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Shadow
07-16-2012, 08:58 AM
It's a daily occurrence now.

The girl on the treadmill next to you at the gym gets a call, and you're suddenly learning more than you ever wanted to know about last night's party.
That guy on the light rail playing Angry Birds Space at full volume apparently doesn’t know that mute buttons or headphones exist.

And then there are all those texting zombies on the sidewalk who seem to be on a collision course with you and your large latte!
Are you guilty of using gadgets inconsiderately in public and "over-sharing" details of your private life?
Of course not. It's those 9 out of 10 other Americans who are the problem.

According to the 2012 Intel Mobile Etiquette Survey, 92 percent of adults in the U.S. wish others practiced better mobile etiquette in public.
Cynics will point out that respondents in surveys like this are being hypocritical. I think it shows that most people have good intentions. They just unintentionally fall into bad mobile behavior.

Smartphones and tablets put phenomenal technology at your fingertips. When you see an incoming message or a call from your spouse or one of your kids, you respond because it could be important. Family comes first in your life. But remember: That's also true of the person on the phone in the next seat who seems rude to you.

It's a good idea for all gadget users to take a step back once in a while and examine how our digital habits are affecting others.
Please consider these Komando 10 Commandments for daily digital manners:


Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2012/07/15/10-commandments-for-mobile-manners/#ixzz20n2PK5Wk

Kathianne
07-16-2012, 09:17 AM
I abhor those that send and receive texts when visiting, it's rude. I've one friend now that when she does that, I get online and read. When she's off, I say, "Just a minute, this is really important." She's doing less of it lately. ;)

Shadow
07-16-2012, 09:49 AM
I abhor those that send and receive texts when visiting, it's rude. I've one friend now that when she does that, I get online and read. When she's off, I say, "Just a minute, this is really important." She's doing less of it lately. ;)


I agree I have one friend that when we go out to lunch...he is contstantly checking facebook. Apparently it's really important that he doesn't miss out on any of his other friends daily 'drama'. I am mean though...I take his phone away. ;)

mundame
07-16-2012, 10:20 AM
Question for your opinion, then:

I don't use cell phones.

However, I have gotten addicted to audiobooks, and I garden and housework with my Bose earphones on (they're large, and block out other sound a little; you can still hear if someone speaks to you).

Lately, ahem, I've taken to wearing them at the local supermarket. Listening to a book while I'm picking out apples and cans of kidney beans. I take them off when I go to the deli counter or the checkout lane so people can talk to me there.

Is that weird, to shop with earphones on?

Tyr-Ziu Saxnot
07-16-2012, 10:35 AM
I have a home computer, a laptop and a simple older model cell phone. I do not need anymore electronic headaches and often consider that I should be reading more books. However politics have my keen interests now so this site which allows for much more free speech than most other sites serves my purpose well. Still , I have about 200 books in my library to get around to reading! Having bought most of them in the last 6 /7 months. With me collecting books is surely an addiction. One that I've found no reason to give up! It is just that I have a 40 year long rule that I must read every book that I collect or else why collect it? Electronics gadgets save time but also if too in love with them they often start to consume more time than they save.. -Tyr

jimnyc
07-16-2012, 10:42 AM
This is what I'm buying when I get the money... It's a device that will allow you to kill cell phone connections! I want to be able to turn this thing on when I arrive at red lights and see the idiot next to me blabbing on the phone. Or at the gym, on line at Dunkin Donuts - or just to mess with my wife! Follow the link afterwards to see MUCH more powerful devices. It's against FCC regs I believe, unless you have a permit I believe.

http://www.gurl.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Cell-Phone-Jammer-CigaretteBox-9ShopKami.jpg


http://www.phonejammer.com/home.php?cat=249

Kathianne
07-16-2012, 01:27 PM
Question for your opinion, then:

I don't use cell phones.

However, I have gotten addicted to audiobooks, and I garden and housework with my Bose earphones on (they're large, and block out other sound a little; you can still hear if someone speaks to you).

Lately, ahem, I've taken to wearing them at the local supermarket. Listening to a book while I'm picking out apples and cans of kidney beans. I take them off when I go to the deli counter or the checkout lane so people can talk to me there.

Is that weird, to shop with earphones on?

I can't do audio books, because of severe hearing loss I've never really been able to follow audio, without visual cues. However, I have huge earphones with additional volume controls that I use both with tv and MP3. Totally wireless and yes, I do use them when walking and shopping. I really don't like to talk to strangers. LOL!

logroller
07-16-2012, 01:41 PM
I can't do audio books, because of severe hearing loss I've never really been able to follow audio, without visual cues. However, I have huge earphones with additional volume controls that I use both with tv and MP3. Totally wireless and yes, I do use them when walking and shopping. I really don't like to talk to strangers. LOL!
With people blabbing on their phones, severe hearing loss may have its benefits.:thumb:
So far as e-books, I miss the manual flipping of pages; a swipe just doesn't give me the same reference.

Kathianne
07-16-2012, 01:49 PM
With people blabbing on their phones, severe hearing loss may have its benefits.:thumb:
So far as e-books, I miss the manual flipping of pages; a swipe just doesn't give me the same reference.

Oh, I love my Kindle!

logroller
07-16-2012, 01:58 PM
Oh, I love my Kindle!
For entertainment I've no issue; but reference-wise, like when I go back and forth, comparing and contrasting points, it just doesn't jive for me. I can read articles, even court cases and what not; but for in depth analysis my brain just doesn't process it right...I'm a tactile learner though. Just seeing something its in one eye and out the other. (I love changing proverbs) :laugh:

Kathianne
07-16-2012, 02:07 PM
For entertainment I've no issue; but reference-wise, like when I go back and forth, comparing and contrasting points, it just doesn't jive for me. I can read articles, even court cases and what not; but for in depth analysis my brain just doesn't process it right...I'm a tactile learner though. Just seeing something its in one eye and out the other. (I love changing proverbs) :laugh:

Different strokes. I've always been visual learner, no surprise there. :laugh2:

As I've gotten older, I'm amazed at just what I accomplished. While it was my mom's strong voice that taught me to speak fairly well, it was my ability to lip read that contributed to my vocabulary, that and reading the dictionary. LOL!

Remember back in jr and sr. high, riding in your Mustang and singing songs? I was always a show stopper with my friends, I totally made up my own lyrics, based upon what I heard. Quite scary!

mundame
07-16-2012, 02:24 PM
For entertainment I've no issue; but reference-wise, like when I go back and forth, comparing and contrasting points, it just doesn't jive for me. I can read articles, even court cases and what not; but for in depth analysis my brain just doesn't process it right...I'm a tactile learner though. Just seeing something its in one eye and out the other. (I love changing proverbs) :laugh:

I use the Kindle app on the iPad and the great thing is you can get hundreds of samples free from Amazon and when ready to read one, just buy it after a test-drive first on the first chapter.

And it has a built-in dictionary and for harder words there are app dictionaries and you can immediately look up stuff on the Web, and also follow every novel and every history on Maps. I've been jumping back and forth from the Shetland islands (Sacrifice, by S.J. Bolton) to Tasmania and Acapulco (Without Warning by John Birmingham) and the amount of geography one can learn painlessly this way is amazing. Also you can walk around on Street View --- I walked all over Fetlar, Shetland, yesterday, which has no trees and hardly any buildings, and it was wonderful. You can see everything, even the people and the cars and the sheep --- someday someone will write a mystery about someone seen in a Google Map view who wasn't supposed to be there at that time.......

SassyLady
07-16-2012, 11:31 PM
I still believe my ex-husband's crackberry was the first step towards our divorce.