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logroller
05-16-2011, 10:57 PM
I'm building, well actually rebuilding, an outdoor kitchen because the last one, made out of wood, got dry rot and termites. So my brother-in-law and I, after splitting a six pack, thought we'd go ahead and demolish the old. Now its time to rebuild, this time with steel. I've worked extensively with wood but never steel. Everybody I talked to says "Oh its the same thing", but its not. I start asking them questions about details on cantelevered bar, if it reinforces through a double stud and/or notched track and they look at me with a blank stare. Either I'm way off, or I've yet to talk with someone who's done more than just frame an interior wall. Is there anybody who's built an outdoor kitchen island that may have some tips, ideally pictures, I'd be extremely grateful.

fj1200
05-17-2011, 06:34 AM
First of all the nails won't work. ;)

Can't you get any tips from where you picked up the studs?

logroller
05-17-2011, 11:10 AM
First of all the nails won't work. ;)

Can't you get any tips from where you picked up the studs?

If a hammer won't work, use duct tape:laugh:

I asked, but they're pretty much clueless. I asked about the size of screws, coatings for outdoor use...nothing. Just blank stares.
In retrospect I wish I would of kicked down for a DVD how to from bbqcoach.com, but the videos I've seen from them have this goofball voice that drives me crazy, so I refrained. Call me petty and stubborn; I suppose I'll do it the old-fashioned way--learn by doing! It'll come out OK, I'll just end up spending more over-building.

fj1200
05-17-2011, 11:19 AM
If a hammer won't work, use duct tape:laugh:

I asked, but they're pretty much clueless. I asked about the size of screws, coatings for outdoor use...nothing. Just blank stares.
In retrospect I wish I would of kicked down for a DVD how to from bbqcoach.com, but the videos I've seen from them have this goofball voice that drives me crazy, so I refrained. Call me petty and stubborn; I suppose I'll do it the old-fashioned way--learn by doing! It'll come out OK, I'll just end up spending more over-building.

Where did you get them from? That might be half the problem right there. I found this for you.

http://www.bbqgrillsandislands.com/tips-on-building-an-island/
An excerpt:

Framing with Galvanized Steel Studs
1. Do not use wood (fire hazard) or interior galvanized steel studs that are available at the big box stores. Interior galvanized steel studs are too thin and do not have enough galvanization to hold up for exterior use.
2. Purchase 20 gauge, galvanized 60 steel studs commercially. It’s best if you use both stud and track, since the track allows the studs to slip inside for perpendicular assembly.

Why not use concrete block? You probably don't need to be very good at setting block depending on what you're covering it with.

logroller
05-18-2011, 03:22 AM
Where did you get them from? That might be half the problem right there. I found this for you.

http://www.bbqgrillsandislands.com/tips-on-building-an-island/
An excerpt:


Why not use concrete block? You probably don't need to be very good at setting block depending on what you're covering it with.

I got the right studs(20g, galv60), its the details of joinery I need help with. Figured out a lot today, and hopefully I'll get more done thursday (got rained out after getting the base done and all the studs cut.) It's working out OK, wish I had a chop saw though; I'm wasting through is carbide blades on the radial. I could use abrasive disks but the sparks risk damaging the wood table. Oh well, at $13 a piece its a drop in the bucket.

I didn't do block b/c the existing foundation was shallow at 6-8", no rebar and wont support the weight of solid grout block, a requirment for structures. Add to that there's a wedding in the yard on June 11, so there isn't time for the filled block to cure(~28days) before applying stucco. It would still stick, but would show the grout lines--too tacky for a $6000 project. So given the time constraint alone, I'm stuck with steel, 1/2" durock and acriflex one coat stucco. Still debating on what type of vapor barrier to use. On the sides it probably doesn't matter, but on the horizontal surfaces I'm leaning towards Tyvek due to availability, but I'm not sure about it's heat resistance.

fj1200
05-18-2011, 08:19 AM
I got the right studs(20g, galv60), its the details of joinery I need help with. Figured out a lot today, and hopefully I'll get more done thursday (got rained out after getting the base done and all the studs cut.) It's working out OK, wish I had a chop saw though; I'm wasting through is carbide blades on the radial. I could use abrasive disks but the sparks risk damaging the wood table. Oh well, at $13 a piece its a drop in the bucket.

I didn't do block b/c the existing foundation was shallow at 6-8", no rebar and wont support the weight of solid grout block, a requirment for structures. Add to that there's a wedding in the yard on June 11, so there isn't time for the filled block to cure(~28days) before applying stucco. It would still stick, but would show the grout lines--too tacky for a $6000 project. So given the time constraint alone, I'm stuck with steel, 1/2" durock and acriflex one coat stucco. Still debating on what type of vapor barrier to use. On the sides it probably doesn't matter, but on the horizontal surfaces I'm leaning towards Tyvek due to availability, but I'm not sure about it's heat resistance.

I see, I'm surprised the vendor isn't more helpful but I'm sure you'll get it all straight. Is it like wood where if you're unsure just add more nails? :laugh:

Why would you need a vapor barrier on an exterior structure? esp. on the top? Depends on what's going on top I suppose.

logroller
05-20-2011, 03:09 AM
I
Why would you need a vapor barrier on an exterior structure? esp. on the top? Depends on what's going on top I suppose.

It's not what's on top, its what's on the inside. To save a little cost, $200 vs $2000, I've not gone with an outdoor-rated refrigerator; so, I need to keep it as dry as possible (though I may upgrade down the road and have built the opening to standard dimensions, 24"x34.5"). After having seen how much water made it through the last countertop, I'm taking every reasonable precaution. Call it $100 worth of peace of mind; same goes for the 20g studs @12" spacing.

I tend to over-build, over-think... over-everything I suppose. But my work is rock-solid--- That's how I came up with my Landscape Co name-- rock on landscaping. That's my true passion, I simply love nature and the outdoors, that's why I love BBQ so much. I'd sleep outside if I could. Oh yea, I'm going camping this weekend, man-trip :happy0100::alcoholic::cheers2:.

fj1200
05-20-2011, 08:33 AM
It's not what's on top, its what's on the inside.

I was just thinking that moisture would get everywhere regardless because it's outside but it's good insurance nonetheless, as long as you let moisture escape that is.

What material are you going with for countertop? I tried to make a sample of a concrete counter once... dismal failure but you probably have better skills than me in that area, it wouldn't be hard to top my efforts. :laugh:

logroller
05-20-2011, 11:14 AM
I was just thinking that moisture would get everywhere regardless because it's outside but it's good insurance nonetheless, as long as you let moisture escape that is.

What material are you going with for countertop? I tried to make a sample of a concrete counter once... dismal failure but you probably have better skills than me in that area, it wouldn't be hard to top my efforts. :laugh:

Ceramic tile, possibly glazed: 12" field, 6" bullnose and maybe 6" diagonal with medallion insets on backsplash. I've not been impressed with concrete countertops, too porous, requiring regular sealing; especially when outdoors. I guess if your goin' modernist it works, but I personally find it too industrial for suburbia. So far as skill, I'm no concrete pro, the number of shims required to level the frame on my current project is testiment to that:laugh:
I hate concrete work. I had a line I'd always tell customers when they asked me if I did it or after a repair for a broken pipe from a stake:"The only thing I hate more than concrete work are concrete workers.":poke:

Alexandro
01-18-2012, 03:06 AM
Man,i did a google search the other day for furniture.I found one site from there.I have entered this site and find some interesting things there.Good works in home kitchen cabinets.This is really helpful to take nice ideas to make your home kitchen more beautiful.I will be next time post that site name here.This will be helpful for you.

logroller
01-20-2012, 02:41 AM
Man,i did a google search the other day for furniture.I found one site from there.I have entered this site and find some interesting things there.Good works in home kitchen cabinets.This is really helpful to take nice ideas to make your home kitchen more beautiful.I will be next time post that site name here.This will be helpful for you.

Oh really...for an outdoor kitchen built with steel studs??? I have my doubts, but link away.

Jackson0
12-29-2012, 02:36 AM
Today i want to say that it is really nice and informative tips which is really useful and practicable u use it its really work you must try it....

glockmail
12-31-2012, 02:27 PM
I'm an expert with steel studs, but for an outdoor kitchen I'd suggest using masonry. Galvanized steel on a concrete patio with nearly constant moisture contact isn't going to last long (you're better off going with treated wood in that case). Also, you'll need some type of exterior sheathing to complete the walls.