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  1. #1006
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    Note: Stats on poems:

    Honor Sent To Great Bard, Alexander Pushkin Second Tribute Series, Fifth Poet

    Stats of first poem - a tribute sonnet

    Robert J. Lindley, 11/23/2019
    Sonnet, 10,10,10,10 (Closing verse 12, 12 )
    Second Poets Tribute Series, Alexander Pushkin
    Syllables Per Line: 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10 0 12 12
    Total # Syllables:: 144
    Total # Words:::::: 110

    Stats of second poem- a tribute poem
    Robert J. Lindley, 11-22-2019
    Rhyme, ( When Darkness Lost Its Wicked Grip )
    Alexander Pushkin Tribute
    Syllables Per Line:
    10 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10
    Total # Syllables: 210
    Total # Words:::: 170
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    (Honor Sent To Great Bard, Alexander Pushkin
    Second Tribute Series, Fifth Poet)

    (1.)
    Poetry Gave Its Deep Rich Brilliance Unto Thee

    Bard, what bright Light graced thy soft serenades
    In late midnight hours, moonlight streaming down
    Alas! With Time's fleeing flight, thy fame fades
    Yet thy verse treasures gave thee world renown.

    Bard, thy prowling ship upon open seas
    Delivered thy Art, to this sad world please
    Fate, its dark hand did thy youthful life take
    For thy wife's honor, thee would not forsake!

    Bard, from thy glory this poet now feels
    Pains of sorrows at thy early demise
    From thy fruited verse, this world so oft peels
    In its beauty, words so precious and wise!

    Poetry gave its deep rich brilliance unto thee.
    As thy muse sent thee magnificent melodies.

    Robert J. Lindley, 11/23/2019
    Sonnet, 10,10,10,10 (Closing verse 12, 12 )
    Second Poets Tribute Series, Alexander Pushkin

    Syllables Per Line: 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10 0 12 12
    Total # Syllables:: 144
    Total # Words:::::: 110

    (2.)
    New Dawn, New Life, To Heaven Rose My Cry

    Pray I, to One that made ground and blue sky
    Giving us earth's beauty for Heaven's sake
    With bounty that mankind can not deny,
    Thus fallen on grassy greens so, Pray I.

    By heavens, Life caresses soul in me
    Yet in blackest blackness of darkest night
    In my wayward youth, this I sought to flee
    And into black blackness of darkest sea.

    Pray I, for salvation before I die
    And true to His grace, faith was reborn true
    With promise of dear life a bounding tie
    Thus dark went away and sweet thanks, Pray I.

    New dawn, new Life, to Heaven rose my cry
    And soon I heard an angel chorus sing
    Into its sounding midst, I did thus fly
    With sweet teardrops that fell from misty eyes.

    Pray I, others this blessing from blue sky
    And Love and Peace such gift, God truly brings
    Dastardly road took, I shall not deny
    As bowing my head and with joy, Pray I.

    Robert J. Lindley, 11-22-2019
    Rhyme, ( When Darkness Lost Its Wicked Grip )
    Alexander Pushkin Tribute

    Syllables Per Line:
    10 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10
    Total # Syllables: 210
    Total # Words:::: 170

    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2019
    From my blog...
    Information on , Fifth poet- Alexander Pushkin , honored in my Second Poets Tribute Series
    Blog Posted:11/23/2019 9:37:00 AM


    Information on , Fifth poet- Alexander Pushkin ,
    honored in my Second Poets Tribute Series


    (1.) https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Pushkin

    Alexander Pushkin
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    He was a Russian poet, novelist, dramatist and writer of short stories.
    Many think he was the greatest Russian poet.

    Aleksandr Pushkin by Vasily Tropinin
    Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin was born 26 May 1799 (6 June New Style) 1799, Moscow, and died 29 January 1837 (10 February, New Style), St Petersburg. He was a Russian poet, novelist, dramatist and writer of short stories.

    Many think he was the greatest Russian poet. He started the great tradition of Russian literature. Pushkin wrote in a way that no other Russian had done: he used the Russian language as it was spoken instead of writing in a style based on old church books. His influence on other Russian writers was enormous and several Russian composers set his stories and poems to music. His poetry is very hard to translate well into other languages because the words are full of special meanings in Russian culture. His novels, especially Eugene Onegin, are widely read.

    Pushkin was the great-grandson of an African slave of the Tzar Peter the Great. He was killed in a duel in 1837 at the age of 37.

    Early years
    Pushkin's father came from an old aristocratic family. On his mother's side Pushkin had African ancestors. His great-grandfather Abram Gannibal was an Abyssinian who was living in a palace of the Turkish sultan in Istanbul. The Russian ambassador bought him as a present for Peter the Great, the tsar of Russia. Gannibal became a favourite of Peter the Great and he was sent to Paris to study. He became very rich. Pushkin was proud of his great-grandfather and wrote about him in a novel called The Negro of Peter the Great.

    In 19th century Russia all aristocratic families learned to speak French, so Pushkin and his brother and sister spoke and wrote in French more than in Russian. The children were cared for by a nurse, Arina Rodionovna Yakovleva. It was the nurse who taught them to love the Russian language. She told the children Russian folktales. Pushkin also spoke Russian to the peasants and he read many books in his father's library.

    When he was 12 he went to a new school called the Imperial Lyceum at Tsarskoye Selo. Years later this school was renamed Pushkin after their famous pupil. He soon started writing romantic poems in Russian using Russian tales of heroes and adventures. Ruslan and Ludmila was a poem that was later to be made into an opera by Mikhael Glinka.

    Adulthood
    In 1817, Pushkin got a job in the foreign office at St. Petersburg. He soon became interested in politics and supported the Decembrist revolt of 1825 when a group of noblemen and army officers tried to put another tsar in power and make him less powerful. Pushkin wrote some political poems. The result was that he was told he had to leave St. Petersburg. He had to spend six years in exile in the south of the country: in the Caucasus and the Crimea. He wrote about his experiences in the south in several romantic narrative poems (long poems which tell a story). He started work on a novel in verse called Yevgeny Onegin (or Eugene Onegin). He did not finish it until 1833. This was to be his most famous work. It was used by many musicians including Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky who made it into an opera. The poem shows typical Russian people in the society of his day.

    Pushkin was angry that he was still in exile and he wrote many letters to his friends. Many of these letters were later published. He spent a lot of time drinking, gaming and fighting with swords. He fell in love with the daughter of a Count for whom he was working. The Count managed to get Pushkin exiled to his mother's estate near Pskov at the other end of Russia. Pushkin spent two years here. He was lonely, but he studied Russian history and talked to the peasants. The poems he wrote were full of ideas from Russian culture. He wrote one of his major works: Boris Godunov, a drama about a story from Russian history. The composer Modest Mussorgsky later made an opera from it. Boris Godunov was a cruel tsar in the 17th century. Pushkin's play shows that the ordinary people had a lot of power. This made it difficult for Pushkin to get it published.

    Return from exile
    After the revolt in 1825 the new tsar Nicholas I realized that Pushkin was by now very famous. He also realized that he had not taken part in the revolt, so he allowed him to return. The tsar said that he himself would censor Pushkin's works before they were allowed to be published. He said that he was going to be a good tsar and help the poor people (the serfs) to become free. Pushkin was in a difficult position because he could not write anything that the tsar would not like.

    He had to be very careful not to say bad things about the rulers of the country. The police watched him very carefully. Yet at this time Pushkin wrote a large number of great works, almost each one of them being the first of their kind in Russian literature. One example is the short story The Queen of Spades, which Tchaikovsky made into an opera and which was to be a great influence on the novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky.

    Last years
    In his last years, Pushkin was again in government service in St. Petersburg. He married in 1831 and had to spend a lot of time in society at court. He wrote more and more prose. He wrote a history of Peter the Great and a historical novel The Captain's Daughter. He kept asking the tsar to let him resign from his job and go to the country to spend his time writing. The tsar would not allow that. In 1837, Pushkin was killed in a duel. He had been forced to fight the duel in order to defend his wife's honour.

    Pushkin’s achievements
    The Russian language today would be very different if it had not been for Pushkin. Using the language as it was spoken by the people he made it into a language which was simple but which could also express deep feelings. His works were a great influence on later writers like Ivan Turgenev, Ivan Goncharov and Leo Tolstoy. Yevgeny Onegin was the first Russian novel which told a story about the society of the time. His works have been translated into all the major languages

    (2.)
    https://www.britannica.com/biography...yevich-Pushkin

    (3.)
    https://www.notablebiographies.com/P...Aleksandr.html
    Last edited by Tyr-Ziu Saxnot; 11-25-2019 at 08:59 AM.
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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  3. #1007
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    To Taste, Trenchant Flavor Of Her Soft Kiss

    To taste, trenchant flavor of her soft kiss,
    Under night skies' munificent moon rays,
    Arcadian smile, touch I now so miss,
    Her guileless wit, stirring soul to this day.

    To touch yet again, lush lips so divine,
    Feel her deep warmth that this soul still invades,
    To remember waking, to dawns so fine,
    Absent embarrassing human charades.

    To hold her heart, as if sweet Life it gave,
    Its beauty, her amatory appeals,
    Gifts of Love's Truth, did this wayward soul save,
    From sclerotic heart, that too oft Life kills.

    To think ruminative thoughts and agree.
    Such an angel was far too good for me.

    Robert J. Lindley, 12-08-2019
    Romanticism, ( Sonnet) ( A Blessing, Lost In Folly Of My Wayward Youth )


    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2019

    ************************************
    Note:

    Composed this morn from the seed of a poem fragment that was
    written in 1977. I woke having dreamed of this lady. Searched,
    found the old poem fragment and then went to composing.
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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  5. #1008
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    God Bless You Robert...providing a water-hole for my soul is a good thing...


    **Thanks for what you do....



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  7. #1009
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    Quote Originally Posted by LongTermGuy View Post


    God Bless You Robert...providing a water-hole for my soul is a good thing...


    **Thanks for what you do....
    Thank you for the recognition my friend. Poetry is a passion of mine and I have been at it for many decades.
    Writing became one of many addictions I had in my youth. Thankfully it was one that was good, had merit
    and that I have been blessed to have kept alive.

    Words, words, sometimes they fly out like graceful songbirds
    With a swishing sway, truth in magnificent flight
    Or trampling dust-clouds rising from predatory herds
    They skulk from shadows lurking on Raven-clad nights.-- RJL
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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  9. #1010
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    I Know Some Of Life's Sorrows, Fate Decrees Everlasting

    I saw seven dying newborn white horses
    I stumbled upon seventeen darken courses
    I ran through twenty-seven ancient burnt temples
    I found love may hard, even when life is simple.

    I sat at thirty-seven broken wooden tables
    I listen intently to forty-seven mystical fables
    I kissed sweetly of fifty-seven kindhearted virgins
    I sat in ocean fires with flaming tides surging.

    I spoke sixty-seven times of my cravings
    I cried out seventy-seven of my maddest ravings
    I sang eighty-seven songs of death and devastation
    I recall the best and worse of me without hesitations.

    I wonder if hundred-seven years would be worth living
    I think I need hundred twenty-seven years for forgiving
    I beg for hundred thirty-seven days of deepest fasting
    I know some of life's sorrows, Fate decrees everlasting.

    R.J. Lindley, Sept 20th. 1976, December 11th, 2019
    Rhyme, ( The Roads That Fate And Destiny Set Upon Us )
    - Where the mystical shadow dances and blows.-


    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2019
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

  10. #1011
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    Robert, have you read the poetry of Mary Sarton? Particularly “Encore: A Journal of the Eightieth Year”? If not, check it out on Amazon; I think you would really enjoy it.
    After the game, the king and the pawn go into the same box - Author unknown

    “Unfortunately, the truth is now whatever the media say it is”
    -Abbey

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  12. #1012
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    O' Destiny Why Did Thy Fatal Blow Come?

    Within midnight's pallid moonlight
    Glows that sad heart boldly demand
    Memories of that fateful night
    And loss of a true angel's hands
    O' destiny why did thy fatal blow come?

    Within her love, lay paradise
    Sensual appetites and more
    Kisses that did more than suffice
    To leave me begging for much more
    O' destiny why did thy fatal blow come?

    Within this world, misery ebbs
    Huge waves crash and massive tides turn
    Like flies in hungry spider's web
    Fate cries, victims get what they earn
    O' destiny why did thy fatal blow come?

    Within dreams reality denies
    Dance nights that lovers truly miss
    Beddings, and yellow moonlit skies
    Before hearing snake's deadly hiss
    O' destiny why did thy fatal blow come?

    Within life that sorrows now infect
    Love's past memories sustain
    Briefest moments to this reflect
    How I shall not kiss you again
    O' destiny why did thy fatal blow come?

    R.J. Lindley, April 12th 1977, December 11th, 2019
    Romanticism/Rhyme, ( When Sorrows Flood Like A Swollen River )

    Note: Another poem fragment completed today.
    Perhaps this Christmas season I may be able to do many.
    A blessing if that is gifted me.....


    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2019

    **************************************

    Abbey thank you for the information given in your post my friend.. I will check out that poet tomorrow.
    It does seem to me that I've came across her name before..
    During my past research on my famous female poets dedication series....
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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