officer involved in the investigations told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

Previous investigations of the case have focused on the facts of the incident and sought to answer questions of whether it was a fratricide.

The report's findings were first reported on Friday by CBS News.

Tillman died in Afghanistan's Paktia province, along the Pakistan border, after his platoon was ordered to split into two groups and one of the units began firing. Tillman and an Afghan with him were killed. A specialist at the time of his death, he was posthumously promoted to corporal.

Since the incident, the Army has moved to improve the notification procedures and now requires an officer to review initial casualty information and verify that the families have been told the best, accurate information.

mundame
03-26-2007, 11:07 AM
This has just been a sad story all around since it began. The coverup was pretty low down though.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070324/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/tillman_friendly_fire;_ylt=Av_QQyoEhxYn1mz90epHve6 yFz4D

WASHINGTON - Nine officers, including up to four generals, should be held accountable for missteps in the aftermath of the friendly fire death of Army Ranger Pat Tillman in Afghanistan, a Pentagon investigation will recommend.


Pretty inevitable, I think, considering how much fuss was made over Tillman's enlisting.

But the Army is evidently gaining sophistication that coverups NEVER work, including all the many, many atrocities that our out-of-control troops have indulged in. They cannot be hidden in this Internet, instant worldwide communications day. So the Army is communicating this forcibly to their officers and men, looks like.

Good.

Our reputation has been ruined around the world by all these atrocities and smarmy coverups.

darin
03-26-2007, 12:02 PM
WASHINGTON - Nine officers, including up to four generals, should be held accountable for missteps in the aftermath of the friendly fire death of Army Ranger Pat Tillman in Afghanistan, a Pentagon investigation will recommend.



What's wrong with you? It's Not they are blamed in his death - it's in the stuff after. Doesn't mean anyone did anything wrong; but made perhaps honest mistakes.

I bet you won't be happy until EVERY US Soldier is dead, or in prison.

glockmail
03-26-2007, 12:57 PM
Sounds like more piling on to discredit our soldiers. :slap:

gabosaurus
03-26-2007, 03:05 PM
Tillman was killed by friendly fire, then the whole thing was covered up.
Certainly not of that was the fault of the military, and anyone who believes so hates the troops.
More parrot squawking by parrot heads. :lame2:

Gaffer
03-26-2007, 04:19 PM
He was killed in a friendly fire incident. It was not done maliciously. And in most cases if its covered up it's out of respect for the soldier. Better he be remember as a hero fighting than having been hit by his own troops.

It's obvious mundame has never served or even know anyone that is serving or she would not feel that way about the troops.

mundame if the troops are so bad I suggest you go to iran and throw yourself on the mercy of the qods.

gabosaurus
03-26-2007, 05:35 PM
He was killed in a friendly fire incident. It was not done maliciously. And in most cases if its covered up it's out of respect for the soldier. Better he be remember as a hero fighting than having been hit by his own troops.

That is one of the most ridiculous pieces of garbage bullsh*t I have ever heard. Thanks for thinking anyone would believe such nonsense.

stephanie
03-26-2007, 05:39 PM
That is one of the most ridiculous pieces of garbage bullsh*t I have ever heard. Thanks for thinking anyone would believe such nonsense.

What's ridiculous to me...

Is you and others, would rather use this brave soldier who died severing his country..
As a way to spew your hatred for the military and your country..

Sick..

gabosaurus
03-26-2007, 05:44 PM
Stepho, that made no sense at all. As usual. Keep drinking the Bush Kool-Aid. :cheers2:

Gaffer
03-26-2007, 05:56 PM
Stepho, that made no sense at all. As usual. Keep drinking the Bush Kool-Aid. :cheers2:

And you keep praying to allah.

Hobbit
03-27-2007, 12:56 AM
That is one of the most ridiculous pieces of garbage bullsh*t I have ever heard. Thanks for thinking anyone would believe such nonsense.

http://www.debatepolicy.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=110&stc=1&d=1174971397

Psychoblues
03-27-2007, 11:20 PM
Pat's mother, who is intensely interested in the truth, says that the Army, the Pentagon and the White House refuse to release pertinent information to her and so far most of what they have released to her has been lies. No doubt about that staged, rehearsed and very choreographed fancy national funeral, the silver star and all of that were all lies and misrepresentations. Pat's mama says that, too.

I think the soldiers and their families deserve better than that.

gabosaurus
03-28-2007, 01:02 PM
The Pentagon brass are not interested in what happened to Tillman or any other dead American soldier. They are interested in good public relations. American dead might as well be a pile of worthless chicken bones. The Iraq conflict is about politics and making sure the Bushies don't have to admit they screw up. It's all a bloodbath and the Bushies are modeling their new swimwear.

grunt
03-29-2007, 09:46 AM
What a bunch of morons we have on this board.

The "cover-up" by the US Army was out of respect, not malice. Friendly fire accidents have happened in every war ever fought and will happen in every war fought in the future. You "LIEberals" on this board run around pulling shit out of your ass to justify an agenda that our enemies have sworn to uphold. And that is to discredit EVERYTHING this great nation stand for. "The US is emperical", "The US opresses the people of the world", "The US Military is full of thugs who just want to kill people". etc etc. What sorry, miserable lives you all must have. I mean having to live in a country so corrupt.

Please, if the US was so fucking bad, you and your ilk would have been shot years ago. The Middle East would have been turned into "Mini-America" decades ago. This forum would not exist. Understand? I doubt you whiny-bleeding-heart-fuck-tards do, but hey, I tried.

grunt
03-29-2007, 09:54 AM
The Pentagon brass are not interested in what happened to Tillman or any other dead American soldier. They are interested in good public relations. American dead might as well be a pile of worthless chicken bones. The Iraq conflict is about politics and making sure the Bushies don't have to admit they screw up. It's all a bloodbath and the Bushies are modeling their new swimwear.

A bloodbath? You, maam, have no idea what you are talking about. Unless of course you're "bloodbath" was in reference to the insurgent moo-slums being obliterated around every corner? Bloodbath? Ask the Marines of Iwo Jima what a "bloodbath" is. Ask the 101st of Normandy what a "bloodbath" is.


Moron.

Mr. P
03-29-2007, 10:48 AM
A bloodbath? You, maam, have no idea what you are talking about. Unless of course you're "bloodbath" was in reference to the insurgent moo-slums being obliterated around every corner? Bloodbath? Ask the Marines of Iwo Jima what a "bloodbath" is. Ask the 101st of Normandy what a "bloodbath" is.


Moron.

Yea pinned the tail on that JackASS! :salute:

grunt
03-29-2007, 10:58 AM
Yea pinned the tail on that JackASS! :salute:


lol. It's easy to nail the weak minded. :coffee:

glockmail
03-29-2007, 12:37 PM
What a bunch of morons we have on this board.

The "cover-up" by the US Army was out of respect, not malice. Friendly fire accidents have happened in every war ever fought and will happen in every war fought in the future. You "LIEberals" on this board run around pulling shit out of your ass to justify an agenda that our enemies have sworn to uphold. And that is to discredit EVERYTHING this great nation stand for. "The US is emperical", "The US opresses the people of the world", "The US Military is full of thugs who just want to kill people". etc etc. What sorry, miserable lives you all must have. I mean having to live in a country so corrupt.

Please, if the US was so fucking bad, you and your ilk would have been shot years ago. The Middle East would have been turned into "Mini-America" decades ago. This forum would not exist. Understand? I doubt you whiny-bleeding-heart-fuck-tards do, but hey, I tried.

This behavior is all in line with Evan's theory: http://www.debatepolicy.com/showpost.php?p=31921&postcount=1

Kathianne
03-30-2007, 06:15 PM
Tillman was killed by friendly fire, then the whole thing was covered up.
Certainly not of that was the fault of the military, and anyone who believes so hates the troops.
More parrot squawking by parrot heads. :lame2:

I don't think so. While THIS particular article/headline tries to make it for political purposes, all it illustrates is that a week afterward, the 'officers' had been willing to say, "Probable" and try to warn the CIC, though there is nothing to say it made it to that level, (per the article). What IS obvious, is that by this time the concern and investigation had made it up to the level of 4 star general, the message conveys that the investigation was ONGOING:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070330/ap_on_re_us/tillman_friendly_fire


AP: Gen. tried to warn Bush on Tillman

By SCOTT LINDLAW, Associated Press Writer 1 minute ago

Just seven days after Pat Tillman's death, a top general warned there were strong indications that it was friendly fire and President Bush might embarrass himself if he said the NFL star-turned-soldier died in an ambush, according to a memo obtained by The Associated Press.

It was not until a month afterward that the Pentagon told the public and grieving family members the truth that Tillman was mistakenly killed in Afghanistan by his comrades.

The memo reinforces suspicions that the Pentagon was more concerned with sparing officials from embarrassment than with leveling with Tillman's family. How exactly it 'conveys' that instead of ongoing investigation and warning of 'probable outcome', the writer does not expound upon.

In a memo sent to a four-star general a week after Tillman's April 22, 2004, death, then-Maj. Gen. Stanley McChrystal warned that it was "highly possible" the Army Ranger was killed by friendly fire. McChrystal made it clear his warning should be conveyed to the president.

"I felt that it was essential that you received this information as soon as we detected it in order to preclude any unknowing statements by our country's leaders which might cause public embarrassment if the circumstances of Cpl. Tillman's death become public," McChrystal wrote on April 29, 2004, to Gen. John Abizaid, head of Central Command.

White spokesman Blain Rethmeier said Friday that a review of records turned up no indication that the president had received McChrystal's warning. Bush made no reference to the way Tillman died in a speech delivered two days after the memo was written. But Rethmeier emphasized that the president often pays tribute to fallen soldiers without mentioning the exact circumstances of their deaths.

The family was not told until May 29, 2004, what really happened. In the intervening weeks, the military continued to say Tillman died under enemy fire, and even awarded him the Silver Star, which is given for heroic battlefield action.

The Tillman family has charged that the military and the Bush administration deliberately deceived his relatives and the nation to avoid turning public opinion against the war.

Tillman's mother, Mary, had no immediate comment Friday on the newly disclosed memo.

The memo was provided to the AP by a government official who requested anonymity because the document was not released as part of the Pentagon's official report into the way the Army brass withheld the truth. McChrystal was the highest-ranking officer accused of wrongdoing in the report, issued earlier this week.

In the memo, McChrystal expressed concern that Bush and acting Army Secretary Les Brownlee might give speeches in which they misstated the facts about Tillman's death.

A former spokesman for Abizaid did not immediately return phone and e-mail messages.

As for Brownlee, he told investigators he did not recall learning Tillman was killed by his fellow Rangers until several weeks after the fact. He did not discuss the matter with the White House, he told investigators.

A spokesman for McChrystal said he had no comment.

McChrystal was, and still is, commander of the Joint Special Operations Command, head of "black ops" forces. He has since been promoted to lieutenant general. Abizaid was in charge of American forces in the Middle East and Central Asia.

In his memo, McChrystal said he had heard Bush and Brownlee "might include comments about Cpl. Tillman's heroism and his approved Silver Star medal in speeches currently being prepared, not knowing the specifics surrounding his death."

McChrystal said he expected an investigation under way "will find that it is highly possible Cpl. Tillman was killed by friendly fire."

At the same time, McChrystal said: "The potential that he might have been killed by friendly fire in no way detracts from his witnessed heroism or the recommended personal decoration for valor in the face of the enemy."

On Monday, the Pentagon released the findings of an investigation into the circumstances of Tillman's death, and into whether the military covered them up.

The investigators recommended that nine Army officers, including McChrystal, be held accountable for errors in reporting the friendly fire death to their superiors and to Tillman's family. McChrystal was found "accountable for the inaccurate and misleading assertions" contained in papers recommending Tillman get the Silver Star.

Some of the officers involved said they wanted to wait until the investigations were complete before informing the Tillman family.

The latest document obtained by the AP suggests that officials at least as high as Abizaid knew the truth weeks before the family.

Tillman was killed after his Army Ranger comrades were ambushed in eastern Afghanistan. Rangers in a convoy trailing Tillman's group had just emerged from a canyon where they had been fired upon. They saw Tillman and mistaken fired on him.

The White House has been careful not to wade into the circumstances of Tillman's death. The day after Tillman died, a spokesman said Tillman "was an inspiration on and off the football field," but made no reference to the specifics of the episode.

In a speech given two days after McChrystal's memo, Bush made no mention of how Tillman died.

"The loss of Army Cpl. Pat Tillman last week in Afghanistan brought home the sorrow that comes with every loss, and reminds us of the character of the men and women who serve on our behalf," Bush said at the White House Correspondents' Dinner.