PDA

View Full Version : Today in History: The Confederate Constitution is approved



Tyr-Ziu Saxnot
03-12-2017, 01:04 AM
https://www.yahoo.com/news/looking-back-confederate-constitution-103819503.html


Today in History: The Confederate Constitution is approved
[National Constitution Center]
NCC Staff
National Constitution CenterMarch 11, 2017

On March 11, 1861, delegates from the newly formed Confederate States of America agreed on their own constitution. Here is a look at this little-known third constitution that controlled the lives of about 9 million people for a short period of time.
Confederate_congress-458x300
Confederate_congress-458x300

Much of the Confederate Constitution mirrored the Constitution of the United States as it existed at the time, with bigger differences in the matters of slavery and states’ rights.

In 1860, there were more than 9 million people, including 3 million slaves, living in the states and territories that would leave the Union, compared with 22 million people outside those areas.

The document was drawn up and approved just a week after Abraham Lincoln became president of the United States. There were seven southern states that had seceded at the time, and a total of 11 would secede and join the Confederacy officially. (Missouri and Kentucky were also considered members, but didn’t officially secede from the Union.)

At first glance, much of the Confederate document was taken directly from the U.S. Constitution.

Link: Read Confederate Constitution

But there were several passages related to slavery that were much different. The Confederate version used the word “slaves,” unlike the U.S. Constitution. One article banned any Confederate state from making slavery illegal. Another ensured that slave owners could travel between Confederate states with their slaves.

The Confederate constitution also accounted for slaves as three-fifths of a state’s population (like the U.S. Constitution did at the time), and it required that any new territory acquired by the nation allow slavery.

In other ways, the Confederate constitution was closer to the Articles of Confederation, which preceded the U.S. Constitution–it was focused on states’ rights.

The Confederate preamble begins, “We, the people of the Confederate States, each State acting in its sovereign and independent character…”

The U.S. Constitution starts with the more familiar, “We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union…”

Confederate states had the ability to impeach federal officials, collect more taxes, and make treaties with each other under certain circumstances. They could also create lines of credit.

When it came to elected officials, the Confederate constitution limited the president to one, six-year term in office in a person’s lifetime. The vice president didn’t have term limits.

The president also had use of the line-item veto in budget matters.

Senators and representatives served under circumstances that were very similar to rules in the U.S. Constitution.

It also had a Bill of Rights, lumped together with rules about Congress. (Most of the rights in the U.S. Constitution’s original Bill of Rights were incorporated.)

One additional right stated that the government couldn’t impair “the right of property in negro slaves” to owners.

The Confederate Congress operated in a similar fashion to the United States. But the Confederate Congress couldn’t pass legislation about amendments. That role was reserved for the states.

Cabinet members could also answer questions on the floor of Congress.

The Supreme Court system was also very similar to the one used by the United States. But it was never formed during the Civil War because of the government’s instability.

The Confederate Congress met for six sessions during the war. Political parties didn’t form in the Confederacy, but there were political factions in the electorate.

Jefferson Davis, a former U.S. senator, served as the Confederate president.

Tyr-Ziu Saxnot
03-12-2017, 12:41 PM
The lack of the usual left-sided opposition in reply to this thread, to me is a clear sign of just how badly Trump has beaten down the usual ""suspects"" , with his supposedly infantile and ignorant rantings and inexplicable success in victory and now his brilliant execution of his campaign promises!
They are so beaten as to have dug so deep under the nearest rock, as not to see daylight, nor even be able answer to this thread , and its
noting the Civil War, its dastardly Southern Confederacy and its Constitution!

Who would have thunk it, a moron like, TRUMP DEMOLISHING THESE SUPPOSED HIGHLY ENLIGHTENED LIB GENIUSES. :laugh::laugh::laugh:
Fear grips them like an iron glove , while they hide under rocks, hand delivering only self-love.. ;)

Glory be.... :beer: :beer: -Tyr

revelarts
03-12-2017, 04:11 PM
The lack of the usual left-sided opposition in reply to this thread, to me is a clear sign of just how badly Trump has beaten down the usual ""suspects"" , with his supposedly infantile and ignorant rantings and inexplicable success in victory and now his brilliant execution of his campaign promises!
They are so beaten as to have dug so deep under the nearest rock, as not to see daylight, nor even be able answer to this thread , and its
noting the Civil War, its dastardly Southern Confederacy and its Constitution!

Who would have thunk it, a moron like, TRUMP DEMOLISHING THESE SUPPOSED HIGHLY ENLIGHTENED LIB GENIUSES. :laugh::laugh::laugh:
Fear grips them like an iron glove , while they hide under rocks, hand delivering only self-love.. ;)

Glory be.... :beer: :beer: -Tyr

Tyr, your 1st post seemed to pretty historically accurate.
As it points out the main difference in the confederate constitution for the U.S. constitution was it's emphasis on protecting and perpetuating "negro" slavery.

I'm not sure why you wanted to to post it.
and I'll make no assumptions.

I personally am very happy that the Confederacy got it's arse kicked and is DEAD. It was a short lived bass-ackward nation whose leaders main concern was to extend it's wealth via african slavery into the 20th century and beyond.
I'm glad it's dead, like Nazi Germany and U.S.S.R., good riddance to bad rubbish.

of course we all want to preserve the great southern qualities of good food, hospitality, cordiality, love of God, honesty, respect for elders and the like.
But i don't see those things in the Confederate Constitution. do you? I don't see them specifically birthed in the few years the confederate states were actually viable. The south had those before and after the confederacy's thankfully SHORT life. the South had those good qualities While they were and are PART OF the U.S.A. proper.

So the confederate constitution doesn't, in my thinking at least, represent anything but an ugly and thankfully dead document. the historical notation of it in this tread is like noting the approval of the building of concentration camps of Germany. It is good to remember past political horrors from time to time.


SaveSave

gabosaurus
03-12-2017, 10:34 PM
The Civil War is part of American history. I see no reason to pretend that it didn't exist. I also see no reason to glorify the key figures of the Confederacy. For the same reason why there are no statues of Nazi leaders in Germany.
History celebrates the winners, not the losers.

Tyr-Ziu Saxnot
03-12-2017, 11:37 PM
Tyr, your 1st post seemed to pretty historically accurate.
As it points out the main difference in the confederate constitution for the U.S. constitution was it's emphasis on protecting and perpetuating "negro" slavery.

I'm not sure why you wanted to to post it.
and I'll make no assumptions.

I personally am very happy that the Confederacy got it's arse kicked and is DEAD. It was a short lived bass-ackward nation whose leaders main concern was to extend it's wealth via african slavery into the 20th century and beyond.
I'm glad it's dead, like Nazi Germany and U.S.S.R., good riddance to bad rubbish.

of course we all want to preserve the great southern qualities of good food, hospitality, cordiality, love of God, honesty, respect for elders and the like.
But i don't see those things in the Confederate Constitution. do you? I don't see them specifically birthed in the few years the confederate states were actually viable. The south had those before and after the confederacy's thankfully SHORT life. the South had those good qualities While they were and are PART OF the U.S.A. proper.

So the confederate constitution doesn't, in my thinking at least, represent anything but an ugly and thankfully dead document. the historical notation of it in this tread is like noting the approval of the building of concentration camps of Germany. It is good to remember past political horrors from time to time.


SaveSave

I made no comment on the article.
I presented it because it is a historic fact and interesting to me and perhaps to others here as well.
I do not and never have agreed with slavery, yet the South was far more than just slavery.
And it was savaged after the war ended, savaged by Yankee carpet-beggars.. A fact..
HOWEVER INTERESTING IS THE FACT THE CONFEDERACY'S CONSTITUTION GAVE ADDITIONAL RIGHTS/POWERS TO THE STATES.
Whereas, our modern federal government keeps stripping power away from the states.-Tyr

Tyr-Ziu Saxnot
03-12-2017, 11:42 PM
The Civil War is part of American history. I see no reason to pretend that it didn't exist. I also see no reason to glorify the key figures of the Confederacy. For the same reason why there are no statues of Nazi leaders in Germany.
History celebrates the winners, not the losers.

Nazi comparison is invalid and wrong.
As to speaking about such leaders be they confederate politicians or military officers, that is a historic discussion, not to be confused with
debating the right or wrong of pro or anti-slavery issues.-Tyr

Gunny
03-13-2017, 10:48 AM
Nazi comparison is invalid and wrong.
As to speaking about such leaders be they confederate politicians or military officers, that is a historic discussion, not to be confused with
debating the right or wrong of pro or anti-slavery issues.-Tyr

I agree with you in principle; however, the left's myth has re-written history. You cannot divorce one from the other. One of our earlier examples of the MSM. Horace Greely and Beecher-Stowe used slavery as their red herring. The war was fought over money. Northern industry made their money from domestic textile goods and the South made theirs from trade with the Europe. The Northerners wanted a high tariff and the South did not. Abolitionists were actually a small minority. They just tossed their hats in the ring on the side that eventually won. This was about control of the government, the people and money.

Regardless what some wish to believe, the social and economic divide still exists. They just changed the names. Nowadays we're uneducated rednecks. And these crybabies want to wipe our heritage away, and blacks think they are entitled when they have more opportunity than we do. We have to earn our sh*t.

Gunny
03-13-2017, 10:52 AM
The US Constitution is actually a rip off of the magna carta from England. The CSA constitution did the same. Changed a few words around. The American Revolution was fought because some rich boys didn't want to pay their taxes so they committed treason.

There's a theme here.

cnm
07-29-2017, 08:30 AM
I do not and never have agreed with slavery, yet the South was far more than just slavery.


But it's government was based on the idea of the inferiority of the black man as expressed by its Vice President. That means slavery is the distinguishing feature of the South, other factors are of less importance.

cnm
07-29-2017, 08:33 AM
I agree with you in principle; however, the left's myth has re-written history. You cannot divorce one from the other. One of our earlier examples of the MSM. Horace Greely and Beecher-Stowe used slavery as their red herring. The war was fought over money.

Funny how the Vice President of the Confederacy disagrees with you. Still, revisionists will revise.


Our new government is founded upon exactly [this] idea; its foundations are laid, its corner-stone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery subordination to the superior race, is his natural and normal condition. This, our new government, is the first, in the history of the world, based upon this great physical, philosophical, and moral truth.

The new Constitution has put at rest forever all the agitating questions relating to our peculiar institutions (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peculiar_institution)—African slavery as it exists among us—the proper status of the negro in our form of civilization. This was the immediate cause of the late rupture and present revolution.
https://en.wikipedia.org

(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornerstone_Speech)