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NightTrain
06-11-2015, 11:26 AM
Went down on a work trip last week to Seward, Soldotna & Kenai (pronounced Keen-Eye) and took a few pics.


Sucks that this one wasn't in focus (hard to get good shots at 70 MPH), but it's a good size Mama Griz with two cubs right beside the highway.

http://www.debatepolicy.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=7300&stc=1

NightTrain
06-11-2015, 11:28 AM
About 40 miles out of Soldotna :

http://www.debatepolicy.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=7301&stc=1

NightTrain
06-11-2015, 11:29 AM
http://www.debatepolicy.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=7302&stc=1

NightTrain
06-11-2015, 11:30 AM
http://www.debatepolicy.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=7303&stc=1

NightTrain
06-11-2015, 11:33 AM
Kenai Lake... the headwaters to the Kenai River.

This body of water is a very unique color of blue/grey, but it doesn't show in this pic because it was such a gloomy day.

http://www.debatepolicy.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=7304&stc=1

jimnyc
06-11-2015, 11:33 AM
Nice! Why didn't you just stop and walk over and get a few pics of the Mama for us? :slap:

NightTrain
06-11-2015, 11:38 AM
Cooper Landing... this is a tiny little town that you NEVER speed though, even though the speed limit is 35 MPH. It's about halfway from Kenai to Anchorage.

That's because a State Trooper lives here and he has nothing better to do than nail speeders. I've talked to the nice policeman a few times before it sunk in that speeding on that stretch was a Bad Idea.

http://www.debatepolicy.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=7305&stc=1

NightTrain
06-11-2015, 11:46 AM
About 50 miles South of Anchorage, near Girdwood.

The pass you see back there is the place where a reckless helicopter pilot almost killed us a few years ago by deliberately flying into the fog and creeping along ridges with a visibility of about 20 feet as we were trying to get over the pass to Whittier. I refused to climb in the chopper with him after that - it was stupid and reckless.

He hasn't killed himself yet, but it won't be long if he keeps doing that crap. We stopped using him completely after I watched him almost crush one of my co-workers with an 18' satellite dish he was slinging to us on an island out in Prince William Sound last year.

http://www.debatepolicy.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=7306&stc=1

NightTrain
06-11-2015, 11:55 AM
Turnagain Arm, about 30 miles South of Anchorage.

It was named by William Bligh, of HMS Bounty fame, while serving under Captain Cook.


Bligh served as Cook's Sailing Master on his 3rd and final voyage, the aim of which was discovery of the Northwest Passage.

Upon reaching the head of Cook Inlet, Bligh was of the opinion that both Knik Arm and Turnagain Arm were the mouths of rivers and not the opening to the Northwest Passage. Under Cook's orders Bligh organized a party to travel up Knik Arm, which quickly returned to report Knik Arm indeed led only to a river.


Afterwards a second party was dispatched up Turnagain Arm and it too returned to report only a river lay ahead. As a result of this frustration the second body of water was given the disingenuous name "Turn Again". Early maps label Turnagain Arm as the "Turnagain River".

http://www.debatepolicy.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=7307&stc=1

NightTrain
06-11-2015, 12:02 PM
Nice! Why didn't you just stop and walk over and get a few pics of the Mama for us? :slap:

Nyet!

I have a real healthy respect for bruin, especially Mamas. I've seen tourists stop and take pictures of such scenes, and they don't realize how incredibly fast Mama can cover that distance if she chooses to.

Abbey
06-11-2015, 12:55 PM
Nice! Why didn't you just stop and walk over and get a few pics of the Mama for us? :slap:

Lol, I understand they really appreciate it when you cuddle their cubs.

Bilgerat
06-11-2015, 01:14 PM
Great Pictures !:clap:

LongTermGuy
06-11-2015, 08:08 PM
:clap::clap::clap:

jimnyc
06-11-2015, 08:41 PM
Nyet!

I have a real healthy respect for bruin, especially Mamas. I've seen tourists stop and take pictures of such scenes, and they don't realize how incredibly fast Mama can cover that distance if she chooses to.

Yeah, I wouldn't do so but from about 75-100 yards at minimum. And even then, I've seen videos of how fast bears can run!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mlvvR3XKUxI

Jeff
06-11-2015, 10:36 PM
NY you make me jealous ever time you post pictures, I wish I was 20 years younger and I would be living up there,it is absolutely beautiful up there.

I had a friend Jim probably remembers him, Tommy Mattie, he was a doper back in the day and he took his Gf and moved up there, I always thought he just moved to get away from the law, heck he probably got his life together and is living in one of the most beautiful places I have ever seen.

My cousin traveled to Alaska for like a year after his Mom dies and he got out of the navy, every picture he showed me looks like yours, they look like a post card, when he had showed them to me I thought he must of gotten all the pictures at a tourist area or something, after all nowhere is that nice. Heck he camped for most of the year and traveled, he worked odd jobs, man I wish I would of went with him. He told me a story about being chased by a young bear, he said he ran down hill because they don't do well running down hill, I thought he was full of it, but he had a picture of a bear running down the hill.

OO yea and even though you make me jealous thank you for posting, they are beautiful

fj1200
06-12-2015, 09:37 AM
Went down on a work trip last week to Seward, Soldotna & Kenai (pronounced Keen-Eye) and took a few pics.

How do I make sure that the bear doesn't eat me when I'm up there in four years and possibly camping?

Jeff
06-12-2015, 09:43 AM
How do I make sure that the bear doesn't eat me when I'm up there in four years and possibly camping?

Hand feed him Fj, take plenty of raw meat with you and when a bear comes into camp take a nice lean raw steak and hand feed him, he will love you forever. :laugh:

NightTrain
06-12-2015, 01:40 PM
How do I make sure that the bear doesn't eat me when I'm up there in four years and possibly camping?

Don't camp next to a river - salmon are every bear's #1 priority during the summer and they roam the banks as they fish 24/7 from late May to early September.

Don't have any sort of food that's not sealed up and stored inside a cooler - their sense of smell is incredible. This includes snacks you may have in your saddlebags, especially candy bars.

Don't leave used cooking utensils (grill, spatula, tongs, forks, knives, etc) laying around. They have to be cleaned as soon as you're done eating, and damn sure not left out overnight.

While awake, it's a good policy to shout every 10 or 15 minutes or so. If they hear you and know you're there, you won't even see 99.9% of them.

Make sure you have a .44 or even a nice .50 pistol on you at all times and under your pillow while sleeping. A .41 is the bare minimum and a .357 is useless. Almost all of the people that get mauled are unarmed in bear country for some crazy reason. You want fully jacketed ammo for penetration, do not use hollow points or the 'dum dum' rounds.

If there is a bear suddenly facing you and it is trying to decide what you are and if you're a threat, stay calm and don't stare him in the eyes - use your peripheral vision. He will stand on his hind legs to try and see you better, and while this is happening you need to present yourself as non-threatening as possible while he makes his decision about you. Talk softly and calmly and whatever you do, do not try to run. He'll catch you within seconds and all you've done is trigger the Cat vs. Mouse instinct. If you can, look down at the ground and slowly back away while still talking calmly.

If the bear is aggressive, he'll begin 'bluff charging'. That means he's acting like he's charging you and is trying to see if you'll turn tail and run for it. Again, he'll have you in seconds if you do run.. It's impossible to know initially if the charge is the real deal or not, and it is scary as hell - and at this point, he's trying to be scary as hell and they're good at that. Hold your position facing him, but continue to back away slowly. If he continues the charge past 2 leaps toward you, then it's the real deal and you need to be slinging lead at him.

If he initiates a charge, then you've got a couple of seconds to unload your pistol at him. You want to shoot for the front of his chest - do NOT shoot at his head, because his skull is incredibly thick and you won't penetrate it. A head shot will just piss him off and you've wasted a precious round. Aim for the chest and knock out those front legs, along with the vital organs. A bear without the use of his front legs won't be able to continue the attack and is immobile.

Once the bear has adrenaline flowing, they can continue to operate for an amazingly long time without the heart & lungs. There's been cases of bears being shot to swiss cheese in the vital organs and still continuing the attack - it's imperative that you take out those front shoulders.

Keep in mind that almost every bear confrontation resolves peacefully, with no injury to either party (with the exception to your Fruit-of-the-Looms) and it just needs to be handled correctly. If there are cubs in the equation, the odds of violent combat are increased significantly, and it all depends on how Mama perceives the threat you pose to her cubs.

A dog is the best bear deterrence you can have, but you won't have that option on your bike unless you get a sidecar. However, there are many stories regarding stupid dogs that go out from camp, find and antagonize a bear who was minding his own business, and then leading a very pissed off bear back into camp. In this case, I would shoot the idiot dog first and then finish the bear.

There are pepper sprays and bear sprays that are widely sold... and maybe they work, maybe they don't. I just don't know. I personally think if a bear decides to charge you, it's not going to matter what kind of spray you have and all you've done is provide seasoning. My money is on a trusty high-caliber handgun.

So, anyway...

1) No food/drippings/utensils in camp that can waft on the breeze to lure them in

2) Make your presence known by shouting every few minutes

3) Don't try to run

4) Keep your pistol loaded (with the proper ammo) and with you at all times

5) Don't set up camp next to a salmon loaded river

6) Always shoot for those front shoulders

NightTrain
06-12-2015, 02:44 PM
He told me a story about being chased by a young bear, he said he ran down hill because they don't do well running down hill, I thought he was full of it, but he had a picture of a bear running down the hill. l

I think your buddy was having a little fun with you, or telling you a tall tale. Bears can run downhill just as well as any animal.

I've heard the downhill theories before, and the proponents to those stories think that because the bear's claws are curved like they are, that makes it 'impossible' for the bear to stop or maneuver very well while running downhill. If a bear needs to make an emergency stop, he'll simply drop on his ass like any animal, shed the excessive speed, then make his turn.

He's still going to easily outrun and outmaneuver a human... we aren't even in the same league by a long shot, physically.

The only advantage a human might have that I can see would be a scenario where the slope is very steep and you stopped your own fast descent by jumping sideways and grabbing a handy tree. But that advantage would only last maybe 2 seconds before the bear got turned around, and then those impressive claws will give him all the traction he needs to close the gap and bring a severe ass-kicking with him.

Climbing a tree would be a good idea if you have time when it's a Griz/Brown, because adults can't climb trees. But black bears have retractable claws like a cat and are superb tree climbers, so in that case you're still in trouble.

fj1200
06-12-2015, 04:15 PM
I think I just boiled it down to this.


Don't camp.

:laugh:

You already told me I couldn't get a gun through Canada so there goes #4 and #6.

darin
06-12-2015, 04:30 PM
that country - holy cow. Reminds me of Central Washington State - but larger. Check out the vid I did driving from WA to Montana -

you'll see what I mean - at least in the first part.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAcAuwmRyJQ

NightTrain
06-12-2015, 05:44 PM
I think I just boiled it down to this.



:laugh:

You already told me I couldn't get a gun through Canada so there goes #4 and #6.


Nah... I don't want to alarm you, man. Just follow the rules there and you'll have no trouble. I just wanted to give you all of the info.

Mail your piece to yourself for General Delivery in Tok, which is only a few miles this side of the border. A quick call to the Post Office should answer any questions you have and you're certainly not the first person who wants their firearm in Alaska without having the Canadians freaking out at the border.

I've camped hundreds of times in bear country with no incidents by just using the rules above.

darin
06-12-2015, 09:35 PM
I've read a bit about driving through Canada with a firearm and it's not completely stupid - a couple forms and lock boxes and you'd be set.

NightTrain
06-12-2015, 09:39 PM
I've read a bit about driving through Canada with a firearm and it's not completely stupid - a couple forms and lock boxes and you'd be set.

I've been told that's changed in the last few years and they don't allow any handgun across now. Rifles and shotguns are still okay, with a bunch of paperwork and an official seal put on it that had better be intact when you show up at the other side.

It's possible I've been told wrong, though.

NightTrain
06-12-2015, 09:49 PM
Here's what the Canucks say on the official site :


Restricted Firearms : Primarily handguns; however, pepper spray and mace are also included in this category. A restricted firearm may be brought into Canada, but an Authorization to Transport (ATT) permit must be obtained in advance from a Provincial or Territorial Chief Firearms Officer. The ATT will not be issued for hunting or self-protection purposes.

http://canada.usembassy.gov/traveling_to_canada/bringing-weapons-into-canada.html

They'll ask FJ what it's for, and the honest answer is self-protection so that nixes that option. I guess competitive shooting would be acceptable but I think you'd have to have some ready answers and maybe paperwork to prove it. Getting caught in a lie over a handgun at the border would be a really bad deal these days.

Canadians have never liked Americans hauling firearms through their country, but they especially loathe pistols.

Jeff
06-13-2015, 02:28 AM
I think your buddy was having a little fun with you, or telling you a tall tale. Bears can run downhill just as well as any animal.

I've heard the downhill theories before, and the proponents to those stories think that because the bear's claws are curved like they are, that makes it 'impossible' for the bear to stop or maneuver very well while running downhill. If a bear needs to make an emergency stop, he'll simply drop on his ass like any animal, shed the excessive speed, then make his turn.

He's still going to easily outrun and outmaneuver a human... we aren't even in the same league by a long shot, physically.

The only advantage a human might have that I can see would be a scenario where the slope is very steep and you stopped your own fast descent by jumping sideways and grabbing a handy tree. But that advantage would only last maybe 2 seconds before the bear got turned around, and then those impressive claws will give him all the traction he needs to close the gap and bring a severe ass-kicking with him.

Climbing a tree would be a good idea if you have time when it's a Griz/Brown, because adults can't climb trees. But black bears have retractable claws like a cat and are superb tree climbers, so in that case you're still in trouble.

NT I look at bears the same as I do snakes, I am not taking any chances, I carry a big gun and the heck with running up or Down ( dang liar :laugh: ) hill or climbing a tree, I am shooting. Seriously bears and wild hogs worry me, not to much else in the wild does like them.

darin
06-13-2015, 08:30 AM
Here's what the Canucks say on the official site :



[/FONT][/COLOR]http://canada.usembassy.gov/traveling_to_canada/bringing-weapons-into-canada.html

They'll ask FJ what it's for, and the honest answer is self-protection so that nixes that option. I guess competitive shooting would be acceptable but I think you'd have to have some ready answers and maybe paperwork to prove it. Getting caught in a lie over a handgun at the border would be a really bad deal these days.

Canadians have never liked Americans hauling firearms through their country, but they especially loathe pistols.

I think the best answer is "I'm travelling through Canada - I have no use for the weapon within your borders." - if you can freight them ahead - as mentioned on that site - probably best except you will be left wanting if you find a Canadian bear on your way to Alaska :)

NightTrain
06-13-2015, 08:30 AM
http://www.debatepolicy.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=7312&stc=1

jimnyc
06-13-2015, 09:47 AM
Don't camp next to a river - salmon are every bear's #1 priority during the summer and they roam the banks as they fish 24/7 from late May to early September.

Don't have any sort of food that's not sealed up and stored inside a cooler - their sense of smell is incredible. This includes snacks you may have in your saddlebags, especially candy bars.

Don't leave used cooking utensils (grill, spatula, tongs, forks, knives, etc) laying around. They have to be cleaned as soon as you're done eating, and damn sure not left out overnight.

While awake, it's a good policy to shout every 10 or 15 minutes or so. If they hear you and know you're there, you won't even see 99.9% of them.

Make sure you have a .44 or even a nice .50 pistol on you at all times and under your pillow while sleeping. A .41 is the bare minimum and a .357 is useless. Almost all of the people that get mauled are unarmed in bear country for some crazy reason. You want fully jacketed ammo for penetration, do not use hollow points or the 'dum dum' rounds.

If there is a bear suddenly facing you and it is trying to decide what you are and if you're a threat, stay calm and don't stare him in the eyes - use your peripheral vision. He will stand on his hind legs to try and see you better, and while this is happening you need to present yourself as non-threatening as possible while he makes his decision about you. Talk softly and calmly and whatever you do, do not try to run. He'll catch you within seconds and all you've done is trigger the Cat vs. Mouse instinct. If you can, look down at the ground and slowly back away while still talking calmly.

If the bear is aggressive, he'll begin 'bluff charging'. That means he's acting like he's charging you and is trying to see if you'll turn tail and run for it. Again, he'll have you in seconds if you do run.. It's impossible to know initially if the charge is the real deal or not, and it is scary as hell - and at this point, he's trying to be scary as hell and they're good at that. Hold your position facing him, but continue to back away slowly. If he continues the charge past 2 leaps toward you, then it's the real deal and you need to be slinging lead at him.

If he initiates a charge, then you've got a couple of seconds to unload your pistol at him. You want to shoot for the front of his chest - do NOT shoot at his head, because his skull is incredibly thick and you won't penetrate it. A head shot will just piss him off and you've wasted a precious round. Aim for the chest and knock out those front legs, along with the vital organs. A bear without the use of his front legs won't be able to continue the attack and is immobile.

Once the bear has adrenaline flowing, they can continue to operate for an amazingly long time without the heart & lungs. There's been cases of bears being shot to swiss cheese in the vital organs and still continuing the attack - it's imperative that you take out those front shoulders.

Keep in mind that almost every bear confrontation resolves peacefully, with no injury to either party (with the exception to your Fruit-of-the-Looms) and it just needs to be handled correctly. If there are cubs in the equation, the odds of violent combat are increased significantly, and it all depends on how Mama perceives the threat you pose to her cubs.

A dog is the best bear deterrence you can have, but you won't have that option on your bike unless you get a sidecar. However, there are many stories regarding stupid dogs that go out from camp, find and antagonize a bear who was minding his own business, and then leading a very pissed off bear back into camp. In this case, I would shoot the idiot dog first and then finish the bear.

There are pepper sprays and bear sprays that are widely sold... and maybe they work, maybe they don't. I just don't know. I personally think if a bear decides to charge you, it's not going to matter what kind of spray you have and all you've done is provide seasoning. My money is on a trusty high-caliber handgun.

So, anyway...

1) No food/drippings/utensils in camp that can waft on the breeze to lure them in

2) Make your presence known by shouting every few minutes

3) Don't try to run

4) Keep your pistol loaded (with the proper ammo) and with you at all times

5) Don't set up camp next to a salmon loaded river

6) Always shoot for those front shoulders

Just read this now. WTF? Sounds like if I come visit I got a 50/50 chance of being eaten by a nice cuddly bear? Them odds aren't in my favor!! I won't have a gun, and I'm dumb enough to think they're friendly little buggers. Can they catch me if on a snow mobile? Is there a lot of spiders in Alaska?

NightTrain
06-13-2015, 10:35 AM
Just read this now. WTF? Sounds like if I come visit I got a 50/50 chance of being eaten by a nice cuddly bear? Them odds aren't in my favor!! I won't have a gun, and I'm dumb enough to think they're friendly little buggers. Can they catch me if on a snow mobile? Is there a lot of spiders in Alaska?

No, you'd be safe. I've only had one incident in 40 years where I was unarmed and a bear was bluff charging me... and that was just a case of a very stupid bear wandering into the yard at the cabin with her cub. She's no longer around.

They're hibernating when you'd be on a snowmachine, but no - they couldn't catch you on a sled.

Yeah, there are spiders, but not as many as down in the lower 48. They like the warmer climates. I wouldn't mind more of them up here, honestly, because they eat a lot of bugs. Any critter that takes out mosquitoes is a good guy in my book!

jimnyc
06-13-2015, 10:49 AM
No, you'd be safe. I've only had one incident in 40 years where I was unarmed and a bear was bluff charging me... and that was just a case of a very stupid bear wandering into the yard at the cabin with her cub. She's no longer around.

They're hibernating when you'd be on a snowmachine, but no - they couldn't catch you on a sled.

Yeah, there are spiders, but not as many as down in the lower 48. They like the warmer climates. I wouldn't mind more of them up here, honestly, because they eat a lot of bugs. Any critter that takes out mosquitoes is a good guy in my book!

Yeah, a brown recluse eats bugs. Ever see what happens to the human skin when necrosis sets in? LOL Yek!

NightTrain
06-13-2015, 11:04 AM
Yeah, a brown recluse eats bugs. Ever see what happens to the human skin when necrosis sets in? LOL Yek!

Those Brown Recluse spiders are no joke.

There are a few of them up here, and there's been a couple of reported bites from those that were widely reported on in the papers here. They don't survive the winter, though, so their presence is short lived. The prevailing theory is that they hitched a ride in someone's personal belongings or on a vehicle shipped from the lower 48.

jimnyc
06-13-2015, 11:16 AM
Those Brown Recluse spiders are no joke.

There are a few of them up here, and there's been a couple of reported bites from those that were widely reported on in the papers here. They don't survive the winter, though, so their presence is short lived. The prevailing theory is that they hitched a ride in someone's personal belongings or on a vehicle shipped from the lower 48.

Same as here, we really don't have any, but every now and again you hear of them hitching rides from the south or mid states. I probably wouldn't be so bad if I didn't already watch some gross and nasty videos about what happens if them little suckers get you. But can't go back in time now!! LOL

Suppose I'm there, and in a shed outside the cabin. I notice a brown recluse (and after crapping my pants) I run out of the shed - only to see a Grizzly between me and the door of the cabin. I have no gun. My first instinct would probably be to climb on top of the shed, because NO WAY I go into a shed with one of them evil killers. But I'm also not fond of a Grizzlies 84 foot claw swiping my head off either. So I think I would be superhuman and jump on top of the shed and taking my chances that someone hears my sissy screams and saves my life in time.

NightTrain
06-13-2015, 11:34 AM
Same as here, we really don't have any, but every now and again you hear of them hitching rides from the south or mid states. I probably wouldn't be so bad if I didn't already watch some gross and nasty videos about what happens if them little suckers get you. But can't go back in time now!! LOL

Suppose I'm there, and in a shed outside the cabin. I notice a brown recluse (and after crapping my pants) I run out of the shed - only to see a Grizzly between me and the door of the cabin. I have no gun. My first instinct would probably be to climb on top of the shed, because NO WAY I go into a shed with one of them evil killers. But I'm also not fond of a Grizzlies 84 foot claw swiping my head off either. So I think I would be superhuman and jump on top of the shed and taking my chances that someone hears my sissy screams and saves my life in time.

lol, I'd take my chances with the spider inside the shed. There's lots of tools in there to smash the offending spider at a safe distance!

Besides, the shed has 8' walls and a 12:12 pitch... so even if you did make it up the wall, the 45 degree angle combined with the slippery metal roof would make it pretty hard to claw your way up to the peak there - not that it's impossible if properly motivated.

fj1200
06-15-2015, 11:21 AM
They'll ask FJ what it's for, and the honest answer is self-protection so that nixes that option.

But I would say self protection... FROM BEARS!!!

darin
06-15-2015, 12:14 PM
...don't forget BigFoots. (http://www.debatepolicy.com/showthread.php?31459-Bigfoot-a-true-personal-story)