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Bilgerat
05-25-2017, 11:50 AM
On May 25, 1953 at 8:30 am, the atomic cannon was tested at the Nevada Test Site (specifically Frenchman Flat) as part of the Upshot-Knothole series of nuclear tests.

The test code-named "Grable" was attended by Admiral Arthur W. Radford and the Sec of Defense Charles Erwin Wilson; it resulted in the successful detonation of a 15 kt shell at a range of seven miles.

This was the first and only nuclear shell to be fired from a cannon.




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8IvER-GGEY

CSM
05-25-2017, 06:55 PM
On May 25, 1953 at 8:30 am, the atomic cannon was tested at the Nevada Test Site (specifically Frenchman Flat) as part of the Upshot-Knothole series of nuclear tests.

The test code-named "Grable" was attended by Admiral Arthur W. Radford and the Sec of Defense Charles Erwin Wilson; it resulted in the successful detonation of a 15 kt shell at a range of seven miles.

This was the first and only nuclear shell to be fired from a cannon.




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8IvER-GGEY

This test is why we don't have tactical nuclear hand grenades! 7 miles from origin is "Danger Close" if you are firing nukes...lol

Gunny
05-25-2017, 07:28 PM
This test is why we don't have tactical nuclear hand grenades! 7 miles from origin is "Danger Close" if you are firing nukes...lolI was thinking the same thing, Sergeant Major. I wouldn't want to be within the radius of that cloud coming done, much only 7 miles away.

CSM
05-25-2017, 07:37 PM
I was thinking the same thing, Sergeant Major. I wouldn't want to be within the radius of that cloud coming done, much only 7 miles away.

I can understand it given they were in the early days of nuclear weapon development and all that. Wasn't a lot known about nuclear radiation, etc.

"Made in USA, tested in Japan"....

KarlMarx
05-25-2017, 09:27 PM
Just finished reading a book on the making of the atom bomb. One statistic stood out... all the bombs dropped during WWII was about 2,000,000 tons of TNT....


that is the equivalent of one thermonuclear warhead in our arsenal.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVAEroMKyGc

Bilgerat
05-26-2017, 09:37 AM
The movie Star Wars debuts.


:laugh2: :laugh: :laugh2: :laugh: :laugh2: Feeling older yet :laugh2: :laugh: :laugh2: :laugh: :laugh2:

Bilgerat
05-28-2017, 06:42 PM
Audie Murphy died in a plane crash in Virginia in 1971 shortly before his 46th birthday, and was interred with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery.

Audie Leon Murphy was one of the most decorated American combat soldiers of World War II, receiving every military combat award for valor available from the U.S. Army, as we​ll as French and Belgian awards for heroism.

He received the Medal of Honor for valor demonstrated at the age of 19 for singlehandedly holding off an entire company of German soldiers for an hour at the Colmar Pocket in France in January 1945, then leading a successful counterattack while wounded and out of ammunition.