Page 69 of 69 FirstFirst ... 1959676869
Results 1,021 to 1,024 of 1024
  1. #1021
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    USA, Southern
    Posts
    24,520
    Thanks (Given)
    27687
    Thanks (Received)
    15845
    Likes (Given)
    1861
    Likes (Received)
    1541
    Mentioned
    51 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    21475175

    Default

    From Wisdom Born, Decades Fighting Fate's Cursed Hand

    In youth, a young lad roars for much needed applause
    in old age, wisely remains silent with just cause,
    seeing the end near, some shed bitterest of tears
    thinking such splashing supplications, angels hear;
    whereas this old, callous world neither sees nor cares
    what sorrow one displays or how much heart one shares
    for savage the measure world uses to reward
    dying lover or a talented, humble bard.

    On pages offering up their softest virgin whites
    are invisible castles beyond mortal sights,
    each one begging for its wailing walls to withstand
    massive cannon shots or a victor's crushing hand!

    Poets, be they young or old, should a full pen hold true
    to life, as spilling of ink- its treasures accrues!

    Robert J. Lindley, 1-01-2020
    Sonnet, ( Why All We Think We See, May Be An Illusion )
    ( So Spoke The Raven, After Master Poe Demanded Silence )
    Syllables Per Line:0 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 0 12 12 12 12 0 12 12
    Total # Syllables::168
    Total # Words:::::120

    Note:
    Muse demanded I write this second poem on this first day
    and it be dark. Raven agreed and Master Poe abstained.
    Paper sang a blackened tune and pen danced a raging jig
    as evil clouds rumbled while gathering in the far west
    echoes drifted through broken window, and Hades jingled
    a billion unbreakable chains. A older and wiser poet yielded
    to avoid the usual headaches and aching pains!


    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2020
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

  2. #1022
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    USA, Southern
    Posts
    24,520
    Thanks (Given)
    27687
    Thanks (Received)
    15845
    Likes (Given)
    1861
    Likes (Received)
    1541
    Mentioned
    51 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    21475175

    Default

    A Rainbow Sings

    Prismatic rainbow graces sky many ways
    with brilliant hues of multicolored rays
    picturesque goniochromism sings to decorate
    a ketch with Tyrian purple sails out late

    Sepia hue tinges this kaleidoscopic scene
    monolexemic shades threaten to richly preen
    majestic phenomena seen in sky embraces
    mists, vanishing clouds and aurorae traces

    A Rayleigh Scattering sets rainbow apart
    miracle that sends opalescence to impart
    this sky mingling multitude of colors now
    as red, orange, purple and yellow take bow

    Interwoven within this prismatic awe inspiring view
    The hopes and dreams of gentle poets like me and you!

    Robert J. Lindley, 08-10-2014
    Rhyme


    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2014
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

  3. #1023
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    USA, Southern
    Posts
    24,520
    Thanks (Given)
    27687
    Thanks (Received)
    15845
    Likes (Given)
    1861
    Likes (Received)
    1541
    Mentioned
    51 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    21475175

    Default

    (1A.)
    Doomed To Feel That Bite And Hear Serpent's Wicked Hiss

    Beyond mingling of Light, Matter, Human thought
    reams of coils within darkest abyss are there caught
    denied rays emitted by our reddish flame sun
    wherein single feather may weigh a billion tons
    lay boiling cauldrons of spittle and greedy lust
    built upon sad foundations of mankind's dying dust!

    Immune from wailing tears that victims so oft shed
    and many choked valleys of warriors slow bled
    storing loud echoes that darkness holds very dear
    are battalions that spreadeth greatest mortal fear
    joined in deep agonies with Life and Fated Time
    destruction across every place and clime!

    Alas! As terror brings woes to humanity
    for its wicked deeds, and arrogant vanity
    as an unmerciful world, tentacles wide spread
    from birth of human flesh until stone-cold and dead
    and beneath blue sky and mother earth left to rot
    forever gone, dear life, love, and all man has got!

    Within coils are lost souls in spinning black abyss,
    Doomed to feel that bite and hear serpent's wicked hiss!

    R.J. Lindley, July 26th-1990
    Dark Rhyme, ( Are Mortals Doomed To This World Stay Blinded And Lost )
    ( Tribute to Edgar Allen Poe )
    References,
    Edgar Allen Poe, Two of his most recognizable works
    (1.) The Fall of The House of Usher and -,
    (2.) Raven - (NOT MENTIONED DIRECTLY, BUT IN SPIRIT GHOSTED)...



    (2.B)

    Always In Search Of Echoes, Rarely Ever Heard

    In silence, I seek deep solitude of my pain
    as reclusive ghost drowning in slow flushing drain
    spiraling in abyss that destroys precious life
    bleeding torrents cut by humanity's sharp knife
    suspended above darkness, nothingness below
    macabre imagery of late night horror show.

    Waking as black-forest burns its long wailing trees
    strange image of a sad ghost cut off at its knees
    knowing this charade is just a poor poet's dream
    fantasy born to hear some more low silent screams
    pleading to stop that loud watery, rushing sound
    just another victim, not completely hell bound.

    In silence, heartbroken among life's dying herd.
    Always in search of echoes, rarely ever heard.

    R.J. Lindley, June 22nd, 1990
    Dark sonnet, ( Well Beyond Midnight's Long Silent Parades )

    Syllables Per Line:0 12 12 12 12 12 12 0 12 12 12 12 12 12 0 12 12
    Total # Syllables::168
    Total # Words::::::110

    Note:
    *This welcome from beyond midnight's hazy halo
    *Journey into the Dark, few rarely ever go
    *An imaginative rendering by a muse
    *One given in a way, I could never refuse.

    ADDITIONAL NOTE-
    Each poem has over the years been edited several times,
    including today, making four edits first poem and three
    edits on the second poem.



    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2020
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

  4. #1024
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    USA, Southern
    Posts
    24,520
    Thanks (Given)
    27687
    Thanks (Received)
    15845
    Likes (Given)
    1861
    Likes (Received)
    1541
    Mentioned
    51 Post(s)
    Rep Power
    21475175

    Default

    When Swift, Bird of Hermes, Its Last Flight Takes--


    (1.)Hermes
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jump to navigationJump to search
    For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation).
    Hermes
    Boundaries, roads and travelers, commerce, thieves, athletes, shepherds. Psychopomp and divine messenger.
    Hermes Ingenui Pio-Clementino Inv544.jpg
    Hermes Ingenui (Vatican Museums), Roman copy of the 2nd century BC after a Greek original of the 5th century BC. Hermes wears kerykeion, kithara, petasus (round hat), traveler's cloak and winged temples.
    Abode Mount Olympus
    Symbol Talaria, caduceus, tortoise, lyre, rooster, Petasos (Winged helmet)
    Personal information
    Parents Zeus and Maia
    Siblings Aeacus, Angelos, Aphrodite, Apollo, Ares, Artemis, Athena, Dionysus, Eileithyia, Enyo, Eris, Ersa, Hebe, Helen of Troy, Hephaestus, Heracles, Minos, Pandia, Persephone, Perseus, Rhadamanthus, the Graces, the Horae, the Litae, the Muses, the Moirai
    Consort Merope, Aphrodite, Dryope, Peitho
    Children Pan, Hermaphroditus, Abderus, Autolycus, Eudorus, Angelia, Myrtilus
    Equivalents
    Roman equivalent Mercury
    Etruscan equivalent Turms
    Egyptian equivalent Thoth, Anubis
    This article contains special characters. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols.
    Part of a series on
    Ancient Greek religion
    Laurel wreath
    Features[show]
    Godheads[show]
    Ethics[show]
    Practices[show]
    Sacred places[show]
    Texts[show]
    History[show]
    P religion world.svg Religion portal
    Parthenon from west.jpg Ancient Greece portal
    v t e
    Hermes (/'h??rmi?z/; Greek: ?ρμ?ς) is a deity in Ancient Greek religion and mythology. Hermes is considered the god of boundaries, as well as the transgression of boundaries.

    Hermes is believed to move freely between the worlds of the mortal and divine, and act as the psychopomp, or conductor of souls, into the afterlife.[1] He was also viewed as the protector and patron of roads and travelers,[2] as well as merchants, messengers, sailors, athletes, herdsmen, and thieves.[3]

    In myth, Hermes was the emissary and messenger of the gods,[4] often considered the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia. Hermes was also described as "the divine trickster"[5]. His attributes and symbols include the herma, the rooster, the tortoise, satchel or pouch, winged sandals, and winged cap. His main symbol is the Greek kerykeion or Latin caduceus, which appears in a form of two snakes wrapped around a winged staff with carvings of the other gods.[6] Other symbols of Hermes included the palm tree, turtle, rooster, goat, the number four, several kinds of fish, and incense.[7]

    In Latin, Hermes was known as Mercury,[8] and his attributes had previously influenced the earlier Etruscan god Turms, a name borrowed from the Greek "herma".[9]

    Contents
    1 Name and origin
    2 Iconography
    3 Functions
    3.1 As a chthonic and fertility god
    3.2 As a god of boundaries
    3.3 As a messenger god
    3.4 As a shepherd god
    4 Historical and literary sources
    4.1 In the Mycenaean period
    4.2 In the Archaic period
    4.3 In the Classical period
    4.4 In the Hellenistic period
    4.5 In the Roman period
    4.6 In the Middle Ages
    4.7 Temples
    4.8 Festivals
    5 Epithets
    5.1 Atlantiades
    5.2 Kriophoros
    5.3 Argeiphontes
    5.4 Messenger and guide
    5.5 Trade
    5.6 Dolios
    5.7 Thief
    5.8 Additional
    6 Mythology
    6.1 Early Greek sources
    6.2 Hellenistic Greek sources
    6.3 Lovers and children
    6.4 Genealogy
    7 In Jungian psychology
    8 Hermes in popular culture
    9 See also
    10 Notes
    11 References
    12 Further reading
    13 External links
    Name and origin
    The earliest form of the name Hermes is the Mycenaean Greek *hermahas,[10] written ?????? e-ma-a2 (e-ma-ha) in the Linear B syllabic script.[11] Most scholars derive "Hermes" from Greek ?ρμα herma,[12] "prop,[13] heap of stones, boundary marker", from which the word hermai ("boundary markers dedicated to Hermes as a god of travelers") also derives.[14]

    The etymology of ?ρμα itself is unknown, but is probably not a Proto-Indo-European word.[10] R. S. P. Beekes rejects the connection with herma and suggests a Pre-Greek origin.[10] However, the stone etymology is also linked to Indo-European *ser- (“to bind, put together”). Scholarly speculation that "Hermes" derives from a more primitive form meaning "one cairn" is disputed.[15] Other scholars have suggested that Hermes may be a cognate of the Vedic Sarama.[16][17]

    It is likely that Hermes is a pre-Hellenic god, though the exact origins of his worship, and its original nature, remain unclear. Frothingham thought the god to have existed as a Mesopotamian snake-god, similar or identical to Ningishzida, a god who served as mediator between humans and the divine, especially Ishtar, and who was depicted in art as a Caduceus.[18][19] Angelo (1997) thinks Hermes to be based on the Thoth archetype.[20] The absorbing ("combining") of the attributes of Hermes to Thoth developed after the time of Homer amongst Greeks and Romans; Herodotus was the first to identify the Greek god with the Egyptian (Hermopolis), Plutarch and Diodorus also, although Plato thought the gods to be dis-similar (Friedlander 1992).[21][22]

    His cult was established in Greece in remote regions, likely making him originally a god of nature, farmers, and shepherds. It is also possible that since the beginning he has been a deity with shamanic attributes linked to divination, reconciliation, magic, sacrifices, and initiation and contact with other planes of existence, a role of mediator between the worlds of the visible and invisible.[23] According to a theory that has received considerable scholarly acceptance, Hermes originated as a form of the god Pan, who has been identified as a reflex of the Proto-Indo-European pastoral god *Péh2uson,[24][25] in his aspect as the god of boundary markers. Later, the epithet supplanted the original name itself and Hermes took over the roles as god of messengers, travelers, and boundaries, which had originally belonged to Pan, while Pan himself continued to be venerated by his original name in his more rustic aspect as the god of the wild in the relatively isolated mountainous region of Arcadia. In later myths, after the cult of Pan was reintroduced to Attica, Pan was said to be Hermes's son.[25][26]

    Iconography

    Archaic bearded Hermes from a herm, early 5th century BC.

    Statue of Hermes wearing the petasos, a voyager's cloak, the caduceus and a purse. Roman copy after a Greek original (Vatican Museums).
    The image of Hermes evolved and varied along with Greek art and culture. In Archaic Greece he was usually depicted as a mature man, bearded, and dressed as a traveler, herald, or pastor. This image remained common on the Hermai, which served as boundary markers, roadside markers, and grave markers, as well as votive offerings.

    In Classical and Hellenistic Greece, Hermes was usually depicted as a young, athletic man lacking a beard. When represented as Logios (Greek: Λ?γιος, speaker), his attitude is consistent with the attribute. Phidias left a statue of a famous Hermes Logios and Praxiteles another, also well known, showing him with the baby Dionysus in his arms.

    At all times, however, through the Hellenistic periods, Roman, and throughout Western history into the present day, several of his characteristic objects are present as identification, but not always all together.[27][28] Among these objects is a wide-brimmed hat, the petasos, widely used by rural people of antiquity to protect themselves from the sun, and that in later times was adorned with a pair of small wings; sometimes this hat is not present, and may have been replaced with wings rising from the hair.

    Another object is the caduceus, a staff with two intertwined snakes, sometimes crowned with a pair of wings and a sphere.[29] The caduceus, historically, appeared with Hermes, and is documented among the Babylonians from about 3500 BC. Two snakes coiled around a staff was also a symbol of the god Ningishzida, who, like Hermes, served as a mediator between humans and the divine (specifically, the goddess Ishtar or the supreme Ningirsu). In Greece, other gods have been depicted holding a caduceus, but it was mainly associated with Hermes. It was said to have the power to make people fall asleep or wake up, and also made peace between litigants, and is a visible sign of his authority, being used as a sceptre.[27] The caduceus is not to be confused with the Rod of Asclepius, the patron of medicine and son of Apollo, which bears only one snake. The rod of Asclepius was adopted by most Western doctors as a badge of their profession, but in several medical organizations of the United States, the caduceus took its place since the 18th century, although this use is declining. After the Renaissance the caduceus also appeared in the heraldic crests of several, and currently is a symbol of commerce.[27]

    Hermes' sandals, called pédila by the Greeks and talaria by the Romans, were made of palm and myrtle branches but were described as beautiful, golden and immortal, made a sublime art, able to take the roads with the speed of wind. Originally, they had no wings, but late in the artistic representations, they are depicted. In certain images, the wings spring directly from the ankles. Hermes has also been depicted with a purse or a bag in his hands, wearing a robe or cloak, which had the power to confer invisibility. His weapon was a sword of gold, which killed Argos; lent to Perseus to kill Medusa.[27]

    (1.)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermes



    (2.)https://www.theoi.com/Olympios/Hermes.html
    ******************************************

    When Swift, "Bird of Hermes", Its Last Flight Takes

    When swift "Bird of Hermes" its fast flight takes
    path through nether worlds, its tall broken stones
    phantom from Olympic heights swiftly breaks,
    to survive ancient gods's dying groans.

    Into earthen world, flashing flaming wings
    from behind echoes of thunder and light
    as unto death its silent cries may bring
    truth in Time's abyss, of past days and nights.

    Fleet and airy such journey to and fro
    as divine messenger delivers words
    from Olympus covered in purest snow
    down to mankind in its sad teeming herds.

    And of such, does man ever truly see
    divine beauty of Nature's true worth
    far more than bounty of all seven seas
    tis' abundance of life strewn across earth.

    When swift "Bird of Hermes" its fast flight takes
    path through nether worlds, its tall broken stones
    phantom from Olympic heights swiftly breaks,
    to survive ancient gods's dying groans.

    Of the "Bird of Hermes", some disbelieve
    yet some poets may feel its midnight flight
    especially so midnight of New Years Eve
    within hopes and dreams given bird's first sight.

    Did not such dead gods mirror soul of man
    complete with its greed and many dark lusts
    and creation of this world, its long span
    that ends with our bodies turning to dust?

    Shall we not listen to message as sent
    yet still struggle in dark, epic strains
    as we ignore what such tales truly meant
    truth is hidden within man's failing brain.

    Does modern science our souls ever save
    or technology everything explain
    do we know what lies beyond mortal grave
    or if part of us on this earth remains?

    When swift "Bird of Hermes" its fast flight takes
    path through nether worlds, its tall broken stones
    phantom from Olympic heights swiftly breaks,
    to survive ancient gods's dying groans.

    Robert J. Lindley, March 7 2019/ January 21- 2020
    Hermes, Greek Mythology,
    (A Vision Through Midnight Realms Once Seen)


    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2020
    Last edited by Tyr-Ziu Saxnot; 01-21-2020 at 11:28 AM.
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •