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Gunny
07-17-2016, 05:04 PM
First off, the passenger signed his name for the ticket as Dan Cooper. Where the D.B.comes from beats me.

Second, the guy's dead. They found the money or what they presume to be the money years ago.

The History Channel is beating this one to death. He'd be older than any of us if he was still alive. His bones are laying out there somewhere.

crin63
07-17-2016, 05:15 PM
The FBI closed the case on it. I watched that whole stupid 4 hours worth of show for them to say nothing to see here, move along.

Gunny
07-17-2016, 05:31 PM
The FBI closed the case on it. I watched that whole stupid 4 hours worth of show for them to say nothing to see here, move along.

Dude, I got Commiecast. I get desperate. And I'm usually up until 5AM. I'm constantly searching for something worth watching. Bad enough they sync their commercials so the art of surfing is out. In the middle of the night they run the same ones over and over and run more of them than daytime.

Only reason I brought up the topic is because every time last night ALL FREAKIN NIGHT I switched to History, it was D.B. Cooper. Talk about necro. I remember when they actually had history on the history channel.

Elessar
07-17-2016, 07:13 PM
The terrain in the Pacific NW is unforgiving. There are forests and marshlands all over
that if you go in and get lost (especially prior to GPS, Sat Phones, and PLB's), and are
unprepared or in-experienced - your ass is toast.

A family died just to the east of here a few years back when they took a supposed
short-cut from I-5 to Agness Oregon across an unimproved road in the winter.
Even though that Bear Mountain road is shown on maps to be avoided in the winter,
this idiot from San Francisco chose to take it. Whole family found dead.

These mountains are nothing to mess with unless you know them well. Just last
week, Crater Lake National Park had 3 inches of snow...in July!

D.B. Cooper is DEAD!

Gunny
07-17-2016, 07:22 PM
The terrain in the Pacific NW is unforgiving. There are forests and marshlands all over
that if you go in and get lost (especially prior to GPS, Sat Phones, and PLB's), and are
unprepared or in-experienced - your ass is toast.

A family died just to the east of here a few years back when they took a supposed
short-cut from I-5 to Agness Oregon across an unimproved road in the winter.
Even though that Bear Mountain road is shown on maps to be avoided in the winter,
this idiot from San Francisco chose to take it. Whole family found dead.

D.B. Cooper is DEAD!

If you aren't experienced in survival training, you're toast. Not so oddly enough, I wouldn't know what to do in a forest. I'm desert trained, swamp trained and water survival trained. The first thing I would NOT do is parachute into those trees. I have been camping in Big Sur and Sequoia Nat'l Forest. No thanks.

You break an ankle jumping out of a plane or get your chute hung on a tree, you're done. I'd rob a bank before trying that crap.

Elessar
07-17-2016, 07:29 PM
If you aren't experienced in survival training, you're toast. Not so oddly enough, I wouldn't know what to do in a forest. I'm desert trained, swamp trained and water survival trained. The first thing I would NOT do is parachute into those trees. I have been camping in Big Sur and Sequoia Nat'l Forest. No thanks.

You break an ankle jumping out of a plane or get your chute hung on a tree, you're done. I'd rob a bank before trying that crap.

I am forest, river, mountain, and beach experienced...plus the water survival. I might have trouble in a swamp or desert
unless I remember what I read in a Field Manual - Survival, Evasion, and Escape - issued by the DOD in the 60's!
BSA learning over the years is helpful as well.

Did you ever see a series of books called "Woodsmoke"? They are simple, enlightening, and interesting.

Gunny
07-17-2016, 07:54 PM
I am forest, river, mountain, and beach experienced...plus the water survival. I might have trouble in a swamp or desert
unless I remember what I read in a Field Manual - Survival, Evasion, and Escape - issued by the DOD in the 60's!
BSA learning over the years is helpful as well.

Did you ever see a series of books called "Woodsmoke"? They are simple, enlightening, and interesting.

Nah, but I'm sure I could add lib. I CAN read a compass. The desert is not as hard as you think.

1. know where you are. If you knw where you are you and where to go, you either head for out or water.

2. Travel at night and find shelter from the sun during the day.

3. No matter how hot you think it is, keep your cammies on. They fill with sweat and sweat cools you off and the cammies protect you from the sun.

4. Follow beside animal trails. They will lead you to water.

5. NO FIRES. You can see a fire 20 miles away in the desert. And you don't know who is seeing it. Besides, if you got THAT much water to waste to get a shave and cook your MRE's you ain't in trouble.

Russ
07-17-2016, 09:05 PM
I remember reading some of the stories about D B Cooper. It's a fairly fascinating story. I didn't see the shows that were on recently, but I heard they were closing the case.

What I remember is this:
- He signed his name "Dan Cooper" when getting his ticket, but some newspaper mistakenly printed his name as "D.B. Cooper", and the DB name stuck more than the actual name.
- They thought he was around 40 at the time of the hijacking back in the 60's, so he would be a little over 90 now.
- They found a small portion of the money in a sandbar around 1980, but it wasn't weathered enough to have been there the whole time.
- The sandbar where the money was found was not within the flight path of the plane or within the area that they thought he might have landed if he survived the parachute drop.
- All the DNA tests they've done to eliminate suspects were compared to a necktie that was left on the plane. They think the necktie was his but they actually are not sure.

I personally believe he survived the parachute drop for one reason - no one ever found a body. With all the searching they did, I think they easily would have found his body if he died in the fall. I guess its possible someone else found his body first, kept the money, and got rid of the body, but unlikely.

Elessar
07-17-2016, 09:11 PM
Nah, but I'm sure I could add lib. I CAN read a compass. The desert is not as hard as you think.

1. know where you are. If you knw where you are you and where to go, you either head for out or water.

2. Travel at night and find shelter from the sun during the day.

3. No matter how hot you think it is, keep your cammies on. They fill with sweat and sweat cools you off and the cammies protect you from the sun.

4. Follow beside animal trails. They will lead you to water.

5. NO FIRES. You can see a fire 20 miles away in the desert. And you don't know who is seeing it. Besides, if you got THAT much water to waste to get a shave and cook your MRE's you ain't in trouble.

What you say is exactly the stuff in that manual, especially finding water - look under rock out-croppings in washes and dry stream beds.

Sun rises in the East, settles in the West. Even on a cloudy day, you should be able to discern the sun from the warmth on your body
and glare in the clouds.

Gunny
07-17-2016, 09:32 PM
What you say is exactly the stuff in that manual, especially finding water - look under rock out-croppings in washes and dry stream beds.

Sun rises in the East, settles in the West. Even on a cloudy day, you should be able to discern the sun from the warmth on your body
and glare in the clouds.

Well I did take the course, but I learned most of that OJT. Spent a lot of time in the desert. Hell I livr in the desert now. And I know EXACTLY where the water is.