PDA

View Full Version : Busy hands are happy hands.



Binky
10-07-2012, 12:22 PM
Over the last several weeks I've taken up canning as a hobby, so to speak. But it can be an expensive endeavor. However, once the supplies are bought and the action in the kitchen takes place, my mind and hands are in a much better mood. They move in positive directions, fulfulling the goal of filling the jars. The family, as picky as they can be, are in love with the lucious foods I am canning. I've not only managed to can a stewed tomato mix of celery, onions and garlic, but moved into the realm of exstacy when I see the gorgeous colors and experience the scents of various foods. Pickled watermelon rines, bread and butter pickles, a broccoli/caulif mix, caulifl and onions, wax and green bean mix, gr. beans alone, asparagus, kiwi jam, strawberry jam, strawberry/rhubarb jam, plum jam, pickled beets, salsa, and more. I have a bit more to can and then moving into another scent, that of which is baking fresh bread. The thought of that reminds me of when my mom used to bake it and the neighbor kids would come and want some. The scent of it emmanating from the oven floating around the house, is one way of experiencing Heaven. Amd then there's the homemade chilli I make that I'm wanting to can as well.

A happy mind, busy hands and movin' bones are things that make for a busy, funfilled day. Better to use them, than to let them sit growing stale, stagnant and stiff. :coffee:

Tyr-Ziu Saxnot
10-07-2012, 01:12 PM
Over the last several weeks I've taken up canning as a hobby, so to speak. But it can be an expensive endeavor. However, once the supplies are bought and the action in the kitchen takes place, my mind and hands are in a much better mood. They move in positive directions, fulfulling the goal of filling the jars. The family, as picky as they can be, are in love with the lucious foods I am canning. I've not only managed to can a stewed tomato mix of celery, onions and garlic, but moved into the realm of exstacy when I see the gorgeous colors and experience the scents of various foods. Pickled watermelon rines, bread and butter pickles, a broccoli/caulif mix, caulifl and onions, wax and green bean mix, gr. beans alone, asparagus, kiwi jam, strawberry jam, strawberry/rhubarb jam, plum jam, pickled beets, salsa, and more. I have a bit more to can and then moving into another scent, that of which is baking fresh bread. The thought of that reminds me of when my mom used to bake it and the neighbor kids would come and want some. The scent of it emmanating from the oven floating around the house, is one way of experiencing Heaven. Amd then there's the homemade chilli I make that I'm wanting to can as well.

A happy mind, busy hands and movin' bones are things that make for a busy, funfilled day. Better to use them, than to let them sit growing stale, stagnant and stiff. :coffee:

That brings back MEMORIES TO ME OF ALL THE CANNING MY GRANDMOTHER DID . I remember going to her house and enjoying the many things she had canned. All were great except the beets, I hated them.
Her canned fruits were to die for. My mother could never match my grandmother at canning or at cooking and my mom was a truly great cook herself. She had to be , she cooked for 13 people, 11 kids , she and my dad! -Tyr

SassyLady
10-07-2012, 09:55 PM
We were just talking this evening about pressure cookers and how our moms and grandmothers used them everyday. It seems like my grandmother never left the kitchen .... I don't remember her being anywhere but in the kitchen or church.

gabosaurus
10-07-2012, 11:17 PM
Guess it depends on how your hands are kept busy. :cool:

Binky
10-08-2012, 11:30 AM
That brings back MEMORIES TO ME OF ALL THE CANNING MY GRANDMOTHER DID . I remember going to her house and enjoying the many things she had canned. All were great except the beets, I hated them.
Her canned fruits were to die for. My mother could never match my grandmother at canning or at cooking and my mom was a truly great cook herself. She had to be , she cooked for 13 people, 11 kids , she and my dad! -Tyr

First of all, let me say I love your avatar and the phrase, "Execute all the traitors," that you have. We could begin with Jane Fonda, but then, that's another thread. LOLOLOLOL!

My mom didn't do a lot of canning, but some. She liked to baked or was always busy cleaning when she wasn't playing the organ or piano. Anyway, I'm not into beets either, and only canned them as my hubby wanted some, and I have another two smalls bags waiting to be canned as well. I figure the least I can do is can him some damn beets. LOLOLOL! Surprising, it wasn't bad or difficult to do. Once I'd cooked them for awhile, I blanched them in cold water to cool 'em down and then slid my thumbs around them to remove the peel and root. Simple enough. Not too messy and an easy cleanup, providing the red color didn't splatter onto my clothes or whatever as they'd stain. I learned quickly, when rinsing the cooked beets, to keep 'em low and the water pressure down so they didn't splatter here and yon.

Binky
10-08-2012, 11:35 AM
Guess it depends on how your hands are kept busy. :cool:


I suppose. But when thinking about it, I would venture a guess that the hands of a serial killer are busy and keeping him happy as well. So it all depends on what makes ya happy. LOLOLOLOL! I prefer canning.

Binky
10-08-2012, 11:40 AM
We were just talking this evening about pressure cookers and how our moms and grandmothers used them everyday. It seems like my grandmother never left the kitchen .... I don't remember her being anywhere but in the kitchen or church.

My mom had one of those as well. I hated using it. When I bought my canning supplies, I opted out on getting a pressure cooker and decided on a very huge canning pot with a jar rack inside instead. I like the idea of it not blowing up in my face as opposed to taking the chance a pressure cooker could. Nope, never liked 'em. Never will. What worked for some, could be looked at as a health hazzard by others. I'm one of the others. :laugh:

glockmail
10-08-2012, 12:01 PM
My grandmother canned but Mom didn't; she bought cans of food. :laugh:

Back BK (before kids) and I had a huge garden with 40 tomatoes plants we canned, stored and froze all our own vegetables to make it through the winter. When we moved WK (with kids) I sold all the old Ball jars at garage sales. I still have the canner though, and plan to take up the hobby again if I can ever get my garden here growing to the point where we have more than we can eat during the growing months.

Binky
10-08-2012, 05:40 PM
My grandmother canned but Mom didn't; she bought cans of food. :laugh:

Back BK (before kids) and I had a huge garden with 40 tomatoes plants we canned, stored and froze all our own vegetables to make it through the winter. When we moved WK (with kids) I sold all the old Ball jars at garage sales. I still have the canner though, and plan to take up the hobby again if I can ever get my garden here growing to the point where we have more than we can eat during the growing months.

I wish I could grow a garden, but alas, I seem to kill everything as it all dies off. So I get all of our veggies and fruits at our local farmers market. Everything, that is, except the tomatoes. Those come from a friend of ours who works with a guy that has 200-300 tomato plants and which have grown a huge amount of them. They're given to us by the boxfulls. I went thru three big boxes and decided to donate the other three boxes to people around town. So those we get for free for as many as I want. Next spring we'll be heading to another town about an hour from here to check out their farmers market. I'm hooked and we just want to see what we can find that is reasonably priced. There's been several people in our area that also sell their produce or whatever at one of our local businesses. I only stopped once when they were having a bake sale. Didn't bother with the veggies as we'd already had a load bought from the farmers market.

fj1200
10-08-2012, 05:52 PM
^Roasted tomato basil soup, yum.

Kathianne
10-08-2012, 06:23 PM
I suppose. But when thinking about it, I would venture a guess that the hands of a serial killer are busy and keeping him happy as well. So it all depends on what makes ya happy. LOLOLOLOL! I prefer canning.

I'm thinking Dexter...

glockmail
10-08-2012, 06:30 PM
I wish I could grow a garden, but alas, I seem to kill everything as it all dies off. So I get all of our veggies and fruits at our local farmers market. Everything, that is, except the tomatoes. Those come from a friend of ours who works with a guy that has 200-300 tomato plants and which have grown a huge amount of them. They're given to us by the boxfulls. I went thru three big boxes and decided to donate the other three boxes to people around town. So those we get for free for as many as I want. Next spring we'll be heading to another town about an hour from here to check out their farmers market. I'm hooked and we just want to see what we can find that is reasonably priced. There's been several people in our area that also sell their produce or whatever at one of our local businesses. I only stopped once when they were having a bake sale. Didn't bother with the veggies as we'd already had a load bought from the farmers market.
I grew up gardening in the northeast under my grandfather's direction. I could grow anything there. Here is a lot tougher, in spite of the longer growing period. It gets too hot in the summer and the soil is a lot different, too much clay content.

logroller
10-08-2012, 07:24 PM
My grandmother canned but Mom didn't; she bought cans of food. :laugh:

Back BK (before kids) and I had a huge garden with 40 tomatoes plants we canned, stored and froze all our own vegetables to make it through the winter. When we moved WK (with kids) I sold all the old Ball jars at garage sales. I still have the canner though, and plan to take up the hobby again if I can ever get my garden here growing to the point where we have more than we can eat during the growing months.


I grew up gardening in the northeast under my grandfather's direction. I could grow anything there. Here is a lot tougher, in spite of the longer growing period. It gets too hot in the summer and the soil is a lot different, too much clay content.
Even before your second post I was thinking of what I'm about to say-- now is the time to start your garden. I too have heavy, alkaline soil. Adding organics now is the key to a healthy garden. It takes time for soil to become rich. In fact, top soil is replenished naturally at one inch per century. When you find your garden performing poorly, it will require intervention. If I'm not mistaken, you're in California. California has a Mediterranean climate, hot dry summers/ wet winters. In those areas where there is natural deposition of organics, alluvial fans and such, this is done naturally during storms. In those areas where we find suburban developments, this is not occurring. Therefor, to correct this it becomes necessary to amend the soil. Soils are alive though, and just like you wouldn't eat a huge meal before exercising, neither should you feed your soil right as you plant it out. By adding compost now, mixing it in and allowing it to 'rest' over winter, your plants will thrive come next season. It does this by feeding the microbes which break down otherwise unusable elements and minerals; and likewise gives the good microbes a head start over whatever detrimental bacteria invariably make their way into your garden. Happy planting.

glockmail
10-08-2012, 09:41 PM
Even before your second post I was thinking of what I'm about to say-- now is the time to start your garden. I too have heavy, alkaline soil. Adding organics now is the key to a healthy garden. It takes time for soil to become rich. In fact, top soil is replenished naturally at one inch per century. When you find your garden performing poorly, it will require intervention. If I'm not mistaken, you're in California. California has a Mediterranean climate, hot dry summers/ wet winters. In those areas where there is natural deposition of organics, alluvial fans and such, this is done naturally during storms. In those areas where we find suburban developments, this is not occurring. Therefor, to correct this it becomes necessary to amend the soil. Soils are alive though, and just like you wouldn't eat a huge meal before exercising, neither should you feed your soil right as you plant it out. By adding compost now, mixing it in and allowing it to 'rest' over winter, your plants will thrive come next season. It does this by feeding the microbes which break down otherwise unusable elements and minerals; and likewise gives the good microbes a head start over whatever detrimental bacteria invariably make their way into your garden. Happy planting.I'm in the Piedmont region, NC. It's all "residual" soils here, weathered in place from the bedrock. It tends to be about 40% clay mixed with fine silts. This area has historically been difficult to farm due to the easily erodible soils, and any topsoil was lost centuries ago. Every county in the region has a "Muddy Creek" in it, and the Yadkin River is a dull reddish brown. I am in a newer suburban development on 1/3 acre but the rear of my property wasn't touched with grading, so its better than most of my yard.

I hear you with the organic material. My grandfather was a master that way. He had a "honey dipper" to empty the septic tank in the fall, hauled leaves from miles away and had a 55 gallon drum with a cover but no bottom for food waste that would dissolve a pine log in a week. We hauled cow manure, horse manure, and one time (only one time) chicken manure.

My problem up until now was time. And I don't have room to keep an old pick-up truck or even a crap trailer, so everything I bring in is hauled in the back of my SUV.

I've been gardening in the same 10' x 20' spot now for 15 years back there. I've roto-tilled it double depth every year. Every fall I dump all my leaves in it and invite my neighbors to do the same. I toss in lime, 10-10-10, milorganite and grass clippings as well. I add compost, but my little plastic bin has not been very successful. My huge three-compartment compost bin made out of RR ties in NY was magic; all sorts of stuff would just disappear into it. Along with garden and kitchen waste I composted lobster and clam shells, bark, and one time the stuffing from a huge down couch. Fireflies used to nest in it, and during the winter it used to glow green with their effervescence (no kidding). I recently started using Bokashi yeast to compost kitchen waste in 5 gallon pails and I'm hoping to get a decent strain of it going in the compost bin.

I do use round-up and weed-b-gone on the lawn but sparingly, and a pre-emergent for crabgrass in the early spring and I hope that hasn't been my problem. I only add clippings to the garden sparingly during the summer (to keep weeds down) and during the fall leaf season.

Over the years I also have been reducing down the size of my lawn from the outside-in, turning that area first into a pine straw mulch bed, and finally expanded the garden into the area with 2' square areas about 8' on center. In those I spade the soil, make borders with firewood logs, then add in 1/2 cubic foot bags of "garden soil" from Lowes mixed with composted manure. That has worked out well with squash and cucumbers. This year we got a bumper crop of eggplant.

Two years ago I added drip irrigation to the system and that has helped me a lot.

This spring we did something different in the main garden that was successful. I had some "volunteer" tomatoes show up, an my wife convinced me to replanted them, hoping we didn't get a weird hybrid. Instead we got disease-resistant tennis ball sized fruits, and we kept some seeds for an heirloom variety.

Next month I'm sitting my friends dog, Sir Vincent Poopsalot. During that time I'll have access to his late 40's Chevrolet flat bed truck, and I plan on hauling a load of leaf mulch from the City yard and adding that to my garden as well. I know some folks that keep horses and I might get a load from them as well.

Kathianne
10-08-2012, 10:04 PM
Illinois is prime farming, DuPage Country especially back in the day (around 1890 and before). When I had 3/4 of acre, my garden was wonderful! Tomatoes, peppers, pumpkin, zucchini, corn, beans, etc. I weeded sporadically, but didn't seem much of an issue. While I used commercial fertilizers, we also composted, both yard and home. Coffee ground were good, and thanks to me, plentiful. Indeed, when we realized what the coffee grounds seemed to bring, we got them from family, neighbors and friends too. Threw them in with compost pile.

I miss having a garden.

glockmail
10-09-2012, 02:24 PM
Didn't know you were that old, Kate. That puts you around 132. :coffee:

Kathianne
10-09-2012, 04:58 PM
Didn't know you were that old, Kate. That puts you around 132. :coffee:

LOL! I was referring to the county, before suburbia explosion, (Yep, this town is mostly old). Which brings to mind some history. Amazingly The Great Chicago Fire comes into play:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheaton,_Illinois


Wheaton is a community located in DuPage County, Illinois (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DuPage_County,_Illinois), approximately 25 miles (40 km) west of Chicago (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago) and Lake Michigan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Michigan). Wheaton is the county seat (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/County_seat) of DuPage County. As of the 2010 census (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_United_States_Census), the city had a total population of 52,894.[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheaton,_Illinois#cite_note-aff2000-1) In 2010 it was listed by Money Magazine as one of the 25 highest earning towns in the United States.[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheaton,_Illinois#cite_note-2) The town is regularly noted for its outstanding school system, New England style community, and more recently as a financial center for investment management companies.


http://i48.tinypic.com/20ic5ck.png

Founding The city dates its founding to the period between 1831 and 1837, following the Indian Removal Act (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Removal_Act), when Erastus Gary laid claim to 790 acres (3.2 km2) of land near present-day Warrenville (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warrenville,_Illinois).[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheaton,_Illinois#cite_note-eoc-3)[5] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheaton,_Illinois#cite_note-tower-4) The Wheaton brothers arrived from Connecticut, and in 1837 Warren Wheaton laid claim to 640 acres (2.6 km2) of land in the center of town. Jesse Wheaton later made claim to 300 acres (1.2 km2) of land just west of Warren's.[5] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheaton,_Illinois#cite_note-tower-4)[6] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheaton,_Illinois#cite_note-cityhist-5) It was not long before other settlers from New England joined them in the community. In 1848, they gave the Galena and Chicago Union Railroad (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galena_and_Chicago_Union_Railroad) three miles (5 km) of right-of-way (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right-of-way_%28transportation%29), upon which railroad officials named the depot Wheaton.[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheaton,_Illinois#cite_note-eoc-3)[6] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheaton,_Illinois#cite_note-cityhist-5) In 1850, ten blocks of land were platted (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plat) and anyone who was willing to build immediately was granted free land. In 1853, the lots were surveyed and a formal plat for the city was filed with the county. The city was then incorporated in 1859 with Warren serving as its first President.[6] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheaton,_Illinois#cite_note-cityhist-5) The city was re-incorporated on March 1, 1890, when the first mayor of the city was selected, Judge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judge) Elbert Gary (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elbert_Henry_Gary), son of Erastus Gary and founder of Gary, Indiana (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary,_Indiana).


Establishment as county seat
http://i46.tinypic.com/qo6sma.png


In 1857, the Illinois state legislature (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illinois_General_Assembly) authorized an election to be held to decide the question of whether the DuPage county seat should remain in Naperville (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naperville,_Illinois) or be moved to the more centrally located Wheaton, which was on the Galena and Chicago Union Railroad (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galena_and_Chicago_Union_Railroad). Naperville won the election by a vote of 1,542 to 762. Hostility between the two towns continued for the next decade and another election was held in 1867, that Wheaton narrowly won by a vote of 1,686 to 1,635. At a cost of $20,000, the City of Wheaton quickly built a courthouse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Courthouse) to house a courtroom (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Courtroom), county offices and a county jail (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/County_jail). The building was dedicated on July 4, 1868.[7]

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheaton,_Illinois#cite_note-6)

However, animosity between the two towns continued, and in 1868, as records were moved from the old Naperville courthouse to the new one in Wheaton, Naperville refused to turn over remaining county records, prompting a band of Civil War (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Civil_War) veterans (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veteran) from Wheaton to conduct what came to be known as the Midnight Raid on the Naperville courthouse. As Wheatonites fled back on Wheaton-Naperville Road, Napervillians were able to secure some last remaining records, which were taken to the Cook County (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cook_County,_Illinois) Recorder in Chicago (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago) for safekeeping. During this time, Naperville was mounting a lawsuit against Wheaton accusing election judges of leaving their posts during the vote. As the courts deliberated the fate of the county seat, the records were destroyed in the Great Chicago Fire (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Chicago_Fire) of 1871. Shortly thereafter, Wheaton was officially proclaimed the county seat.[8]

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheaton,_Illinois#cite_note-7)

As demand for space increased, the courthouse was rebuilt in 1887 at a cost of $69,390, modeled after the courthouse in Aledo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aledo,_Illinois). This structure was used for the next 94 years until the county's rapid growth prompted the building of a brand new complex.[9] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheaton,_Illinois#cite_note-8) The old courthouse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DuPage_County_Courthouse) is listed on the National Register of Historic Places (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Register_of_Historic_Places), and was formerly used by National–Louis University (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National%E2%80%93Louis_University) until National–Louis moved to Lisle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisle,_Illinois) in 2004. It is currently being developed into luxury condominiums (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Condominium).


On November 2, 1990, the courthouse moved to a building about two miles (3 km) west in a new 57-acre (230,000 m2) complex at the corner of County Farm Road and Manchester Road. It was built at a cost of $52,500,000 and includes a 300,000-square-foot (30,000 m2) judicial building. In 1992, the county sued the architect (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Architect) and contractor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_contractor) for $4 million after several employees became ill from the ventilation system.[10] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheaton,_Illinois#cite_note-9) In the end, however, the county received only $120,000 for minor repairs and the jury sided with the defendants, finding that the alleged problems were caused, primarily, by the county's negligent operation and maintenance of the ventilation system.

Binky
10-10-2012, 10:53 PM
^Roasted tomato basil soup, yum.


well, I have a load of my tomato mix just waitin' to be used in something. Yummmm.

Binky
10-10-2012, 10:55 PM
I'm thinking Dexter...

:laugh:
:laugh::laugh: I love that show. Terrific. I'd say his hands are happiest when he's slaying someone. :laugh:

Kathianne
10-10-2012, 11:26 PM
:(

No one hearts my history lesson. I'm shocked. Did I mention the Chicago Fire, not soccer, but heat?

fj1200
10-11-2012, 09:41 AM
well, I have a load of my tomato mix just waitin' to be used in something. Yummmm.

It is good and I don't like raw tomatoes at all. I was going to link to the recipe but I can't find it. I thought it was an Alton Brown recipe but... Here it is, Tyler Florence on the Food Channel.




2 1/2 pounds fresh tomatoes (mix of fresh heirlooms, cherry, vine and plum tomatoes (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/plum-tomato/index.html))
6 cloves garlic (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/garlic/index.html), peeled
2 small yellow onions, sliced
Vine cherry tomatoes for garnish, optional
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/olive-oil/index.html)
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 quart chicken stock
2 bay leaves
4 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup chopped fresh basil leaves, optional
3/4 cup heavy cream, optional

DirectionsPreheat oven to 450 degrees F.
Wash, core and cut the tomatoes into halves. Spread the tomatoes, garlic cloves (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/garlic/index.html) and onions onto a baking tray. If using vine cherry tomatoes (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/tomato/index.html) for garnish, add them as well, leaving them whole and on the vine. Drizzle with 1/2 cup of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast for 20 to 30 minutes, or until caramelized.
Remove roasted tomatoes, garlic and onion from the oven and transfer to a large stock pot (set aside the roasted vine tomatoes for later). Add 3/4 of the chicken stock, bay leaves, and butter. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes or until liquid has reduced by a third.

Wash and dry basil leaves, if using, and add to the pot. Use an immersion blender (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/immersion-blender/index.html) to puree the soup until smooth. Return soup to low heat, add cream and adjust consistency with remaining chicken stock (http://www.foodterms.com/encyclopedia/stock/index.html), if necessary. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Garnish in bowl with 3 or 4 roasted vine cherry tomatoes and a splash of heavy cream.
http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/cda/recipe_print/0,1946,FOOD_9936_35368_RECIPE-PRINT-FULL-PAGE-FORMATTER,00.html

Binky
10-12-2012, 11:20 AM
Yesterday, I made four guarts of apple pie filling with raisins, walnuts, cranberries and dates added in. It tastes great. Now I'm going to make some great smelling homemade bread. About four loaves. Haven't made it in years and am sooooo tired of that frozen stuff or buying it from the bakery. I want to make my own. So todays the day.

Binky
10-12-2012, 12:50 PM
Well, I've just finished making a huge batch of bread dough which is rising now and for the next couple of hours. Then I'll have to knead it again and put it into loaf pans where it'll spend time rising again before I get to pop it into the oven. Man, I can't wait for that scent to begin floating around the house. Wonderful. I enjoyed making it so much I think I'll whip up another big batch within the next few days. Yummy.