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tailfins
08-26-2015, 08:55 AM
I remember reading about the following in a book somewhere. What is more interesting, watching a Western movie or attending a corporate meeting? It's the Western movie, of course. Remember that the Western movie is ONE WAY communication. There's a villain, a fight, a struggle. Now let's consider the typical corporate meeting: It's often dominated by a yes-man environment. You need three Mountain Dews just to stay awake. Yet, it's TWO WAY communication. I'm not speaking EXCLUSIVELY about DP, but include it in this topic. What's the RIGHT amount of conflict?

fj1200
08-26-2015, 09:05 AM
What's the RIGHT amount of conflict?

That depends. Is the organization dysfunctional? Does the conflict lead to resolution or a more focused organization?

revelarts
08-29-2015, 08:31 AM
I remember reading about the following in a book somewhere. What is more interesting, watching a Western movie or attending a corporate meeting? It's the Western movie, of course. Remember that the Western movie is ONE WAY communication. There's a villain, a fight, a struggle. Now let's consider the typical corporate meeting: It's often dominated by a yes-man environment. You need three Mountain Dews just to stay awake. Yet, it's TWO WAY communication. I'm not speaking EXCLUSIVELY about DP, but include it in this topic. What's the RIGHT amount of conflict?

I'm not sure if "the right amount of conflict" and "hero and villain" are the right context for meetings/biz.

that's part of the problem. people come to meetings making issues personal rather than putting problems on the table and letting everyone examine it have input pro and con. and then try to come to the best solution for the joint problems.

if peoples Depts or work are reflexed on poorly, some of course will take it as an "attack" but in better orgs everyone is responsible to help make each dept work.

there are no villains only problems to be solved.
If some block progress they can be helped or gently moved out of the way.
that's as much conflict as needed IMO.

gabosaurus
08-29-2015, 10:48 AM
Why does there need to be conflict? Unless some people go in looking for confrontation.
Business meetings are normally structured to be informational. You shouldn't go in with an axe to grind. That is why you schedule personal meetings.
Tailfins, why do I think you enjoy confrontation?

tailfins
08-31-2015, 07:56 PM
Why does there need to be conflict? Unless some people go in looking for confrontation.
Business meetings are normally structured to be informational. You shouldn't go in with an axe to grind. That is why you schedule personal meetings.
Tailfins, why do I think you enjoy confrontation?

I'm guessing you do to melt away boredom. If you get ten people in a room deciding how to proceed on a project, you'll get ten different ways to proceed. If there isn't some conflict and disagreement it means somebody is being stifled. A vigorous discussion means that ideas are getting well vetted. Those who are stifled become disengaged.