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View Full Version : Coffin remains tell life story of ancient sun-worshiping priestess



WiccanLiberal
05-26-2015, 08:19 PM
Once upon a time in the Bronze Age, a girl was born to a family of sun worshipers living in the Black Forest of what is today Germany. When she was young she became a priestess in the local sun cult, and soon attracted the eye of a tribal chief who lived far to the north. The girl’s family married her off, and she went to live with the chief in what is now Denmark. She often traveled back and forth between Denmark and her ancestral home and eventually gave birth to a child while she was away. Sometime before her 18th birthday, she and the child died. They were buried together in an oak coffin, the young woman wearing a bronze belt buckle in the shape of the sun.
How do we know? A new study of the 3400-year-old girl’s chemical isotopes, along with more conventional archaeological evidence, tells us so. At least, these are the conclusions of scientists who recently analyzed the teeth, fingernails, hair, and clothes of the Egtved Girl, so named for the Danish village where archaeologists first discovered her in 1921.
http://news.sciencemag.org/archaeology/2015/05/coffin-remains-tell-life-story-ancient-sun-worshiping-priestess?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=facebook


Fascinating article about how science can uncover details about how our ancestors lived.

Balu
05-29-2015, 10:24 AM
Once upon a time in the Bronze Age, a girl was born to a family of sun worshipers living in the Black Forest of what is today Germany. When she was young she became a priestess in the local sun cult, and soon attracted the eye of a tribal chief who lived far to the north. The girl’s family married her off, and she went to live with the chief in what is now Denmark. She often traveled back and forth between Denmark and her ancestral home and eventually gave birth to a child while she was away. Sometime before her 18th birthday, she and the child died. They were buried together in an oak coffin, the young woman wearing a bronze belt buckle in the shape of the sun.
How do we know? A new study of the 3400-year-old girl’s chemical isotopes, along with more conventional archaeological evidence, tells us so. At least, these are the conclusions of scientists who recently analyzed the teeth, fingernails, hair, and clothes of the Egtved Girl, so named for the Danish village where archaeologists first discovered her in 1921.
http://news.sciencemag.org/archaeology/2015/05/coffin-remains-tell-life-story-ancient-sun-worshiping-priestess?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=facebook


Fascinating article about how science can uncover details about how our ancestors lived.
Can anybody explain how it could happen, or I misunderstood smth.? http://www.kolobok.us/smiles/standart/dntknw.gif