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Tyr-Ziu Saxnot
09-19-2015, 10:00 AM
Great writer, great poet, great columnist /editor -Frank L. Stanton

Frank Lebby Stanton
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Born February 22, 1857
Charleston, South Carolina, USA
Died January 7, 1927 (aged 69)
Atlanta, Georgia
Pen name Frank L. Stanton
Frank Stanton
F. L. Stanton
Occupation Poet, lyricist, columnist
Nationality United States
Ethnicity Caucasian
Literary movement Early Southern Renaissance

Notable works
"Just Awearyin' for You"
"Mighty Like a Rose"
""Morning"
Frank Lebby Stanton (February 22, 1857 – January 7, 1927),[1] frequently credited as Frank L. Stanton, Frank Stanton or F. L. Stanton, was an American lyricist.
He was also the initial columnist for the Atlanta Constitution and became the first poet laureate of the State of Georgia, a post to which he was appointed by Governor Clifford Walker in 1925 and which Stanton held until his death.[2]
Contents
1 Eminence
2 Verse
3 Productivity
4 Legacy
5 Musical settings of his poetry
6 References
7 External links
Eminence[edit]
Stanton was born in Charleston, South Carolina, to Valentine Stanton (a printer, Confederate soldier, and farmer) and his wife Catherine Rebecca Parry Stanton, whose father owned a plantation on Kiaweh Island. From early childhood he was influenced by the hymns of Isaac Watts and Charles Wesley and was reared in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. After starting school in Savannah, Georgia, Frank Lebby Stanton found his education cut off by the American Civil War. At the age of 12 he became apprenticed to a printer, a position which allowed him to enter the newspaper business. In 1887 he met Leone Josey while he was working for the Smithville News; they married and, in 1888, moved to Rome, Georgia, where Frank Lebby Stanton had received an offer from John Temple Graves to serve as night editor for the Rome Tribune. With encouragement from Joel Chandler Harris, Stanton in 1889 switched to the Atlanta Constitution (where for a few months he worked for Henry W. Grady prior to Grady's death), and began to focus more on writing editorials and columns, a newspaper role which he filled from then until Stanton's death in 1927.[3] Stanton's writing became quite popular and assiduously read. His column News from Billville (later Up from Georgia) forms the basis for claims that he was even the prototype for American newspaper columnists.[4] Frank Lebby Stanton died, aged 69, in Atlanta, Georgia. He and Leone Josey Stanton were survived by their children—Marcelle Stanton Megahee and Frank Lebby Stanton Jr.[5]

Stanton circa 1892
Verse[edit]
Frank Lebby Stanton's verse is marked by simplicity and charm as well as sentimentality which was then en vogue. His poems include a number which he wrote in dialect, a challenge for which he had special knack, such as "Mighty Lak a Rose" (which was set to music by Ethelbert Nevin [1862-1901]). The music for "A Plantation Ditty" (first line "De gray owl sing fum de chimbly top") by Stanton was composed by Sidney Homer.[6] Several of Stanton's ballads were set to music by Oley Speaks.[7] Possibly Stanton's most successful hit in popular music was his lyrics for the wildly selling 1901 parlor song "Awearyin' for You" for which Carrie Jacobs-Bond provided the familiar tune.[8] "Linger Not" and "Until God's Day" are two other songs on which Stanton and Jacobs-Bond collaborated.[9]
Productivity[edit]
According to the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC), Stanton's writings include 171 items in 309 publications in 3 languages and 1,483 library holdings" (OCLC WorldCat hits).[10]

Stanton's familiar poem of optimism and encouragement
Collections of his work are listed by Connecticut State Library,[11] Valdosta State University,[12] University of Rochester (Eastman School of Music),[13] and Music Australia.[14]
On many occasions, leading to his selection as poet laureate, Stanton was called on to furnish poetry for occasions of state, one of them being the opening of Atlanta's Cotton States and International Exposition (1895).[15] On 1916 February 23, the day after Stanton's 59th birthday, public schools throughout Georgia held commemorations of his achievements. Walker, in appointing Stanton Georgia's poet laureate, stated that no one had ever previously been appointed poet laureate of any southern state.[16]

Stanton wrote the lyrics of "Just Awearyin' for You" and Carrie Jacobs-Bond the music.[17] In the first edition's frontispiece, credit to Stanton is missing. He was often remiss in protecting his work, and only after publication did Jacobs-Bond become aware of Stanton's authorship of what had been printed as an anonymous poem by a Chicago newspaper.[18] Stanton's name was added to the score, and Jacobs-Bond amicably began paying him a revenue stream which became his most lucrative source of royalties.[19]
Legacy[edit]
Stanton has been frequently compared with Indiana's James Whitcomb Riley or called "the James Whitcomb Riley of the South"; Stanton and Riley were close friends who frequently traded poetic ideas.[20] Although Stanton frequently wrote in the dialect of black southerners and poor whites, he was an opponent of the less-admirable aspects (such as lynching) of the culture in which he lived, and he tended to be compatible in philosophy with the southern progressivism of his employer, the Atlanta Constitution, for which he wrote editorials. These and other characteristics of Stanton are well elaborated in the scholarly essays on him by Francis J. Bosha[21] and Bruce M. Swain.[22]

Multi-voice-ranges 1901 cover of Ethelbert Nevin's tune for "Mighty Lak' a Rose" for which Stanton wrote the lyrics. The dialect title means (approximately) "very much like a rose" and is supposedly sung by a mother to her young son. The first line, by which the opus is occasionally known, is "Sweetest li'l feller" (sweetest little fellow).
Shortly after his death Stanton was commemorated in the naming of the Frank Lebby Stanton Elementary School, which, after the redesignation of a street name for its eponym still unborn at the time of Stanton's death, is at 1625 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in Atlanta.[23]
Five items by Stanton appear in Edmund Clarence Stedman's American Anthology 1787-1900, published in 1900:[24]
"One Country" (Stedman's Item 1286)
"A Plantation Ditty" (Stedman's Item 1287)
"The Graveyard Rabbit" (Stedman's Item 1288)
"The Mocking-Bird" (Stedman's Item 1289)
"A Little Way" (Stedman's Item 1290)
One of Stanton's works most widely quoted during his lifetime was a quatrain titled "This World"; it is enscribed on his tombstone in Atlanta's Westview Cemetery:[25]

This world we're a'livin' in
Is mighty hard to beat.
You get a thorn with every rose.
But ain't the roses sweet?

Musical settings of his poetry[edit]
Stanton collaborated with African American composer Harry Thacker Burleigh in the sheet music for his poem "Jean" (Burleigh composed and harmonized the tune).[26] American composers of art songs such as Ethelbert Nevin and Carrie Jacobs Bond wrote songs to his verses; composer Oley Speaks also set at least four of his poems to music: "The Hills of Dawn", "In Maytime", "Morning",[27] and "When Mabel Sings". Joshua Emdon set his famous "Keep-A' Goin'!"

Tyr-Ziu Saxnot
09-19-2015, 10:15 AM
Great writer, great poet, great columnist /editor -Frank L. Stanton

Frank Lebby Stanton
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Born February 22, 1857
Charleston, South Carolina, USA
Died January 7, 1927 (aged 69)
Atlanta, Georgia
Pen name Frank L. Stanton
Frank Stanton
F. L. Stanton
Occupation Poet, lyricist, columnist
Nationality United States
Ethnicity Caucasian
Literary movement Early Southern Renaissance

Notable works
"Just Awearyin' for You"
"Mighty Like a Rose"
""Morning"
Frank Lebby Stanton (February 22, 1857 – January 7, 1927),[1] frequently credited as Frank L. Stanton, Frank Stanton or F. L. Stanton, was an American lyricist.
He was also the initial columnist for the Atlanta Constitution and became the first poet laureate of the State of Georgia, a post to which he was appointed by Governor Clifford Walker in 1925 and which Stanton held until his death.[2]
Contents
1 Eminence
2 Verse
3 Productivity
4 Legacy
5 Musical settings of his poetry
6 References
7 External links
Eminence[edit]
Stanton was born in Charleston, South Carolina, to Valentine Stanton (a printer, Confederate soldier, and farmer) and his wife Catherine Rebecca Parry Stanton, whose father owned a plantation on Kiaweh Island. From early childhood he was influenced by the hymns of Isaac Watts and Charles Wesley and was reared in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. After starting school in Savannah, Georgia, Frank Lebby Stanton found his education cut off by the American Civil War. At the age of 12 he became apprenticed to a printer, a position which allowed him to enter the newspaper business. In 1887 he met Leone Josey while he was working for the Smithville News; they married and, in 1888, moved to Rome, Georgia, where Frank Lebby Stanton had received an offer from John Temple Graves to serve as night editor for the Rome Tribune. With encouragement from Joel Chandler Harris, Stanton in 1889 switched to the Atlanta Constitution (where for a few months he worked for Henry W. Grady prior to Grady's death), and began to focus more on writing editorials and columns, a newspaper role which he filled from then until Stanton's death in 1927.[3] Stanton's writing became quite popular and assiduously read. His column News from Billville (later Up from Georgia) forms the basis for claims that he was even the prototype for American newspaper columnists.[4] Frank Lebby Stanton died, aged 69, in Atlanta, Georgia. He and Leone Josey Stanton were survived by their children—Marcelle Stanton Megahee and Frank Lebby Stanton Jr.[5]

Stanton circa 1892
Verse[edit]
Frank Lebby Stanton's verse is marked by simplicity and charm as well as sentimentality which was then en vogue. His poems include a number which he wrote in dialect, a challenge for which he had special knack, such as "Mighty Lak a Rose" (which was set to music by Ethelbert Nevin [1862-1901]). The music for "A Plantation Ditty" (first line "De gray owl sing fum de chimbly top") by Stanton was composed by Sidney Homer.[6] Several of Stanton's ballads were set to music by Oley Speaks.[7] Possibly Stanton's most successful hit in popular music was his lyrics for the wildly selling 1901 parlor song "Awearyin' for You" for which Carrie Jacobs-Bond provided the familiar tune.[8] "Linger Not" and "Until God's Day" are two other songs on which Stanton and Jacobs-Bond collaborated.[9]
Productivity[edit]
According to the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC), Stanton's writings include 171 items in 309 publications in 3 languages and 1,483 library holdings" (OCLC WorldCat hits).[10]

Stanton's familiar poem of optimism and encouragement
Collections of his work are listed by Connecticut State Library,[11] Valdosta State University,[12] University of Rochester (Eastman School of Music),[13] and Music Australia.[14]
On many occasions, leading to his selection as poet laureate, Stanton was called on to furnish poetry for occasions of state, one of them being the opening of Atlanta's Cotton States and International Exposition (1895).[15] On 1916 February 23, the day after Stanton's 59th birthday, public schools throughout Georgia held commemorations of his achievements. Walker, in appointing Stanton Georgia's poet laureate, stated that no one had ever previously been appointed poet laureate of any southern state.[16]

Stanton wrote the lyrics of "Just Awearyin' for You" and Carrie Jacobs-Bond the music.[17] In the first edition's frontispiece, credit to Stanton is missing. He was often remiss in protecting his work, and only after publication did Jacobs-Bond become aware of Stanton's authorship of what had been printed as an anonymous poem by a Chicago newspaper.[18] Stanton's name was added to the score, and Jacobs-Bond amicably began paying him a revenue stream which became his most lucrative source of royalties.[19]
Legacy[edit]
Stanton has been frequently compared with Indiana's James Whitcomb Riley or called "the James Whitcomb Riley of the South"; Stanton and Riley were close friends who frequently traded poetic ideas.[20] Although Stanton frequently wrote in the dialect of black southerners and poor whites, he was an opponent of the less-admirable aspects (such as lynching) of the culture in which he lived, and he tended to be compatible in philosophy with the southern progressivism of his employer, the Atlanta Constitution, for which he wrote editorials. These and other characteristics of Stanton are well elaborated in the scholarly essays on him by Francis J. Bosha[21] and Bruce M. Swain.[22]

Multi-voice-ranges 1901 cover of Ethelbert Nevin's tune for "Mighty Lak' a Rose" for which Stanton wrote the lyrics. The dialect title means (approximately) "very much like a rose" and is supposedly sung by a mother to her young son. The first line, by which the opus is occasionally known, is "Sweetest li'l feller" (sweetest little fellow).
Shortly after his death Stanton was commemorated in the naming of the Frank Lebby Stanton Elementary School, which, after the redesignation of a street name for its eponym still unborn at the time of Stanton's death, is at 1625 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in Atlanta.[23]
Five items by Stanton appear in Edmund Clarence Stedman's American Anthology 1787-1900, published in 1900:[24]
"One Country" (Stedman's Item 1286)
"A Plantation Ditty" (Stedman's Item 1287)
"The Graveyard Rabbit" (Stedman's Item 1288)
"The Mocking-Bird" (Stedman's Item 1289)
"A Little Way" (Stedman's Item 1290)
One of Stanton's works most widely quoted during his lifetime was a quatrain titled "This World"; it is enscribed on his tombstone in Atlanta's Westview Cemetery:[25]

This world we're a'livin' in
Is mighty hard to beat.
You get a thorn with every rose.
But ain't the roses sweet?

Musical settings of his poetry[edit]
Stanton collaborated with African American composer Harry Thacker Burleigh in the sheet music for his poem "Jean" (Burleigh composed and harmonized the tune).[26] American composers of art songs such as Ethelbert Nevin and Carrie Jacobs Bond wrote songs to his verses; composer Oley Speaks also set at least four of his poems to music: "The Hills of Dawn", "In Maytime", "Morning",[27] and "When Mabel Sings". Joshua Emdon set his famous "Keep-A' Goin'!"




http://self.gutenberg.org/articles/frank_lebby_stanton


VERSE
Frank Lebby Stanton's verse is marked by simplicity and charm as well as sentimentality which was then en vogue. His poems include a number which he wrote in dialect, a challenge for which he had special knack, such as "Mighty Lak a Rose" (which was set to music by Ethelbert Nevin [1862-1901]). The music for "A Plantation Ditty" (first line "De gray owl sing fum de chimbly top") by Stanton was composed by Sidney Homer.[6] Several of Stanton's ballads were set to music by Oley Speaks.[7] Possibly Stanton's most successful hit in popular music was his lyrics for the wildly selling 1901 parlor song "Just Awearyin' for You" for which Carrie Jacobs-Bond provided the familiar tune.[8] "Linger Not" and "Until God's Day" are two other songs on which Stanton and Jacobs-Bond collaborated.[9]
PRODUCTIVITY
According to the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC), Stanton's writings include 171 items in 309 publications in 3 languages and 1,483 library holdings" (OCLC WorldCat hits).[10] Collections of his work are listed by Connecticut State Library,[11] Valdosta State University,[12] University of Rochester (Eastman School of Music),[13] and Music Australia.[14] On many occasions, leading to his selection as poet laureate, Stanton was called on to furnish poetry for occasions of state, one of them being the opening of Atlanta's Cotton States and International Exposition (1895).[15] On 1916 February 23, the day after Stanton's 59th birthday, public schools throughout Georgia held commemorations of his achievements. Walker, in appointing Stanton Georgia's poet laureate, stated that no one had ever previously been appointed poet laureate of any southern state.[16]

LEGACY
Stanton has been frequently compared with Indiana's James Whitcomb Riley or called "the James Whitcomb Riley of the South"; Stanton and Riley were close friends who frequently traded poetic ideas.[20] Although Stanton frequently wrote in the dialect of black southerners and poor whites, he was an opponent of the less-admirable aspects (such as lynching) of the culture in which he lived, and he tended to be compatible in philosophy with the southern progressivism of his employer, the Atlanta Constitution, for which he wrote editorials. These and other characteristics of Stanton are well elaborated in the scholarly essays on him by Francis J. Bosha[21] and Bruce M. Swain.[22]
Shortly after his death Stanton was commemorated in the naming of the Frank Lebby Stanton Elementary School, which, after the redesignation of a street name for its eponym still unborn at the time of Stanton's death, is at 1625 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in Atlanta.[23]
Five items by Stanton appear in Edmund Clarence Stedman's American Anthology 1787-1900, published in 1900:[24]
"One Country" (Stedman's Item 1286)
"A Plantation Ditty" (Stedman's Item 1287)
"The Graveyard Rabbit" (Stedman's Item 1288)
"The Mocking-Bird" (Stedman's Item 1289)
"A Little Way" (Stedman's Item 1290)
One of Stanton's works most widely quoted during his lifetime was a quatrain titled "This World"; it is enscribed on his tombstone in Atlanta's Westview Cemetery:[25]
This world we're a'livin' in
Is mighty hard to beat.
You get a thorn with every rose.
But ain't the roses sweet?
MUSICAL SETTINGS OF HIS POETRY
Stanton collaborated with African American composer Harry Thacker Burleigh in the sheet music for his poem "Jean" (Burleigh composed and harmonized the tune).[26] American composers of art songs such as Ethelbert Nevin and Carrie Jacobs Bond wrote songs to his verses; composer Oley Speaks also set at least four of his poems to music: "The Hills of Dawn", "In Maytime", "Morning",[27] and "When Mabel Sings". Joshua Emdon set his famous "Keep-A' Goin'!"
REFERENCES
EXTERNAL LINKS
"Morning" w. Frank Lebby Stanton & m. Oley Speaks as sung by Webster Booth
"Morning" w. Frank Lebby Stanton & m. Oley Speaks as sung by Tessa Folch
"Morning" w. Frank Lebby Stanton & m. Oley Speaks as sung by Jan Peerce
"Morning" w. Frank Lebby Stanton & m. Oley Speaks as sung by Eleanor Steber
"Morning" w. Frank Lebby Stanton & m. Oley Speaks as sung by Richard Tucker
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My favorite American poet, the poet that got me to start writing poetry in a much more simpler form. Moving away from copying the flowery language of the famous and truly great 18th and early 19th century poets.
Trust me on this, writing good poetry in a much simpler style/form is far harder than doing so in flowery-image filled language that people are more accustomed to.--Tyr

Tyr-Ziu Saxnot
09-19-2015, 10:16 AM
More---


http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readbook_text/A_Study_of_American_Literature_1000621062/317


p.308 (317) p.309 (318)
THE NATIONAL EPOCH
sung to Dudley Buck's music. This opportunity for distinction in 1876 came to Lanier through the generous friendship of Bayard Taylor, and first made him widely known. But he had hardly begun to use in poetry the matured results of his scientific studies, when the struggle to live and breathe at all became hopeless. No life in our annals gives so profound an impression of rare genius never adequately revealed. There is relatively little, even in Lanier's small volume of verse, which can be of general interest. Perhaps such music as that of " Chattahoochee," compared with Tennyson's brook, will indicate that Lanier, had he lived, might have rivaled Swinburne in the harmonic and rhythmic effects of verse. " The Marshes of Glynn," we are told, can never be forgotten by a reader who knows also the actual sounds and lights of a Southern swamp. " How Love sought for Hell" is probably the clearest utterance of his lofty ethical convictions. He felt that he had, waiting for utterance, the noble truths which can alone justify the most melodious forms. Of that confidence he has perhaps left us less adequate justification in his verses than in prose, which includes some flashing critical analyses of William Morris, Swinburne, Whitman, and others.

It is no wonder that the most intensely and purely poetic voice from the Southland, in our own days, should cry to Lanier: " John Banister Tabb, 1845- " Ere Time's horizon-line was set, Somewhere in space our spirits met." Any soul to whom the ecstasy of lyric passion has ever come might well dream that he had met, or hope

LITERATURE OF THE SOUTH
yet to meet, in "wind-swept space," the dauntless, spotless soul of the soldier, musician, poet, and true lover, Sidney Lanier.

A most remarkable change of sectional allegiance is seen in the career of Albert Pike. Born in BosAlbert Pike, ton and educated at Harvard, he early became, ^^^^^^^i- through explorations, then through final choice, identified with the Southwest. His proslavery and anti- Yankee feelings are expressed in stirring verse and earnest prose. He not only served against Mexico in 1847, but later led a troop of Indians under the Confederate flag. His early environment is a curious gloss upon his song: " " For Dixie's land we take our stand, And live or die for Dixie 1 " In his tenderer and more dreamy moods he is a true poet. Mr. Stedman, who admires him, quotes, in the "Anthology," his "To the Mockingbird." Naturally, such a poem suffers by the comparison with the immortal "Nightingale" of Keats. Yet the Occidental bird's note is no mere echo, but a genuine and truly poetic utterance.

Except the throbbing, yet finished quatrains and sonnets of Father Tabb, which remind us of Landor's best cameos in verse, there is little in our latest poetry to be assigned to the South. The most popular singer to-day is Frank Stanton. A glance into Sted- Frank man's " Anthology " will discover sweet utterances g?^7 of his in at least three tones: national patriotism in 1857 " One Country," wedded love in " A Little Way " " paui and a "Plantation Ditty." Paul Dunbar, the negro Laurence poet, was born, long after the war, in Ohio.

I872-

APA: Lawton, William Cranston. (2013). pp. 308-9. A Study of American Literature. London: Forgotten Books. (Original work published 1907)
MLA: Lawton, William Cranston. A Study of American Literature. 1907. Reprint. London: Forgotten Books, 2013. 308-9. Print.