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namvet
04-12-2016, 08:00 PM
http://i64.tinypic.com/2exsiyr.jpg

There are the heroes we know and there are the unseen heroes who ensure those fallen warriors who have given the last full measure of devotion are honored to the last moment — their final resting.

This is truly a brotherhood and sisterhood many will never understand. There is nothing to add to this story except tears.

The picture you see on this page was taken behind the scenes at Dover Air Force Base where the bodies of fallen soldiers are prepared for burial. And that includes being properly dressed, all the way down to the smallest detail.

In this picture Staff Sgt. Miguel Deynes is making sure the uniform is just right for an army pilot recently killed in Afghanistan.

There is a very specific process once a fallen soldier is returned home.

The bodies are flown back to the U.S. on a cargo jet. A team of service members wearing white gloves carries the coffins, covered with flags, to a white van that takes them to the Armed Forces Medical Examiner.

The remains are washed, the hands are scrubbed clean, and the hair is shampooed. If necessary bones are wired together and damaged tissue is reconstructed with flesh-toned wax.

Sometimes they will use photos, sometimes just intuition to recreate the wrinkles in faces, and the lines around the mouth or the corner of the eyes.

“It has to look normal, like someone who is sleeping.”

Once the body is ready then the uniform is prepared. That includes putting medals in the proper order on the ribbon rack above the jacket’s breast pocket.

During the height of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan 10 to 20 bodies were arriving every day.

The embalmers often worked all night to get the bodies home on time. That can take an emotional toll so the mortuary has a large gym so workers can blow off steam.

Many say they are haunted by how young the fallen soldiers are, and by how many of them leave behind small children.

That’s why Sgt. Deynes says they are advised not to do research into the backgrounds of the soldiers.

“If I knew the story of every individual who went through here, I would probably be in a padded cell.”

The dress uniform being prepared in this particular case will be in a closed casket.

Even so, it will be perfectly tailored, starched and pressed. Everything will be checked down to the last detail.

Sgt. Deynes says, “They’re (the family) not going to see it. I do it for myself. It’s more than an honor. It’s a blessing to dress that soldier for the last time.”

Rest in peace, steadfast and loyal.

Reprinted with permission: AllenBWest.com :salute:

link (http://www.thefederalistpapers.org/us/heartbreaking-the-story-of-those-who-dress-fallen-warriors-for-eternity)

Gunny
04-12-2016, 09:39 PM
http://i64.tinypic.com/2exsiyr.jpg

There are the heroes we know and there are the unseen heroes who ensure those fallen warriors who have given the last full measure of devotion are honored to the last moment — their final resting.

This is truly a brotherhood and sisterhood many will never understand. There is nothing to add to this story except tears.

The picture you see on this page was taken behind the scenes at Dover Air Force Base where the bodies of fallen soldiers are prepared for burial. And that includes being properly dressed, all the way down to the smallest detail.

In this picture Staff Sgt. Miguel Deynes is making sure the uniform is just right for an army pilot recently killed in Afghanistan.

There is a very specific process once a fallen soldier is returned home.

The bodies are flown back to the U.S. on a cargo jet. A team of service members wearing white gloves carries the coffins, covered with flags, to a white van that takes them to the Armed Forces Medical Examiner.

The remains are washed, the hands are scrubbed clean, and the hair is shampooed. If necessary bones are wired together and damaged tissue is reconstructed with flesh-toned wax.

Sometimes they will use photos, sometimes just intuition to recreate the wrinkles in faces, and the lines around the mouth or the corner of the eyes.

“It has to look normal, like someone who is sleeping.”

Once the body is ready then the uniform is prepared. That includes putting medals in the proper order on the ribbon rack above the jacket’s breast pocket.

During the height of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan 10 to 20 bodies were arriving every day.

The embalmers often worked all night to get the bodies home on time. That can take an emotional toll so the mortuary has a large gym so workers can blow off steam.

Many say they are haunted by how young the fallen soldiers are, and by how many of them leave behind small children.

That’s why Sgt. Deynes says they are advised not to do research into the backgrounds of the soldiers.

“If I knew the story of every individual who went through here, I would probably be in a padded cell.”

The dress uniform being prepared in this particular case will be in a closed casket.

Even so, it will be perfectly tailored, starched and pressed. Everything will be checked down to the last detail.

Sgt. Deynes says, “They’re (the family) not going to see it. I do it for myself. It’s more than an honor. It’s a blessing to dress that soldier for the last time.”

Rest in peace, steadfast and loyal.

Reprinted with permission: AllenBWest.com :salute:

link (http://www.thefederalistpapers.org/us/heartbreaking-the-story-of-those-who-dress-fallen-warriors-for-eternity)

My hat's off to them. :salute: No f-ing way in Hell. I hate death and the smell of it. I'd be insane doing just one tour of that sh*t. Guess my balls run in a different direction. I couldn't do it.

namvet
04-12-2016, 09:58 PM
My hat's off to them. :salute: No f-ing way in Hell. I hate death and the smell of it. I'd be insane doing just one tour of that sh*t. Guess my balls run in a different direction. I couldn't do it.

mine to. I can't feature going home after just 1 day. not all hero's are at the front. a lot of these patriots wind up in section 60 at Arlington

Gunny
04-12-2016, 10:08 PM
mine to. I can't feature going home after just 1 day. not all hero's are at the front. a lot of these patriots wind up in section 60 at Arlington

Yeah there ain't no damned way. I worked on summer on the 4th floor in the Baptist Hospital (one-way trip for patients). I was so freakin' depressed by the time that job was done my wife was trying to make me go to counseling. I make dead bodies. I don't play with them.

War story time: I would never touch them. My corporals would search them while I stood watch over them. I hate dead bodies and won't touch one. You'd have to court martial and shoot me first. I get the creeps just thinking about it.

Next war story: when I was stationed at HQMC in the Navy Annex, Arlington is right across the road. We used to watch the funerals all the time. Waxing philosophical, I always wondered what memories were lost.

Elessar
04-12-2016, 10:18 PM
There are the heroes we know and there are the unseen heroes who ensure those fallen warriors who have given the last full measure of devotion are honored to the last moment — their final resting.

Reprinted with permission: AllenBWest.com :salute:

link (http://www.thefederalistpapers.org/us/heartbreaking-the-story-of-those-who-dress-fallen-warriors-for-eternity)

Oh...My...God!

That is so Reverently touching.

May God or Our Creator touch those gentle hearts that do this
for our brothers, sisters, and their loved ones. :salute:

namvet
04-12-2016, 10:23 PM
Yeah there ain't no damned way. I worked on summer on the 4th floor in the Baptist Hospital (one-way trip for patients). I was so freakin' depressed by the time that job was done my wife was trying to make me go to counseling. I make dead bodies. I don't play with them.

War story time: I would never touch them. My corporals would search them while I stood watch over them. I hate dead bodies and won't touch one. You'd have to court martial and shoot me first. I get the creeps just thinking about it.

Next war story: when I was stationed at HQMC in the Navy Annex, Arlington is right across the road. We used to watch the funerals all the time. Waxing philosophical, I always wondered what memories were lost.

IMO they should ask the family if they want a casket or an urn. cremation's the way to go then just send that and his clothes home and they have the memories of how he used to be instead of..............

Elessar
04-12-2016, 10:25 PM
War story time: I would never touch them. My corporals would search them while I stood watch over them. I hate dead bodies and won't touch one. You'd have to court martial and shoot me first. I get the creeps just thinking about it.


I have pulled quite a few out of the water, and dispatched other Coasties to respond to persons in distress that turn up dead.
None of them are pleasant....
Don't need to be in a battle zone to dislike it.

In your case, likely was platoon members.

My case it was just people...

Semper Fi / Semper Paratis

Gunny
04-12-2016, 10:57 PM
Oh...My...God!

That is so Reverently touching.

May God or Our Creator touch those gentle hearts that do this
for our brothers, sisters, and their loved ones. :salute:

Amen. Some people think we don't care about what they do, but we know.

Gunny
04-13-2016, 02:10 AM
mine to. I can't feature going home after just 1 day. not all hero's are at the front. a lot of these patriots wind up in section 60 at Arlington

I was trying to not drag this out, but them, I'm me. I am one of the few the proud, and no one in my unit was allowed to pick on service personnel. I'm water survival qualified which means I got about 8 hours or so. You and your cutter better show the f*ck up. I'm going to need a lift.

I've always thought it was weird everyone wants to claim to be a frontline troop. I got ONE job. Kill and break shit. And I didn't choose the job. But you won't hear me denigrating support personnel. AT ain't my favorite player and I know I ain't his but when I call the ship I ain't talking to God. I expect AT to lay down some lead right on the grid coordinates I give him. We can argue and fistfight in a bar in Thailand.

The people that support us are as much heroes as anything we are. We couldn't do our jobs without them. And I STILL ain't screwing with no dead friggin' bodies. :laugh:

darin
04-13-2016, 03:19 AM
I've always thought it was weird everyone wants to claim to be a frontline troop. I got ONE job. Kill and break shit. And I didn't choose the job. But you won't hear me denigrating support personnel.

The people that support us are as much heroes as anything we are. We couldn't do our jobs without them. And I STILL ain't screwing with no dead friggin' bodies. :laugh:

People have low value of self - they steal valor in many ways. ONE way they steal is to say trigger words. Yes trigger words.

To me, a Trigger (that I want to punch them in the throat) are things like this:

"I was combat (insert ANY MOS/JOB other than Engineer)__________. " I knew a guy who claimed he was Combat Commo. That's not an MOS. He was a Radio repair guy assigned to a commo shop of an Infantry Battalion. He was Commo. 31C at the time. That wasn't good enough so he called it 'combat commo'. Pussy.

"I can't tell you what I did - it's classified." Classified as WHAT? "Classified" is NOT a 'Classification'. Plus. PLUS. ANYONE doing some Secret Squirrel shit for real doesn't say "I was doing Secret missions". They say "I was a Soldier(marine, etc). We (the unit) deployed in support of operations in (whatever general AO). And that would be the most of it. ANYONE - I shit you not - ANYONE who comes up to you at a bar and or a party and says "I can't TELL YOU...because I was Fucking 007 in ACUs! We did ALL kinds of TOP SECRET SHIT! SO MUCH Secret that I shouldn't even be telling you!" But you ARE telling people - that means you're full of shit. Go away.

You hit the nail on the head WRT support folk. What's the old saying? Takes 20 support folk for one Infantry bloke? The deal is - the Army is a system. Contractors, Family Members, Civilians, Soldiers. Everyone has their finger in the pie - a pie called Death and Destruction to our Enemies (as long as our Elected "leaders" don't neuter our Forces).

Kathianne
04-13-2016, 05:20 AM
Oh...My...God!

That is so Reverently touching.

May God or Our Creator touch those gentle hearts that do this
for our brothers, sisters, and their loved ones. :salute:

The families are grateful.

Gunny
04-13-2016, 09:02 AM
People have low value of self - they steal valor in many ways. ONE way they steal is to say trigger words. Yes trigger words.

To me, a Trigger (that I want to punch them in the throat) are things like this:

"I was combat (insert ANY MOS/JOB other than Engineer)__________. " I knew a guy who claimed he was Combat Commo. That's not an MOS. He was a Radio repair guy assigned to a commo shop of an Infantry Battalion. He was Commo. 31C at the time. That wasn't good enough so he called it 'combat commo'. Pussy.

"I can't tell you what I did - it's classified." Classified as WHAT? "Classified" is NOT a 'Classification'. Plus. PLUS. ANYONE doing some Secret Squirrel shit for real doesn't say "I was doing Secret missions". They say "I was a Soldier(marine, etc). We (the unit) deployed in support of operations in (whatever general AO). And that would be the most of it. ANYONE - I shit you not - ANYONE who comes up to you at a bar and or a party and says "I can't TELL YOU...because I was Fucking 007 in ACUs! We did ALL kinds of TOP SECRET SHIT! SO MUCH Secret that I shouldn't even be telling you!" But you ARE telling people - that means you're full of shit. Go away.

You hit the nail on the head WRT support folk. What's the old saying? Takes 20 support folk for one Infantry bloke? The deal is - the Army is a system. Contractors, Family Members, Civilians, Soldiers. Everyone has their finger in the pie - a pie called Death and Destruction to our Enemies (as long as our Elected "leaders" don't neuter our Forces).

I've honestly never understood it. And trust me, I'd rather have been in the rear with the gear. I needed food, pay, mail and comm and I relied on others to provide it. They went through boot camp same as me and wore the same uniform. I knew grunts that were p*ssies and I'd have traded them in for some of the RASC guys I knew any damned day. They spent their tours with me on mess, guard and/or maintenance or ship's platoon. I can make you go away for 9 months every year.

I always love the "I can't tell you" line. :laugh: When I used to frequent bars everyone was a SEAL or Green Beret. Been MY experience that a SEAL or Green Beret were the last ones to tell you what they were. I honestly in Rl never told anyone anything but I was a Marine. Y'all on this board know more about me than anyone I've known in RL. There ARE things we can't say. You sign the disclaimer when you retire. But you don't need to stamp it on your forehead. I personally have had to bite my tongue on message boards not saying things I know when some jackoff is trying to tell me my business.

I've honestly never knocked support personnel for the very reason of this thread. I ain't playing with dead bodies. Somebody else has to do it, but it's got to be done. You put me on the other side of the counter in a supply warehouse, guess who's lost? Stick me in the LFOC and you're just wasting tax dollars. They do what they do. Long as I get my bullets and beans and mail, they wear the same boots I do.

darin
04-13-2016, 09:10 AM
When I was a Stinger team leader and f'd up I would get an ass-chewing by my E6 squad leader - and MAYBE my platoon leader if it was bad. When I went to work in a personnel office - Corps G1 - and I messed up I would get chewed out by my SGM, probably two Majors and a LTC. While the Stinger work was harder physically, the stakes can be much higher as a Rear-eschelon-mother-fucker (REMF).

So - which would I rather be?

Back in garrison I'd rather work in the HQ. In the field I'd rather be on line - actually doing Soldiering and killing and all that.

:)

Gunny
04-13-2016, 09:24 AM
When I was a Stinger team leader and f'd up I would get an ass-chewing by my E6 squad leader - and MAYBE my platoon leader if it was bad. When I went to work in a personnel office - Corps G1 - and I messed up I would get chewed out by my SGM, probably two Majors and a LTC. While the Stinger work was harder physically, the stakes can be much higher as a Rear-eschelon-mother-fucker (REMF).

So - which would I rather be?

Back in garrison I'd rather work in the HQ. In the field I'd rather be on line - actually doing Soldiering and killing and all that.

:)

It's not a which would you rather be. I'm a warrior. I didn't choose it. You use people for what they are good at. I rarely use the term REMF and when I do, it's individually. If and when I call for support, I want it on the damned dime. If I had to turn on AT's radio I'm sure I could screw it up. In turn, I wouldn't drag him out in the swamp with a rifle. You do your job and I do mine.

I hated being in the rear with a passion. All those damned inspections and pretty boy crap. I'd rather be on line than play dress up.

darin
04-13-2016, 09:25 AM
I hated being in the rear with a passion.


Gay.


I use REMF because I was one. It's a term of endearment.

Gunny
04-13-2016, 09:41 AM
Gay.


I use REMF because I was one. It's a term of endearment.

You can be whatever you want. Just don't call me gay. The end of the world will happen before that crap. I use the term "support personnel" out of respect. REMF is disrespectful IMO, and was meant to be so. I know what people on the line say. They're just stupid enough to think they'd be on line without support.

Don't sell yourself short.

darin
04-13-2016, 09:45 AM
You can be whatever you want. Just don't call me gay. The end of the world will happen before that crap. I use the term "support personnel" out of respect. REMF is disrespectful IMO, and was meant to be so. I know what people on the line say. They're just stupid enough to think they'd be on line without support.

Don't sell yourself short.

I take as much pride in my service - both former and current - as anyone. But I was still a REMF. For a time. Now...I guess I'm even MORE REMF; although lots of my peers deploy.

:)

Thank you though. Got it. Don't hug me.

Elessar
04-13-2016, 01:34 PM
People have low value of self - they steal valor in many ways. ONE way they steal is to say trigger words. Yes trigger words.


"I can't tell you what I did - it's classified." Classified as WHAT? "Classified" is NOT a 'Classification'. Plus. PLUS. ANYONE doing some Secret Squirrel shit for real doesn't say "I was doing Secret missions". They say "I was a Soldier(marine, etc). We (the unit) deployed in support of operations in (whatever general AO). And that would be the most of it. ANYONE - I shit you not - ANYONE who comes up to you at a bar and or a party and says "I can't TELL YOU...because I was Fucking 007 in ACUs! We did ALL kinds of TOP SECRET SHIT! SO MUCH Secret that I shouldn't even be telling you!" But you ARE telling people - that means you're full of shit. Go away.

You hit the nail on the head WRT support folk. What's the old saying? Takes 20 support folk for one Infantry bloke? The deal is - the Army is a system. Contractors, Family Members, Civilians, Soldiers. Everyone has their finger in the pie - a pie called Death and Destruction to our Enemies (as long as our Elected "leaders" don't neuter our Forces).

I can not, or will not refute anything you and the Gunny say.
Combat was not my realm, but Search and Rescue was...and
so was Maritime Law Enforcement.

There are some things in MLE I just cannot speak of,
and that should be respected.

Elessar
04-13-2016, 01:38 PM
I always love the "I can't tell you" line. :laugh: When I used to frequent bars everyone was a SEAL or Green Beret. Been MY experience that a SEAL or Green Beret were the last ones to tell you what they were. I honestly in Rl never told anyone anything but I was a Marine.



I've seen that many times. It is really disgusting.

Gunny
04-13-2016, 05:00 PM
I can not, or will not refute anything you and the Gunny say.
Combat was not my realm, but Search and Rescue was...and
so was Maritime Law Enforcement.

There are some things in MLE I just cannot speak of,
and that should be respected.

It's respected by those of us that know it. Just not Hillary and some other dimbulbs. We aren't special like her. We open our mouths and its Leavenworth for us.

You can have that SAR crap. If you think combat is more dangerous than THAT, someone's misled you. A firefight might last 30-60 seconds. We ain't fastroping on a cable and winch into a churning ocean under 30 knot winds only to have some moron victim just about drown your ass while you try and save them. And I ain't riding in any more damned boats through hurricanes. Sure as Hell not to save some weenie who's been warned for days a hurricane is coming. Gee, what part of "HURRICANE IS COMING" did you miss? "Duh, I wanted to see the storm". Great plan. You just endangered the lives of a crew to save your stupid ass.

You can trust that none of us that grew up around and/or lived in the water will ever sell you short.

hjmick
04-13-2016, 06:31 PM
Much respect to a group of people doing a job I could never do.


This subject reminded of a movie about those who accompany fallen soldiers on their last trip home, Taking Chance. Stars Kevin Bacon, it was made for HBO. Damn good film. Based on actual events...


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1019454/?ref_=nv_sr_5

Kathianne
04-13-2016, 06:43 PM
Much respect to a group of people doing a job I could never do.


This subject reminded of a movie about those who accompany fallen soldiers on their last trip home, Taking Chance. Stars Kevin Bacon, it was made for HBO. Damn good film. Based on actual events...


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1019454/?ref_=nv_sr_5

I remember reading and posting this story which the movie was based on. It was very emotional:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-050123strobl-story.html

Gunny
04-13-2016, 06:43 PM
Much respect to a group of people doing a job I could never do.


This subject reminded of a movie about those who accompany fallen soldiers on their last trip home, Taking Chance. Stars Kevin Bacon, it was made for HBO. Damn good film. Based on actual events...


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1019454/?ref_=nv_sr_5

At least they're in boxes but you can have THAT job too. The worst thing I had to do I think in my life was tell Jimmy's wife he was dead. Then I had to tell her I gave the order than got him shot. My Capt was a wuss and wouldn't do it (Worst zero I ever served under). He'd been my roommate in 29 Palms and Oki. He was like 6"4 and always trying to outlift me in the weightroom. :laugh: I bodyslammed him once in the volleyball pit and he said I couldn't do it again so I did. :)

We had some GOOD times and THAT is what I prefer to remember. Otherwise, I'm a Baptist with Baptist guilt and I got him killed. Should have seen that dipsh*t when he fell overboard. Dumb f*cker. :laugh:

namvet
04-13-2016, 07:05 PM
Much respect to a group of people doing a job I could never do.


This subject reminded of a movie about those who accompany fallen soldiers on their last trip home, Taking Chance. Stars Kevin Bacon, it was made for HBO. Damn good film. Based on actual events...


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1019454/?ref_=nv_sr_5

thanks for the post hjmick i don't get HBO so i never saw it. wonder if it ever made the theaters ?? ill check into getting the DVD

Elessar
04-13-2016, 07:07 PM
It's respected by those of us that know it. Just not Hillary and some other dimbulbs. We aren't special like her. We open our mouths and its Leavenworth for us.

You can have that SAR crap. If you think combat is more dangerous than THAT, someone's misled you. A firefight might last 30-60 seconds. We ain't fastroping on a cable and winch into a churning ocean under 30 knot winds only to have some moron victim just about drown your ass while you try and save them. And I ain't riding in any more damned boats through hurricanes. Sure as Hell not to save some weenie who's been warned for days a hurricane is coming. Gee, what part of "HURRICANE IS COMING" did you miss? "Duh, I wanted to see the storm". Great plan. You just endangered the lives of a crew to save your stupid ass.

You can trust that none of us that grew up around and/or lived in the water will ever sell you short.

I did not fly, but was a SAR Boat Coxswain and station OOD.

Then became a SAR Controller (and LE) at 3 different Command Centers.
I had to send boat and air crews out for rescues and assistance. I worried
beyond imagination over the safely of those crews when weather was shitty.

My last duty station, as a GS-11, I met the aircrews on the tarmac when they
returned....not just a debrief, but to show I honored their efforts.

Gunny
04-13-2016, 07:34 PM
I did not fly, but was a SAR Boat Coxswain and station OOD.

Then became a SAR Controller (and LE) at 3 different Command Centers.
I had to send boat and air crews out for rescues and assistance. I worried
beyond imagination over the safely of those crews when weather was shitty.

My last duty station, as a GS-11, I met the aircrews on the tarmac when they
returned....not just a debrief, but to show I honored their efforts.

Like I said, I like to remember the humorous crap. Like picking the biggest SEAL they could come up with for me to drag across the pool in a sidestroke. Then calling foul when we got to the shallow end in 3 feet of water. I'm almost 6' tall, f*ckers. You give me someone that weighs 250 pounds, make me wear boots and utes and think my feet AIN'T going to touch deck? I'm not sure what math class YOU took .... :laugh:

And I hated Little Creek. They just dumped your a$$ in the ocean there. There ain't no damned bottom.

It's all good though. I hated and loved every minute of it. What I can't stand are those that disrespect us. We do dirty-ass jobs and they make us sound like the bad guys. None of my Marines did anything but their job. And some d*ckhead here in the world wants to question them? F*ck off.

And you might want to honor those that serve you and give you the right to run your mouth. These a$$es think they're entitled and have ZERO respect for first responders. Superman ain't coming to save you, MF-er. It's usually a squid or a Marine. And we don't wear capes. I can't stand unappreciative people. They just suck.

That's somebody's little boy that just got brought home in a bag, dirtwad. Show some respect.

Elessar
04-13-2016, 07:47 PM
It's all good though. I hated and loved every minute of it. What I can't stand are those that disrespect us. We do dirty-ass jobs and they make us sound like the bad guys. None of my Marines did anything but their job. And some d*ckhead here in the world wants to question them? F*ck off.

And you might want to honor those that serve you and give you the right to run your mouth. These a$$es think they're entitled and have ZERO respect for first responders.

I had Marine crews respond without question to a few cases.....damned devoted and focused professionals. They were
in their river assault boats. I coordinated a response to an LCAC that lost it's skirt between Catalina and Camp Pendelton.
The FACSFAC watch did not give a shit, but the Master Gunny at Camp P sure did. Told me on the phone that he ripped
them a new asshole.

Gunny
04-13-2016, 09:26 PM
I had Marine crews respond without question to a few cases.....damned devoted and focused professionals. They were
in their river assault boats. I coordinated a response to an LCAC that lost it's skirt between Catalina and Camp Pendelton.
The FACSFAC watch did not give a shit, but the Master Gunny at Camp P sure did. Told me on the phone that he ripped
them a new asshole.

I got to spread some around. Don't f*ck with Master Gunny's. They live to be pissed at something. :laugh: