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Bilgerat
10-04-2015, 02:00 PM
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/83/1f/28/831f283fc5a455a93729633dfb84995b.jpg

This is the USS Simpson (FFG 56). Built in Bath Maine and launched in 1984.

Until 29 September, she shared one distinction with another naval vessel.

Both of them had sank an enemy vessel in action.

But she is now decommissioned, leaving but one commissioned vessel to hold that "honor"



This is the vessel:


http://www.militaryfactory.com/ships/imgs/uss-constitution_3.jpg

Tyr-Ziu Saxnot
10-04-2015, 02:17 PM
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/83/1f/28/831f283fc5a455a93729633dfb84995b.jpg

This is the USS Simpson (FFG 56). Built in Bath Maine and launched in 1984.

Until 29 September, she shared one distinction with another naval vessel.

Both of them had sank an enemy vessel in action.

But she is now decommissioned, leaving but one commissioned vessel to hold that "honor"



This is the vessel:


http://www.militaryfactory.com/ships/imgs/uss-constitution_3.jpg

Can we thank the obama for that reduction?--Tyr

Gunny
10-04-2015, 03:13 PM
We're going to run out of boats before he's done. I'd serve on that frigate in a minute. Except they don't have Marine detachments on frigates anymore. In case you missed it, I'm for bringing back the battleships. Most cost-efficient and effective artillery platform we ever had. It costs 1/100th the amount of money to use Naval gunfire instead of airstrikes.

aboutime
10-04-2015, 07:17 PM
Nothing unusual about this decommissioning. The navy has been retiring FRIGATES for many years. They have outlasted their repair, and potential life by now. Anything anyone wants to believe about them is standard these days. Obama had nothing to do with retiring this class of ship. They are just old, and require too much maintenance to keep up with the modern changes.

Bilgerat
10-04-2015, 07:37 PM
They are just old, and require too much maintenance to keep up with the modern changes.


I have a different "take" on these things

I enlisted in the Coast Guard in 1972. My first ship was the Cutter Sherman (WHEC 720)

She entered service in 1967 and is still patrolling the Bering Strait.

Another Cutter I had the pleasure of serving on was the Bittersweet (WLB 389)

She entered service in 1944 and was retired in 1997. BTW, she was transferred to Estonia and served them until 2014.

The Frigate Simpson entered service in 1984 and is retired because she's old?

aboutime
10-04-2015, 07:44 PM
I have a different "take" on these things

I enlisted in the Coast Guard in 1972. My first ship was the Cutter Sherman (WHEC 720)

She entered service in 1967 and is still patrolling the Bering Strait.

Another Cutter I had the pleasure of serving on was the Bittersweet (WLB 389)

She entered service in 1944 and was retired in 1997. BTW, she was transferred to Estonia and served them until 2014.

The Frigate Simpson entered service in 1984 and is retired because she's old?


YES. Exactly. See for yourself. Google Military.com, or just question Navy Frigates being retired.
I didn't make it up. Cutters in the C.G. are totally different, and you know it. I served on a DDG that was decommissioned after 20 years due to changes in Missile capabilities, and a Salvage ship that was comm'd during the 50's, but retired in the late 80's. Most of our Frigates have been sold to foreign nations. Not because I say so, but because they became rather useless, uncomfortable, and the engineering was using too much fossil fuel, rather than being converted to turbine which is more efficient, and less costly.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_Hazard_Perry-class_frigate

Perianne
10-04-2015, 07:48 PM
Do they cut up ships and reuse the parts when they are decommissioned? I would think there might be a lot of good equipment on those ships.

How thick is the steel on the outside of the ship, that is, the part that is in contact with the water? I don't know the proper terms for it.

Bilgerat
10-04-2015, 07:59 PM
Do they cut up ships and reuse the parts when they are decommissioned? I would think there might be a lot of good equipment on those ships.

How thick is the steel on the outside of the ship, that is, the part that is in contact with the water? I don't know the proper terms for it.


I know that the Coast Guard is "procuring" electronics from decommissioned Navy ships to keep the weapons systems going on it's vessels.

But the "usual" fate of can be found here; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Navy_reserve_fleets

Perianne
10-04-2015, 08:11 PM
I know that the Coast Guard is "procuring" electronics from decommissioned Navy ships to keep the weapons systems going on it's vessels.

But the "usual" fate of can be found here; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Navy_reserve_fleets

I would love to tour one of those old ships.

aboutime
10-04-2015, 08:48 PM
I know that the Coast Guard is "procuring" electronics from decommissioned Navy ships to keep the weapons systems going on it's vessels.

But the "usual" fate of can be found here; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Navy_reserve_fleets


Not trying to be a smartass, but those mothballed, so called "Reserve Fleet" ships, will never be reactivated.
It would simply be too expensive, and time consuming to do so. And, considering our DEBT is closing in on 20 Trillion dollars, not to mention all of the cutbacks taking place....it's just not gonna be.
Why would I tell you something I know to be untrue? Maybe the coast guard is doing as you say, but think about what they ARE NOT procuring. I learned just a little bit during my 30 years on many, many ships, and as an Instructor for a short period on Naval History.

Bilgerat
10-04-2015, 09:32 PM
think about what they ARE NOT procuring.

I can state that the Coast Guard has (for MANY years) been sort of the "red headed step child".

We have but two ice breakers, the Polar Star (commissioned in 1976) and the Cutter Healy (commissioned in 1999). Of the two, The Polar Star is by far the more powerful vessel.

And there is the Polar Sea, but she suffered catastrophic damage to five of her six Alco Main Diesel Engine engines. She has been placed in a limbo status, pending a decision of building a new class of heavy ice breaker.

We had a "Wind" class breaker, built in the 40's and used for years. The history of those can be seen here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wind-class_icebreaker#USCGC_Northwind_.28WAGB-282.29


I would dearly love to see a new class built (the Russians are challenging our rights in the ice) and that class would be better served if they were nuclear powered. :salute:

namvet
10-05-2015, 06:14 PM
http://www.militaryfactory.com/ships/imgs/uss-constitution_3.jpg

off topic just found my new wallpaper

Gunny
10-05-2015, 11:04 PM
Not trying to be a smartass, but those mothballed, so called "Reserve Fleet" ships, will never be reactivated.
It would simply be too expensive, and time consuming to do so. And, considering our DEBT is closing in on 20 Trillion dollars, not to mention all of the cutbacks taking place....it's just not gonna be.
Why would I tell you something I know to be untrue? Maybe the coast guard is doing as you say, but think about what they ARE NOT procuring. I learned just a little bit during my 30 years on many, many ships, and as an Instructor for a short period on Naval History.

You're probably right. It's a shame.

namvet
10-06-2015, 08:45 AM
Not trying to be a smartass, but those mothballed, so called "Reserve Fleet" ships, will never be reactivated.
It would simply be too expensive, and time consuming to do so. And, considering our DEBT is closing in on 20 Trillion dollars, not to mention all of the cutbacks taking place....it's just not gonna be.
Why would I tell you something I know to be untrue? Maybe the coast guard is doing as you say, but think about what they ARE NOT procuring. I learned just a little bit during my 30 years on many, many ships, and as an Instructor for a short period on Naval History.

most all are sold for scrap. they did rescue the Iowa which is now on display. we used to make trips to pack rat fleet and stripped em for parts.

http://i62.tinypic.com/25qf506.jpg

Bilgerat
10-06-2015, 08:58 AM
we used to make trips to pack rat fleet and stripped em for parts.


Oh yes, there was that time in my past :salute:

Twas at the Yards in Curtis Bay Md. A recently retired Coast Guard Cutter was waiting to be towed out to it's new owner.

A midnight trip was made by the engineering staff and items were "procured" for our stores :laugh: