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kowalskil
10-03-2011, 09:50 PM
How did Stalin manage to outmaneuver so many




After reading an interesting, and rather unique, book about Stalin, I just posted a very short review of it, at the Amazon’s website. Here it is, for those who might be interested:


I agree with those who wrote that Montefiore's voluminous "Stalin: The Court of the Red Tsar" is not always easy reading. But it is certainly worthwhile for the light it sheds on relations between Stalin and his close subordinates, those whom he liquidated and those who survived him. Stalin's methods of domination--both brutal and ideological--are skillfully described. The same applies to personal relations between communist leaders. The Soviet Union was the first country in which the idea of proletarian dictatorship, formulated by Marx, was implemented. That is why all aspects of Soviet history are worth studying. Be aware that the number of characters is unusually large. Fortunately, Stalin's family tree and the introductory section entitled "List of Characters" should help readers to deal with this problem.


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Ludwik Kowalski (see Wikipedia), author of “Diary of a Former Communist: Thoughts, Feelings, Reality.”

http://csam.montclair.edu/~kowalski/life/intro.html

This free on-line autobiography is based on a diary kept between 1946 and 2004 (in the USSR, Poland, France and the USA).

Gunny
10-05-2011, 01:44 AM
How did Stalin manage to outmaneuver so many





After reading an interesting, and rather unique, book about Stalin, I just posted a very short review of it, at the Amazon’s website. Here it is, for those who might be interested:


I agree with those who wrote that Montefiore's voluminous "Stalin: The Court of the Red Tsar" is not always easy reading. But it is certainly worthwhile for the light it sheds on relations between Stalin and his close subordinates, those whom he liquidated and those who survived him. Stalin's methods of domination--both brutal and ideological--are skillfully described. The same applies to personal relations between communist leaders. The Soviet Union was the first country in which the idea of proletarian dictatorship, formulated by Marx, was implemented. That is why all aspects of Soviet history are worth studying. Be aware that the number of characters is unusually large. Fortunately, Stalin's family tree and the introductory section entitled "List of Characters" should help readers to deal with this problem.


========================================

Ludwik Kowalski (see Wikipedia), author of “Diary of a Former Communist: Thoughts, Feelings, Reality.”

http://csam.montclair.edu/~kowalski/life/intro.html (http://csam.montclair.edu/%7Ekowalski/life/intro.html)

This free on-line autobiography is based on a diary kept between 1946 and 2004 (in the USSR, Poland, France and the USA).

Stalin was a paranoid, brutal and ruthless dictator who murdered more of his own people than the Nazi's did. What's to understand? I don't see that it is worth studying simply because it was the first country to use a failed form of government,

The US and its current government are however another story .....