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Gunny
06-29-2016, 01:05 PM
We need to start killing these people back. It ain't about gun control. It's about controlling your damned weapon. We need to keep them out of our yard and kill them in theirs. This shit's getting old. Orlando. Istanbul. What's it take for the left to get a clue? Ignoring the problem doesn't make the problem go away.

Black Diamond
06-29-2016, 01:38 PM
The leaders of the "free" world are not willing to take the necessary steps to prevent these incidents.

Drummond
06-30-2016, 04:33 AM
We need to start killing these people back. It ain't about gun control. It's about controlling your damned weapon. We need to keep them out of our yard and kill them in theirs. This shit's getting old. Orlando. Istanbul. What's it take for the left to get a clue? Ignoring the problem doesn't make the problem go away.

The Left sees reality in its own terms, and nobody else's ... no matter how delusional their perception of it is.

Orlando, Istanbul, etc etc ... the Left have their mindset, and their political imperatives. Nothing will make them stray from any of that. Worse, they insist that everyone else sees things as they do.

This is a part of why they can never be trusted with power. Do you let the lunatics rule the asylum ?

And this is the point anyway. Guns don't kill .. people do. Of course.

fj1200
06-30-2016, 09:21 AM
We need to start killing these people back. It ain't about gun control. It's about controlling your damned weapon. We need to keep them out of our yard and kill them in theirs. This shit's getting old. Orlando. Istanbul. What's it take for the left to get a clue? Ignoring the problem doesn't make the problem go away.

Umm, we have. A bunch more of late.


The leaders of the "free" world are not willing to take the necessary steps to prevent these incidents.

What are those steps?

Black Diamond
06-30-2016, 10:36 AM
Umm, we have. A bunch more of late.



What are those steps?

Stop allowing terrorists into their countries for starters.

Atticus Finch
06-30-2016, 11:51 AM
Read how General "Black Jack" Pershing handled the radical Muzzie problem.

http://urbanlegends.about.com/od/historical/fl/Gen-Black-Jack-Pershing-vs-Muslim-Terrorists.htm

Gunny
06-30-2016, 12:18 PM
Umm, we have. A bunch more of late.



What are those steps?

Sure. Because we let them in.

fj1200
06-30-2016, 12:29 PM
Stop allowing terrorists into their countries for starters.

Excellent plan.


Sure. Because we let them in.

We've been killing them in other countries because we let them in? :confused:

Black Diamond
06-30-2016, 12:43 PM
Excellent plan.



We've been killing them in other countries because we let them in? :confused:

I said "for starters". :cool:

The West is going to pay for the Syrian refugee decision, as well as the Iran nuclear deal. For starters.

fj1200
06-30-2016, 12:49 PM
I said "for starters". :cool:

The West is going to pay for the Syrian refugee decision, as well as the Iran nuclear deal. For starters.

As I said, excellent plan.

Tyr-Ziu Saxnot
06-30-2016, 02:34 PM
The leaders of the "free" world are not willing to take the necessary steps to prevent these incidents.



Here is how to handle the muslim scourge--these Tripoli pirates were muslims..
As such they only respect a superior force being brought against them and by that I do not mean a superior force that restrains and limits itself, as America under "their current man obama" now does !--Tyr



Barbary corsairs and crews from the North African Ottoman provinces of Algiers, Tunis, Tripoli, and the independent Sultanate of Morocco under the Alaouite dynasty (the Barbary Coast) were the scourge of the Mediterranean.

^^^^^^ AS I SAID, THEY WERE MUSLIMS.... same as the muslim terrorists today..-Tyr




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Barbary_War


Barbary corsairs and crews from the North African Ottoman provinces of Algiers, Tunis, Tripoli, and the independent Sultanate of Morocco under the Alaouite dynasty (the Barbary Coast) were the scourge of the Mediterranean.[4] Capturing merchant ships and enslaving or ransoming their crews provided the Muslim rulers of these nations with wealth and naval power. The Roman Catholic Trinitarian Order, or order of "Mathurins", had operated from France for centuries with the special mission of collecting and disbursing funds for the relief and ransom of prisoners of Mediterranean pirates. According to Robert Davis, between 1 and 1.25 million Europeans were captured by Barbary pirates and sold as slaves between the 16th and 19th centuries.[5]

Barbary corsairs led attacks upon American merchant shipping in an attempt to extort ransom for the lives of captured sailors, and ultimately tribute from the United States to avoid further attacks, as they did with the various European states.[6] Before the Treaty of Paris, which formalized the United States' independence from Great Britain, U.S. shipping was protected by France during the revolutionary years under the Treaty of Alliance (1778–83). Although the treaty does not mention the Barbary States in name, it refers to common enemies between both the U.S. and France. As such, piracy against U.S. shipping only began to occur after the end of the American Revolution, when the U.S. government lost its protection under the Treaty of Alliance.

This lapse of protection by a European power led to the first American merchant ship being seized after the Treaty of Paris. On 11 October 1784, Moroccan pirates seized the brigantine Betsey.[7] The Spanish government negotiated the freedom of the captured ship and crew; however, Spain offered advice to the United States on how to deal with the Barbary States. The advice was to offer tribute to prevent further attacks against merchant ships. The U.S. Minister to France, Thomas Jefferson, decided to send envoys to Morocco and Algeria to try to purchase treaties and the freedom of the captured sailors held by Algeria.[8] Morocco was the first Barbary Coast State to sign a treaty with the U.S., on 23 June 1786. This treaty formally ended all Moroccan piracy against American shipping interests. Specifically, article six of the treaty states that if any Americans captured by Moroccans or other Barbary Coast States docked at a Moroccan city, they would be set free and come under the protection of the Moroccan State.[9]

American diplomatic action with Algeria, the other major Barbary Coast State, was much less productive than with Morocco. Algeria began piracy against the U.S. on 25 July 1785 with the capture of the schooner Maria, and Dauphin a week later.[10] All four Barbary Coast states demanded $660,000 each. However, the envoys were given only an allocated budget of $40,000 to achieve peace.[11] Diplomatic talks to reach a reasonable sum for tribute or for the ransom of the captured sailors struggled to make any headway. The crews of Maria and Dauphin remained in captivity for over a decade, and soon were joined by crews of other ships captured by the Barbary States.[12]
Captain William Bainbridge paying tribute to the Dey of Algiers, 1800
[show]

v t e

First Barbary War

In 1795, Algeria came to an agreement that resulted in the release of 115 American sailors they held, at a cost of over $1 million. This amount totaled about one-sixth of the entire U.S. budget,[13] and was demanded as tribute by the Barbary States to prevent further piracy. The continuing demand for tribute ultimately led to the formation of the United States Department of the Navy, founded in 1798[14] to prevent further attacks upon American shipping and to end the demands for extremely large tributes from the Barbary States.

Various letters and testimonies by captured sailors describe their captivity as a form of slavery, even though Barbary Coast imprisonment was different from that practiced by the U.S. and European powers of the time.[15] Barbary Coast prisoners were able to obtain wealth and property, along with achieving status beyond that of a slave. One such example was James Leander Cathcart, who rose to the highest position a Christian slave could achieve in Algeria, becoming an adviser to the bey (governor).[16] Even so, most captives were pressed into hard labor in the service of the Barbary pirates, and struggled under extremely poor conditions that exposed them to vermin and disease. As word of their treatment reached the U.S., through freed captives' narratives and letters, Americans pushed for direct government action to stop the piracy against U.S. ships.
1816 illustration of Christian slaves

In March 1786, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams went to London to negotiate with Tripoli's envoy, ambassador Sidi Haji Abdrahaman (or Sidi Haji Abdul Rahman Adja). When they enquired "concerning the ground of the pretensions to make war upon nations who had done them no injury", the ambassador replied:

"It was written in their Koran, that all nations which had not acknowledged the Prophet were sinners, whom it was the right and duty of the faithful to plunder and enslave; and that every mussulman who was slain in this warfare was sure to go to paradise. He said, also, that the man who was the first to board a vessel had one slave over and above his share, and that when they sprang to the deck of an enemy's ship, every sailor held a dagger in each hand and a third in his mouth; which usually struck such terror into the foe that they cried out for quarter at once." [23]

Jefferson reported the conversation to Secretary of Foreign Affairs John Jay, who submitted the ambassador's comments and offer to Congress. Jefferson argued that paying tribute would encourage more attacks. Although John Adams agreed with Jefferson, he believed that circumstances forced the U.S. to pay tribute until an adequate navy could be built. The U.S. had just fought an exhausting war, which put the nation deep in debt. Federalist and Anti-Federalist forces argued over the needs of the country and the burden of taxation. Jefferson's own Democratic-Republicans and anti-navalists believed that the future of the country lay in westward expansion, with Atlantic trade threatening to siphon money and energy away from the new nation, to be spent on wars in the Old World.[24] The U.S. paid Algiers the ransom, and continued to pay up to $1 million per year over the next 15 years for the safe passage of American ships and the return of American hostages.[citation needed] A $1 million payment in ransom and tribute to the privateering states amounted to approximately 10% of the U.S. government's annual revenues in 1800.[25]

Jefferson continued to argue for cessation of the tribute, with rising support from George Washington and others. With the recommissioning of the American Navy in 1794 and the resulting increased firepower on the seas, it became increasingly possible for America to refuse paying tribute, although by now the long-standing habit was hard to overturn.
Declaration of war and naval blockade

Just before Jefferson's inauguration in 1801, Congress passed naval legislation that, among other things, provided for six frigates that 'shall be officered and manned as the President of the United States may direct.' ... In the event of a declaration of war on the United States by the Barbary powers, these ships were to 'protect our commerce and chastise their insolence—by sinking, burning or destroying their ships and vessels wherever you shall find them.'"[26] On Jefferson's inauguration as president in 1801, Yusuf Karamanli, the Pasha (or Bashaw) of Tripoli, demanded $225,000 (equivalent to $3.2 million in 2015) from the new administration. (In 1800, federal revenues totaled a little over $10 million). Putting his long-held beliefs into practice, Jefferson refused the demand. Consequently, on 10 May 1801, the Pasha declared war on the U.S., not through any formal written documents but in the customary Barbary manner of cutting down the flagstaff in front of the U.S. Consulate.[27] Algiers and Tunis did not follow their ally in Tripoli.

Before learning that Tripoli had declared war on the United States, Jefferson sent a small squadron, consisting of three frigates and one schooner, under the command of Commodore Richard Dale with gifts and letters to attempt to maintain peace with the Barbary powers.[28] However, in the event that war had been declared, Dale was instructed "to protect American ships and citizens against potential aggression," but Jefferson "insisted that he was 'unauthorized by the constitution, without the sanction of Congress, to go beyond the line of defense.'" He told Congress: "I communicate [to you] all material information on this subject, that in the exercise of this important function confided by the constitution to the legislature exclusively their judgment may form itself on a knowledge and consideration of every circumstance of weight."[26] Although Congress never voted on a formal declaration of war, they did authorize the President to instruct the commanders of armed American vessels to seize all vessels and goods of the Pasha of Tripoli "and also to cause to be done all such other acts of precaution or hostility as the state of war will justify." The American squadron joined a Swedish flotilla under Rudolf Cederström in blockading Tripoli, the Swedes having been at war with the Tripolitans since 1800.[29]
Enterprise capturing Tripoli

On 31 May 1801, Commodore Edward Preble traveled to Messina, Sicily, to the court of King Ferdinand IV of the Kingdom of Naples. The kingdom was at war with Napoleon, but Ferdinand supplied the Americans with manpower, craftsmen, supplies, gunboats, mortar boats, and the ports of Messina, Syracuse and Palermo to be used as a naval base to launch operations against Tripoli, a port walled fortress city protected by 150 pieces of heavy artillery manned by 25,000 soldiers, assisted by a fleet of 10 ten-gunned brigs, 2 eight-gun schooners, two large galleys, and 19 gunboats.[30]

The schooner Enterprise (commanded by Lieutenant Andrew Sterret) defeated the 14-gun Tripolitan corsair Tripoli after a one-sided battle on 1 August 1801.

In 1802, in response to Jefferson's request for authority to deal with the pirates, Congress passed "An act for the protection of commerce and seamen of the United States against the Tripolitan cruisers", authorizing the President to "…employ such of the armed vessels of the United States as may be judged requisite… for protecting effectually the commerce and seamen thereof on the Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean and adjoining seas."[31] "The statute authorized American ships to seize vessels belonging to the Bey of Tripoli, with the captured property distributed to those who brought the vessels into port."[26]

The U.S Navy went unchallenged on the sea, but still the question remained undecided. Jefferson pressed the issue the following year, with an increase in military force and deployment of many of the navy's best ships to the region throughout 1802. Argus, Chesapeake, Constellation, Constitution, Enterprise, Intrepid, Philadelphia and Syren all saw service during the war under the overall command of Preble. Throughout 1803, Preble set up and maintained a blockade of the Barbary ports and executed a campaign of raids and attacks against the cities' fleets.
Battles
Main articles: Second Battle of Tripoli Harbor and Battle of Derne
The Philadelphia aground off Tripoli, in October 1803
Stephen Decatur boarding a Tripolitan gunboat during a naval engagement, 3 August 1804
Lieutenant Presley O'Bannon at Derna, April 1805

In October 1803, Tripoli's fleet captured USS Philadelphia intact after the frigate ran aground on a reef while patrolling Tripoli harbor. Efforts by the Americans to float the ship while under fire from shore batteries and Tripolitan Naval units failed. The ship, its captain, William Bainbridge, and all officers and crew were taken ashore and held as hostages. Philadelphia was turned against the Americans and anchored in the harbor as a gun battery.
Burning of USS Philadelphia – "The most bold and daring act of the age."
—Horatio Nelson

On the night of 16 February 1804, Lieutenant Stephen Decatur led a small detachment of U.S. Marines aboard the captured Tripolitan ketch rechristened USS Intrepid, thus deceiving the guards on Philadelphia to float close enough to board her. Decatur's men stormed the ship and overpowered the Tripolitan sailors. With fire support from the American warships, the Marines set fire to Philadelphia, denying her use by the enemy. British admiral, Horatio Nelson, himself known as a man of action and courage, reportedly called this "the most bold and daring act of the age."[32]

Preble attacked Tripoli on 14 July 1804, in a series of inconclusive battles, including a courageous but unsuccessful attack attempting to use Intrepid under Captain Richard Somers as a fire ship, packed with explosives and sent to enter Tripoli harbor, where she would destroy herself and the enemy fleet. However, Intrepid was destroyed, possibly by enemy gunfire, before she achieved her goal, killing Somers and his entire crew.[33]

The turning point in the war was the Battle of Derna (April–May 1805). Ex-consul William Eaton, a former Army captain who used the title of "general", and US Marine Corps 1st Lieutenant Presley O'Bannon led a force of eight U.S. Marines [34] and five hundred mercenaries—Greeks from Crete, Arabs, and Berbers on a march across the desert from Alexandria, Egypt, to capture the Tripolitan city of Derna. This was the first time the United States flag was raised in victory on foreign soil. The action is memorialized in a line of the Marines' Hymn—"the shores of Tripoli".[35] The capturing of the city gave American negotiators leverage in securing the return of hostages and the end of the war.[36]
Peace treaty and legacy

Wearied of the blockade and raids, and now under threat of a continued advance on Tripoli proper and a scheme to restore his deposed older brother Hamet Karamanli as ruler, Yusuf Karamanli signed a treaty ending hostilities on 10 June 1805. Article 2 of the treaty reads:

The Bashaw of Tripoli shall deliver up to the American squadron now off Tripoli, all the Americans in his possession; and all the subjects of the Bashaw of Tripoli now in the power of the United States of America shall be delivered up to him; and as the number of Americans in possession of the Bashaw of Tripoli amounts to three hundred persons, more or less; and the number of Tripolino subjects in the power of the Americans to about, one hundred more or less; The Bashaw of Tripoli shall receive from the United States of America, the sum of sixty thousand dollars, as a payment for the difference between the prisoners herein mentioned.[37]

In agreeing to pay a ransom of $60,000 for the American prisoners, the Jefferson administration drew a distinction between paying tribute and paying ransom. At the time, some argued that buying sailors out of slavery was a fair exchange to end the war. William Eaton, however, remained bitter for the rest of his life about the treaty, feeling that his efforts had been squandered by the state department diplomat Tobias Lear. Eaton and others felt that the capture of Derna should have been used as a bargaining chip to obtain the release of all American prisoners without having to pay ransom. Furthermore, Eaton believed the honor of the United States had been compromised when it abandoned Hamet Karamanli after promising to restore him as leader of Tripoli. Eaton's complaints generally went unheard, especially as attention turned to the strained international relations which would ultimately lead to the withdrawal of the U.S. Navy from the area in 1807 and to the War of 1812.[38]

The First Barbary War was beneficial to the reputation of the United States' military command and war mechanism, which had been up to that time relatively untested. The First Barbary War showed that America could execute a war far from home, and that American forces had the cohesion to fight together as Americans rather than separately as Georgians or New Yorkers. The United States Navy and Marines became a permanent part of the American government and American history, and Decatur returned to the U.S. as its first post-revolutionary war hero.[39]

However, the more immediate problem of Barbary piracy was not fully settled. By 1807, Algiers had gone back to taking American ships and seamen hostage. Distracted by the preludes to the War of 1812, the U.S. was unable to respond to the provocation until 1815, with the Second Barbary War, in which naval victories by Commodores William Bainbridge and Stephen Decatur led to treaties ending all tribute payments by the U.S.[40]

Gunny
06-30-2016, 06:27 PM
Excellent plan.



We've been killing them in other countries because we let them in? :confused:

Nope. Don't be obtuse. They're killing us HERE because we let them in.

fj1200
07-01-2016, 09:47 AM
Nope. Don't be obtuse. They're killing us HERE because we let them in.

Don't start with an incorrect statement. :slap: We are killing them. :)

Gunny
07-01-2016, 09:51 AM
Don't start with an incorrect statement. :slap: We are killing them. :)

One at a time? While they're hitting us 50 at a time. Sounds like we'll win. :rolleyes:

fj1200
07-01-2016, 09:57 AM
One at a time? While they're hitting us 50 at a time. Sounds like we'll win. :rolleyes:

Last I heard we took out 250 in a day and of the 42 who started ISIS 39 are currently dead. :confused:

Gunny
07-01-2016, 09:59 AM
Last I heard we took out 250 in a day and of the 42 who started ISIS 39 are currently dead. :confused:

Yeah because the other 2000 are on their way here in a boat at the invitation of our CinC.

Abbey
07-01-2016, 10:01 AM
It's like trying to get rid of ants. You can kill hundreds, but there are always more...

fj1200
07-01-2016, 10:02 AM
Yeah because the other 2000 are on their way here in a boat at the invitation of our CinC.

Syria is a long way via boat. But at least we agree that we are killing them. :)

fj1200
07-01-2016, 10:02 AM
It's like trying to get rid of ants. You can kill hundreds, but there are always more...

Do you need to kill all of the ants?

Abbey
07-01-2016, 10:05 AM
Do you need to kill all of the ants?

Lol, you may have outdone yourself with this one.

fj1200
07-01-2016, 10:07 AM
Lol, you may have outdone yourself with this one.

Thanks... I think.

Gunny
07-01-2016, 11:07 AM
Syria is a long way via boat. But at least we agree that we are killing them. :)

The ratio is what matters. They're killing more of us than we are them.

fj1200
07-02-2016, 09:10 AM
The ratio is what matters. They're killing more of us than we are them.

Now it's the ratio? I still think you're incorrect.

aboutime
07-02-2016, 08:36 PM
http://nationalinterest.org/feature/whack-mole-obamas-real-isis-strategy-11262WHACK -A-MOLE???

gabosaurus
07-02-2016, 10:13 PM
Do the terrorists (domestic and otherwise) and mass murderers not associated with Islamic groups get a pass?

Elessar
07-02-2016, 10:17 PM
Do you need to kill all of the ants?

Depends on the mindset. Good place to start though by going for the colony.

Elessar
07-02-2016, 10:18 PM
Do the terrorists (domestic and otherwise) and mass murderers not associated with Islamic groups get a pass?

I do not think that was the topic here. Go after the monsters that proclaim harm to this nation,
weed the others out as can be found.

fj1200
07-05-2016, 10:45 AM
Depends on the mindset. Good place to start though by going for the colony.

I would think you'd go for the ants that are doing harm.

Atticus Finch
07-07-2016, 04:34 PM
I would think you'd go for the ants that are doing harm.umm ....ants all think alike,so.....

Elessar
07-07-2016, 07:53 PM
I would think you'd go for the ants that are doing harm.

Destroy the nest and take down the whole mess. Eradicate the main stem and mop up
the rest of them.

fj1200
07-08-2016, 09:23 AM
umm ....ants all think alike,so.....


Destroy the nest and take down the whole mess. Eradicate the main stem and mop up
the rest of them.


Assuming you're talking about actual terrorists.

namvet
07-08-2016, 06:31 PM
http://i64.tinypic.com/25iw7bq.jpg

Gunny
07-08-2016, 07:18 PM
Now it's the ratio? I still think you're incorrect.

Really? Last actual war we actually won was WWII. It wasn't because we had better stuff. It's because we had more stuff in manpower and materiel.

In case you haven't noticed, this a centuries old war of attrition. Now that we won't fight back, they're winning. They've got more of Europe and the US than at any point in time.

Kill or be killed. It ain't algebra.

Gunny
07-08-2016, 07:22 PM
Do the terrorists (domestic and otherwise) and mass murderers not associated with Islamic groups get a pass?

Not with me they don't.

Gunny
07-08-2016, 07:23 PM
umm ....ants all think alike,so.....

They all look alike too.

fj1200
07-09-2016, 04:14 PM
Really? Last actual war we actually won was WWII. It wasn't because we had better stuff. It's because we had more stuff in manpower and materiel.

In case you haven't noticed, this a centuries old war of attrition. Now that we won't fight back, they're winning. They've got more of Europe and the US than at any point in time.

Kill or be killed. It ain't algebra.

I merely point you back to the killing we've done. Besides we've won wars since then, it's just the aftermath we haven't done so well which brings up the question of why fight it in the first place.

Gunny
07-09-2016, 04:30 PM
I merely point you back to the killing we've done. Besides we've won wars since then, it's just the aftermath we haven't done so well which brings up the question of why fight it in the first place.

Circular argument. What we "have done" is the guilt trip the media and politicians live for. They've been creaming their drawers this past week. Takes all the attention off them raping us blind as a people and a society.

The whole point to the fight is THAT. Politicans keep it going to keep attention off them. The media keeps it going to create a story. The idiot militant keeps it going to make money because he can't get a real job.

My idea of fighting is you meet in the ring or on a mat or with some freaking tiddly winks and you shake hand when it's over. Don't let blindness to the obvious skew your mind.

fj1200
07-09-2016, 04:33 PM
Circular argument. What we "have done" is the guilt trip the media and politicians live for. They've been creaming their drawers this past week. Takes all the attention off them raping us blind as a people and a society.

The whole point to the fight is THAT. Politicans keep it going to keep attention off them. The media keeps it going to create a story. The idiot militant keeps it going to make money because he can't get a real job.

My idea of fighting is you meet in the ring or on a mat or with some freaking tiddly winks and you shake hand when it's over. Don't let blindness to the obvious skew your mind.

Not when you start with a false premise. :poke: I'm not quite sure your argument right now though. I think we should either do what we're doing better (if even possible) or we shouldn't do it at all.

Gunny
07-09-2016, 04:39 PM
Not when you start with a false premise. :poke: I'm not quite sure your argument right now though. I think we should either do what we're doing better (if even possible) or we shouldn't do it at all.

There is no false premise. We have an enmy we are refusing to address. We'll keep losing until we do.

The false premise is you pretending to be blind to actuality. That elephant in the room isn't going to change into a mouse.

fj1200
07-09-2016, 04:41 PM
There is no false premise. We have an enmy we are refusing to address. We'll keep losing until we do.

The false premise is you pretending to be blind to actuality. That elephant in the room isn't going to change into a mouse.

You said we need to kill them back; We are. I'm not blind to reality but we are short on better answers.

Gunny
07-09-2016, 04:50 PM
You said we need to kill them back; We are. I'm not blind to reality but we are short on better answers.

We're not doing sh*t to them. Try looking at some history. The only thing that has kept them in check is brute force throughout the centuries. It's no different now than in the 6th century with them. It's all they understand.

YOU don't understand. They don't think like us. Democracy is a stupid word to them. They have no understanding of it, nor even a guideline.

While our end result may be the same -- I'm for kick their asses and get out aand not letting them in -- but our reasons are different. You and so many like you are trying to explain an Arab mind with Western conclusions.

I had to constantly derail my Marines from that mindset. They ARE a dangerous enemy. Treat them for what they are. Not what your dreams want them to be.

fj1200
07-09-2016, 05:07 PM
We're not doing sh*t to them. Try looking at some history. The only thing that has kept them in check is brute force throughout the centuries. It's no different now than in the 6th century with them. It's all they understand.

YOU don't understand. They don't think like us. Democracy is a stupid word to them. They have no understanding of it, nor even a guideline.

While our end result may be the same -- I'm for kick their asses and get out aand not letting them in -- but our reasons are different. You and so many like you are trying to explain an Arab mind with Western conclusions.

I had to constantly derail my Marines from that mindset. They ARE a dangerous enemy. Treat them for what they are. Not what your dreams want them to be.

Thank you for telling me what I know, think, and understand. :rolleyes:

Gunny
07-09-2016, 05:37 PM
Thank you for telling me what I know, think, and understand. :rolleyes:

I DO think and understand. And I know when it's time to quite talking and man the line. You're easy. You wouldn't stand a chance against me. You're too busy caught up in your beliefs and ignoring physical law.

The guy that knows how to fight wins. The guy that thinks his mouth and idealism is a weapon gets killed.

fj1200
07-11-2016, 11:15 AM
I DO think and understand. And I know when it's time to quite talking and man the line. You're easy. You wouldn't stand a chance against me. You're too busy caught up in your beliefs and ignoring physical law.

The guy that knows how to fight wins. The guy that thinks his mouth and idealism is a weapon gets killed.

I can see that your mind is made up. No point in saying more. :shrug:

Gunny
07-11-2016, 11:03 PM
I can see that your mind is made up. No point in saying more. :shrug:

Let's get real, bubba. My mind is open. Just not so open as I can't make a point and/or hold beliefs. Seems to me YOU are the one with the indecisive mind. I've never had that luxury. I look at both sides of an argument on my own time. I never got to sit behind my desk with a slide rule and calculate crap the day after I had to make the decision.

Some of you people just blow me away. You don't get to second guess in my game. You act or someone dies.

So yeah, once I DO make a command decision, I'm going with it. I'll ask for forgiveness after every swinging d*ck is back aboard ship.

fj1200
07-12-2016, 09:50 AM
Let's get real, bubba. My mind is open. Just not so open as I can't make a point and/or hold beliefs. Seems to me YOU are the one with the indecisive mind. I've never had that luxury. I look at both sides of an argument on my own time. I never got to sit behind my desk with a slide rule and calculate crap the day after I had to make the decision.

Some of you people just blow me away. You don't get to second guess in my game. You act or someone dies.

So yeah, once I DO make a command decision, I'm going with it. I'll ask for forgiveness after every swinging d*ck is back aboard ship.

You're on a website discussing the issues of the day dude.

Gunny
07-15-2016, 04:45 PM
You're on a website discussing the issues of the day dude.

No, I'm on a website having a discussion with someone just running in circles about me.