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Robert A Whit
04-04-2013, 06:58 PM
<!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:DoNotOptimizeForBrowser/> </w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--> I find this most interesting

http://pure-gas.org/about

Aren't certain brands ethanol-free?
No. All gasoline brands have both pure and ethanol-containing gasoline under the same brand names. For example, Shell V-Power ranges from 91 to 93 octane both with and without added ethanol. It just varies from station to station, and it's up to the station owner whether or not to sell pure gas. In fact, in Madison, Wisconsin there is a Shell station that sells V-Power with ethanol, but added a single pump, at a higher price, dispensing pure 91-octane gas. (It happens to be the pump that I always use, so I figure they understood I wanted pure gas in that one.)
How do I know if a particular gas and grade is ethanol-free?
In most states, stations are required to label the pumps if they contain ethanol over a certain percentage, which varies by state but is usually 1 percent. A few states have no labeling requirement, and you just have to ask someone at the station that knows what goes in the tanks. State-by-state labeling requirements are listed at fuel-testers.com (http://www.fuel-testers.com/state_guide_ethanol_laws.html).
Can I test gas myself to see if it contains ethanol?
Yes, and it's quite easy to do. Inexpensive fuel-testing kits are widely available, or you can just do it yourself: (1) pour a small amount of water into a narrow jar (an olive jar works great) and mark the water level with a Sharpie; (2) add the fuel to around a 10:1 fuel:water ratio; (3) shake well, let settle for a few minutes; (4) see if the water level has risen above the mark. If it has risen, it has combined with ethanol from the fuel.
But isn't pure gas more expensive?
It can be, often due to federal and state tax incentives. We buy it because we want to fuel our vehicles with it. If you want to save money on gas, this site is of no use to you - it will NOT have gasoline prices on it. They vary from day to day and this site isn't about saving money. It's about finding pure gasoline for your machine.
Why does pure gas give me better mileage?
Pure gas gives better mileage than E10, and much better than E85, simply because gasoline has higher free energy than ethanol. The free energy of gasoline is 34.2 MJ per liter. The free energy of ethanol is 24 MJ per liter. That means E10 (10% ethanol) has a free energy of 33.2 MJ per liter, and E85 (85% ethanol) has a free energy of 25.6 MJ per liter. As a result, your mileage is reduced by 3% with E10 over pure gas, and 25% with E85 over pure gas, all else being equal. Mileage can be reduced even more if your engine doesn't run as well on E10, which is often the case.
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logroller
04-04-2013, 11:06 PM
<!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:DoNotOptimizeForBrowser/> </w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--> I find this most interesting

http://pure-gas.org/about

Aren't certain brands ethanol-free?
No. All gasoline brands have both pure and ethanol-containing gasoline under the same brand names. For example, Shell V-Power ranges from 91 to 93 octane both with and without added ethanol. It just varies from station to station, and it's up to the station owner whether or not to sell pure gas. In fact, in Madison, Wisconsin there is a Shell station that sells V-Power with ethanol, but added a single pump, at a higher price, dispensing pure 91-octane gas. (It happens to be the pump that I always use, so I figure they understood I wanted pure gas in that one.)
How do I know if a particular gas and grade is ethanol-free?
In most states, stations are required to label the pumps if they contain ethanol over a certain percentage, which varies by state but is usually 1 percent. A few states have no labeling requirement, and you just have to ask someone at the station that knows what goes in the tanks. State-by-state labeling requirements are listed at fuel-testers.com (http://www.fuel-testers.com/state_guide_ethanol_laws.html).
Can I test gas myself to see if it contains ethanol?
Yes, and it's quite easy to do. Inexpensive fuel-testing kits are widely available, or you can just do it yourself: (1) pour a small amount of water into a narrow jar (an olive jar works great) and mark the water level with a Sharpie; (2) add the fuel to around a 10:1 fuel:water ratio; (3) shake well, let settle for a few minutes; (4) see if the water level has risen above the mark. If it has risen, it has combined with ethanol from the fuel.
But isn't pure gas more expensive?
It can be, often due to federal and state tax incentives. We buy it because we want to fuel our vehicles with it. If you want to save money on gas, this site is of no use to you - it will NOT have gasoline prices on it. They vary from day to day and this site isn't about saving money. It's about finding pure gasoline for your machine.
Why does pure gas give me better mileage?
Pure gas gives better mileage than E10, and much better than E85, simply because gasoline has higher free energy than ethanol. The free energy of gasoline is 34.2 MJ per liter. The free energy of ethanol is 24 MJ per liter. That means E10 (10% ethanol) has a free energy of 33.2 MJ per liter, and E85 (85% ethanol) has a free energy of 25.6 MJ per liter. As a result, your mileage is reduced by 3% with E10 over pure gas, and 25% with E85 over pure gas, all else being equal. Mileage can be reduced even more if your engine doesn't run as well on E10, which is often the case.
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I wonder why the cost difference between E10 and E0 wasn't given....but nonetheless, ethanol doesnt lower the gas prices enough to justify the blending mandate...economically speaking.
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=ethanol-fails-lower-gas-prices-study-finds&page=2

Follow the money....the corn lobby likely has a predominant effect on why we blend ethanol into domestic fuels.

Robert A Whit
04-05-2013, 02:06 PM
http://www.debatepolicy.com/images/debate_policy/misc/quote_icon.png Originally Posted by Robert A Whit http://www.debatepolicy.com/images/debate_policy/buttons/viewpost-right.png (http://www.debatepolicy.com/showthread.php?p=629081#post629081)
I find this most interesting

http://pure-gas.org/about

Aren't certain brands ethanol-free?
No. All gasoline brands have both pure and ethanol-containing gasoline under the same brand names. For example, Shell V-Power ranges from 91 to 93 octane both with and without added ethanol. It just varies from station to station, and it's up to the station owner whether or not to sell pure gas. In fact, in Madison, Wisconsin there is a Shell station that sells V-Power with ethanol, but added a single pump, at a higher price, dispensing pure 91-octane gas. (It happens to be the pump that I always use, so I figure they understood I wanted pure gas in that one.)
How do I know if a particular gas and grade is ethanol-free?
In most states, stations are required to label the pumps if they contain ethanol over a certain percentage, which varies by state but is usually 1 percent. A few states have no labeling requirement, and you just have to ask someone at the station that knows what goes in the tanks. State-by-state labeling requirements are listed at fuel-testers.com (http://www.fuel-testers.com/state_guide_ethanol_laws.html).
Can I test gas myself to see if it contains ethanol?
Yes, and it's quite easy to do. Inexpensive fuel-testing kits are widely available, or you can just do it yourself: (1) pour a small amount of water into a narrow jar (an olive jar works great) and mark the water level with a Sharpie; (2) add the fuel to around a 10:1 fuel:water ratio; (3) shake well, let settle for a few minutes; (4) see if the water level has risen above the mark. If it has risen, it has combined with ethanol from the fuel.
But isn't pure gas more expensive?
It can be, often due to federal and state tax incentives. We buy it because we want to fuel our vehicles with it. If you want to save money on gas, this site is of no use to you - it will NOT have gasoline prices on it. They vary from day to day and this site isn't about saving money. It's about finding pure gasoline for your machine.
Why does pure gas give me better mileage?
Pure gas gives better mileage than E10, and much better than E85, simply because gasoline has higher free energy than ethanol. The free energy of gasoline is 34.2 MJ per liter. The free energy of ethanol is 24 MJ per liter. That means E10 (10% ethanol) has a free energy of 33.2 MJ per liter, and E85 (85% ethanol) has a free energy of 25.6 MJ per liter. As a result, your mileage is reduced by 3% with E10 over pure gas, and 25% with E85 over pure gas, all else being equal. Mileage can be reduced even more if your engine doesn't run as well on E10, which is often the case.


I wonder why the cost difference between E10 and E0 wasn't given....but nonetheless, ethanol doesnt lower the gas prices enough to justify the blending mandate...economically speaking.
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=ethanol-fails-lower-gas-prices-study-finds&page=2

Follow the money....the corn lobby likely has a predominant effect on why we blend ethanol into domestic fuels.

I took a 5,000 mile driving trip in the USA and noticed the superior gasoline mileage I got in Wyoming. It was amazing the increase. I agree, follow the money.

tailfins
04-05-2013, 02:23 PM
I took a 5,000 mile driving trip in the USA and noticed the superior gasoline mileage I got in Wyoming. It was amazing the increase. I agree, follow the money.

At the other extreme, that map link you posted showed NO ethanol-free stations in MA, RI, CT.