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  1. #1081
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    Robert J. Lindley, 9/15, 9/16, 9/17
    Sonnet trilogy,
    ( When Blessed Gifts Are Suddenly Given To One Pleading )


    Note -- This new creation, was composed in three days of
    each day my reading of Thomas Gray's magnificent poem,
    Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, that was first
    published in 1751....
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elegy_...try_Churchyard


    Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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    First page of Dodsley's illustrated edition of Gray's Elegy with illustration by Richard Bentley
    Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard is a poem by Thomas Gray, completed in 1750 and first published in 1751.[1] The poem's origins are unknown, but it was partly inspired by Gray's thoughts following the death of the poet Richard West in 1742. Originally titled Stanzas Wrote in a Country Church-Yard, the poem was completed when Gray was living near St Giles' parish church at Stoke Poges. It was sent to his friend Horace Walpole, who popularised the poem among London literary circles. Gray was eventually forced to publish the work on 15 February 1751 in order to preempt a magazine publisher from printing an unlicensed copy of the poem.

    The poem is an elegy in name but not in form; it employs a style similar to that of contemporary odes, but it embodies a meditation on death, and remembrance after death. The poem argues that the remembrance can be good and bad, and the narrator finds comfort in pondering the lives of the obscure rustics buried in the churchyard. The two versions of the poem, Stanzas and Elegy, approach death differently; the first contains a stoic response to death, but the final version contains an epitaph which serves to repress the narrator's fear of dying. With its discussion of, and focus on, the obscure and the known, the poem has possible political ramifications, but it does not make any definite claims on politics to be more universal in its approach to life and death.

    Claimed as "probably still today the best-known and best-loved poem in English",[2] the Elegy quickly became popular. It was printed many times and in a variety of formats, translated into many languages, and praised by critics even after Gray's other poetry had fallen out of favour. Later critics tended to comment on its language and universal aspects, but some felt the ending was unconvincing—failing to resolve the questions the poem raised—or that the poem did not do enough to present a political statement that would serve to help the obscure rustic poor who form its central image.
    ************************************************** *************
    Inspiration, Revelation, Adaptation, Within Poetic Verse

    Sonnet I

    I saw morn's soft hands stretching to touch bright moonlight
    Tis but a fleeting blink betwixt man's death and birth
    Dark unknowing is why we so oft fear the night
    In that abject blindness, fail to see life's true worth
    Alas! Such are sorrows of mankind's constant plight
    That feeds malignant swellings of darkness on earth;
    Those of ancient times, of distant long dead yesterdays
    Will one day from that deepest of slumbers arise
    Long hidden from flown days and nights, world's weeping grays
    Be reborn with no thoughts of world's previous lies.
    As earth spins, sounding its constant evolving beats
    We blind to light's truth, continue our foolish acts
    Racing onward counting our coins and useless feats
    Life came from light's truth, not so-called man-made facts.

    Sonnet II

    I that thought to profit, see beyond mortal veil
    Having never measured truest rectitude of life
    In my epic quest, the highest of mountains scale
    In youth, blind to sad flowing storms of mortal strife
    Alas! We that in our darkness refuse to see
    Oft face raging storms that seem to forever swirl
    Not realizing, Love's blessings are given free
    To counter lightning bolts world's malevolence hurls.
    I that foolishly thought to defeat that we die
    Later learned truth that our vanity denies
    We are lost because we believe world's greatest lie
    That we were once roaming beasts beneath earthen skies
    By our own greatness became gods of divine might
    Free to do as we please, revel in our delights.

    Sonnet III

    In June, when wondering winds our hearts so lighten
    I have found eager bubbling brooks streaming along
    Summer's morn setting up to day gaily brighten
    Nature gifting beauty, songbirds gifting sweet song
    Across flowering meadows, busy bees flying
    Life many treasures so beautifully sharing
    Time to live, not sadly ponder mortal dying
    For truest of joy depends on our loving caring
    There rests much more happiness in sincere kindness
    And sweeter breath within Love's soft touch inspiring
    Eyes to truly see, welcome defeat of blindness
    Rather than worldly conflicts and daily sparring
    To satisfy our fleshly dreams and dark desires
    Lets embrace light's divine truth that never expires.

    Robert J. Lindley, 9/15, 9/16, 9/17
    Sonnet trilogy,
    ( When Blessed Gifts Are Suddenly Given To One Pleading )


    Note -- This new creation, was composed in three days of
    each day my reading of Thomas Gray's magnificent poem,
    Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, that was first
    published in 1751....

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elegy_...try_Churchyard


    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2020
    I hope that you may enjoy this new creation- as I put all of my poetic heart and soul into it.
    I so needed something as a distraction from my current woes and worries. -Tyr
    Last edited by Tyr-Ziu Saxnot; 09-19-2020 at 06:12 AM.
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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  3. #1082
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    Note- Poem from my new blog....

    Robert J. Lindley, 9-22-2020
    Rhyme,
    ( A Look At A Sad Reality, Those Worthy But Not Rewarded )

    Syllables per line:
    0 10 10 10 10
    0 10 10
    0 10 10 10 10
    0 10 10
    0 10 10 10 10
    0 10 10
    0 10 10 10 10
    0 10 10
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    Total number of syllables:280
    Total number of words:214
    Oh, That Earth Wouldst So Truly Honor Thee
    Dedicated To-
    "The Great Unknown, Unsung Poets of the
    - Past, Present And Future"

    ***********************************************

    Oh, That Earth Wouldst So Truly Honor Thee


    Oh, that earth wouldst so truly honor thee
    You write poetic verse with such deep glee
    As in glory-fruits reaped from your ink tree
    Birth gentle winds blowing through land and sea.

    Splash thee more, dear hope from your native tongue.
    And gift world beautiful verse to be sung.

    Inked pools born from candor and purest heart
    Offerings of whispers that truth imparts
    Defeating the dark which sets us apart
    To gift more, fill up love's bountiful cart.

    Splash thee more, dear hope from your native tongue.
    And gift world beautiful verse to be sung.

    Within thy soul and even thy sadness
    Counter with blessed hope this world's madness
    Shine with rhyming words, bringing on gladness
    Yet ignore world's inglorious fadness.

    Splash thee more, dear hope from your native tongue.
    And gift world beautiful verse to be sung.

    And through thy darkest sorrows gift anew
    Heroic words that deepest dark breaks through
    Gifts empathy, care many are thus due
    For truth, darkness oft turns sky weeping blue.

    Splash thee more, dear hope from your native tongue.
    And gift world beautiful verse to be sung.

    Oh, that earth wouldst so truly honor thee
    You write poetic verse with such deep glee
    As in glory-fruit reaped from your ink tree
    Birth gentle winds blowing through land and sea.

    Robert J. Lindley, 9-22-2020
    Rhyme,
    ( A Look At A Sad Reality, Those Worthy But Not Rewarded )


    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2020
    Last edited by Tyr-Ziu Saxnot; 09-22-2020 at 05:48 PM.
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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  5. #1083
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    Beautiful Scenes And Treasures Divinely Born
    Poet's Notes(Hide)(Show)
    Become a Premium Member and post notes and photos about your poem like Robert Lindley.

    Robert J. Lindley, 10-02-2020
    Cinquain, Sonnet, Cinquain
    (CSC)...

    Syllables per line:
    0 2 4 6 8 2 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 0 2 4 6 8 2
    Total number of syllables:184
    Total number of words:128

    Note:
    After having regained a bit of my former self.
    I wrote three dark poems- while in my melancholy state.
    I will maybe post those at a later date.
    Decided to post this positive, uplifting and image-
    filled poem as my comeback presentation. And decided
    to work with a different form. A combo idea I have had
    for a long time but never got around to experimenting
    with it. So please understand this is my very first
    effort with it -my "virgin foray" into it so to speak.
    I hope you may enjoy it and get something positive
    and uplifting from its message, imagery and hope born
    within. God bless...

    Beautiful Scenes And Treasures Divinely Born.
    part one of three


    Downward ...
    Soft specks falling,
    Like echoes frozen white
    Whispers sent from December skies
    Downward.

    (The Ancient Tree )..
    Thereinto awe its magnificent trunk
    sinking its teeth into soft virgin ground
    earth paying no heed as each deeper sunk
    as to its firm teether, the tree was bound.

    Above grown reaching for bright sky and sun
    umbrella limbs hanging massive and long
    biggest was giant arms weighing a ton
    handy stages for songbirds and sweeter song.

    Morning sun's rays glistening eager leaves
    as the dancing breeze moved them too and fro
    beauty that stirs mankind to God believe
    divine hands painted Nature's sweeping show.

    Ancient tree in hidden forest gleaming
    With beauty sublime and clear brooks streaming.

    Winter ...
    Ground creamy white,
    Trees, moaning pallid skies
    Children thanking Christmas break and
    Winter.

    Robert J. Lindley, 10-02-2020
    Cinquain, Sonnet, Cinquain
    (CSC)..
    .


    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2020
    Last edited by Tyr-Ziu Saxnot; 10-06-2020 at 02:41 PM.
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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  7. #1084
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    "Morning sun's rays glistening eager leaves

    as the dancing breeze moved them too and fro


    beauty that stirs mankind to God believe


    ....divine hands painted Nature's sweeping show.


    Ancient tree in hidden forest gleaming"

    Nice Tyr....Very nice.



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  9. #1085
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    Beautiful Scenes, Night Their True Love Was Born, two of three
    Poet's Notes(Hide)(Show)
    Become a Premium Member and post notes and photos about your poem like Robert Lindley.

    ( Beautiful Scenes, Night Their True Love Was Born )

    Robert J. Lindley, 10-02-2020
    Cinquain, Sonnet, Cinquain
    (CSC)... two of three

    Syllables per line:
    2 4 6 8 2
    0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10 10 10 0 10 10
    0 2 4 6 8 2
    Total number of syllables:184
    Total number of words:138
    ****************************************

    Beautiful Scenes, Night Their True Love Was Born,
    two of three


    Sublime ...
    Love's sweetest bliss,
    Whispers tender and sweet
    Moanings, pleasures, ecstasy's touch
    Sublime.

    Moon had its most bountiful gold-glows cast
    filtering through tall oak trees onto earth
    they in love that truly forever lasts
    cared not for fame nor for world's greedy worth.

    Romance demands they stay together here
    allowing life and joy to penetrate
    with the power of joined strength face their fears
    and embrace the beauty of Loving fate.

    He saw into her gleaming bright blue eyes
    moonbeams of ardor's deep radiant glow
    she saw in his face, love that never dies
    as each yielded to love's tidal tow.

    As night's moon and love's hands joined, so did they.
    Into loving arms until break of day.

    Passion ...
    Love and kisses
    Feelings heart wants and needs
    Vows, he for her and she for he
    Passion.

    Robert J. Lindley, 10-06-2020
    Cinquain, Sonnet, Cinquain
    (CSC)... two of three


    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2020
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

  10. #1086
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    Beautiful Gems, Golden Gifts True Love Brought,
    third poem of three



    Poet's Notes--

    .html

    IN SEASON
    Cupid's story about true love
    MARK MOLLDREM In Season Feb 13, 2017

    Cupid has been domesticated. Originally, a strapping youth of marriageable age (with wings, bow and arrow), this classical god (Cupid, son of Venus, in Latin; Eros, son of Aphrodite, in Greek) has degenerated into a cutsie child (sometimes diapered, yet with wings, bow and arrow) to sentimentalize greetings of affection on Valentine’s Day cards. A person who falls in love says, “I have been struck with Cupid’s arrow.”

    The ancient story of Cupid reveals a deep truth about our humanity. The story itself swirls around a jealous mother. The goddess Venus despises what the human woman Psyche has done to her divine reputation. Because everyone is fawning over the ravishing beauty of Psyche, worship in the temples of Venus has declined and the grounds have deteriorated. In jealous anger, Venus recruits the skills of her son, Cupid, to punish Psyche.

    “Use your power and make the hussy fall madly in love with the vilest and most despicable creature there is in the whole world” (as reported by Apuleius, second-century CE writer of Roman tales). However, the god of love himself fell hopelessly in love with Psyche as soon as he saw her. The story takes many twists and turns due to intimidated men who could only admire Psyche from a distance (none having the courage to ask for her hand in marriage), an oracle’s instruction on how to get a husband, and a rescue by the gentle Zephyr wind.

    In what seems like a strange relationship, Cupid draws Psyche into his mansion, but will only be with her at night when she cannot look upon him. She rests comfortably in this until her sisters visit her and with jealousy in their hearts question what kind of a man this must be. Psyche determines to look upon him at night with a lamp in hand, even though Cupid warned her that this would bring only great disappointment. When Cupid woke upon her presence with the lamp, he immediately fled, saying, “Love cannot live where there is no trust.”



    However, this is Cupid, god of love, and the story will have its happy ending eventually. After mean mother Venus inflicts several trials upon Psyche while she searches relentlessly for Cupid, they are finally reunited. Cupid himself had been longing for Psyche and took steps (or in his case, flight) to see that nothing would get in their way again. He flew to Mount Olympus and prevailed upon Jupiter to make Psyche immortal so they could be united forever. She was given the ambrosia (elixir of the gods) to drink and everyone was happy ever after, including Venus.

    A dramatic turning point in this story occurred when Psyche broke her trust in Cupid. She had experienced great comfort and peace by his side at night even though she could not see him. When this was not enough, she lost him. Trust is a vital aspect of love because love is a mystery and we can never know everything about the beloved. Love accepts that enough can be known to trust the rest into the arms of the beloved. To demand more is to betray that which drew one into the loving relationship in the first place. Also, as more may indeed be surprisingly revealed—like your husband has wings on his shoulders which could be seen with the lit lamp—love will be able to see through that to the core person with whom one is in love. In this sense, love is not blind, but demonstrates is power in the full light of disclosure—warts (or wings) and all!

    But, even more philosophically profound as to the nature of humanity—for the story of the gods is really the story of humanity: the soul (psyche) is not complete without love. As Edith Hamilton, renowned interpreter of classical civilization, concludes about this story, “Love (Cupid) and the soul (‘psyche’ is the Greek word for the soul) belong together in an inseparable union.”



    The capacity to love and be loved is a great, if not the greatest, gift of our humanity. It defines us as truly human beyond the capacity of a rock or a mollusk. How are you valuing and exercising your capacity to love and be loved at this time in your life?

    French novelist, Albert Camus, comments with a poignant play on words, “Fiction is the lie through which we tell the truth.” Ancient myths about the gods and Mount Olympus are imaginative fabrications that express truths we live out on earth. Your life is not a fiction, nor is it a lie. What truth about love are you living out for real? This is more than a Valentine’s Day question.

    (Mark J. Molldrem is a writer, community volunteer, and daily host of Joy in the Morning on WBEV. He lives in Beaver Dam with his wife, Shirley. WordPowerSolutions@gmail.com)
    (*********************************)

    Beautiful Gems, Golden Gifts True Love Brought,
    third poem of three.


    True love ...
    Depths that heart swells,
    longings that birth hot flames
    night-gems, true eternal treasures
    True love.

    With desires born, heart wedding sweet love dreams
    songs, a most eager spirit dares sing,
    heart swelled so near to bursting at its seams
    gems of life's most precious of renderings.

    The beauty of true heart, its greatest song
    scenes of gasping nights and her hottest kiss,
    love with joyous fervor that brought along
    sensual heat and most heavenly bliss.

    She that beauty's sharpest eyes sets apart
    a rare gift that mortal longing desires,
    for nothing greater rewards seeking heart
    and nothing on earth lights hotter fires.

    Goddess, both rejoicing in love-born fires.
    United by love that never expires.

    Soft touch ...
    kiss that invites
    concupiscence, and more
    nights, hot waves of raging desires
    Soft touch.

    Robert J. Lindley, 10-10-2020
    Cinquain, Sonnet, Cinquain
    (CSC)... three of three
    Final poem in series



    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2020
    Last edited by Tyr-Ziu Saxnot; 10-10-2020 at 09:40 PM.
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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  12. #1087
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    Halloween Tale, Poetic Dream Of Raven, Poe And I
    (Not a contest entry)


    When into an unearthed slumber I fell
    An accursed storm came with its black tail
    Within isles of swirling doom and gloom
    I woke, a prisoner in a dark tomb
    Chained to the wall in a small blood-soaked cell
    Lashed repeatedly, pains a bloody hell.

    No dawn ever came, gasping echoes wailed
    Hands of black had this tortured soul impaled
    Every fortnight a red moon cast its rays
    Shadows brought forth from saddest pallid greys
    In agony, these I begged to speak
    Lifting their veils, a few began to peek.

    Ungodly were hideous faces seen
    Gaping fanged mouths, wicked eyes glowing green
    Skeletal white hands with long dagger claws
    Razor edges teeth shown in gaping jaws
    Such a grave sight made my heart skip a beat
    As evil green eyes did this poor soul greet.

    That terrifying sight brought thoughts of Poe
    His inspiring verses truths I did know
    Conjured up my thoughts of Raven's dark words
    My lifelong fear of that devilish bird
    Soon as thought a magnificent voice spoke
    I am Poe, dearest friend, so glad I woke.

    At this news, my crying soul felt relief
    Poe was my hero, always my belief
    Somehow his words giving this soul power
    To this heart sent bright bountiful showers
    In greatest need, his speaking gave some peace
    I knew only he could gain my release.

    Alas! All was happening far too quick
    I thought of Raven, this must be a trick
    Could it be master Poe was not so near
    Had I fantasized that he could appear
    Knowing Raven my inner thoughts had read
    Into defeated brain his poison fed.

    Raven then demanded master Poe must leave
    Return to his realm to Annabel grieve
    Poe spoke, "innocent soul you must set free"
    This battle is between myself and thee
    Raven shot, "your pen gives me no commands."
    I yield not to such great foolish demands.

    Poe replied I need no poetic quill
    To vanquish you and evil curse you spill
    I need only this soulful heart in me
    Faith and grace rests within my peaceful sea
    Your villainy is cracking your weak shield
    Nothing more powerful can your hate field.

    At this refute, I saw Raven cower
    From strong vibes of Poe's increasing powers
    His legs crumpled while his beating wings flamed
    He knew Poe won, he had been far out-gamed
    Light into that abyss began to flood
    To wash away ghastly gore and blood.

    Suddenly my chains crumbled into dust
    To my freedom fast flee, I felt I must
    To my friend Poe these grateful words I spoke
    Thanks, for freedom from Raven's slaving yoke
    For his inspiring poems, I have read
    That sent me on poetic journeys tread.

    Before my exit, Poe I bid Adieu
    Praying him, divine mercy he is due
    At those parting words, Raven flew away
    Shouting out, "we will meet some future day.
    On that day my powers shall be immense
    From my weapons, there will be no defense."

    With joyous glee, I stepped into the light
    Then recalled that Halloween is tonight
    Next thought was Raven may again appear
    Would I be brave or hideaway in fear
    Poe whispered softly, my friend I am here
    Darkness shall not prevail, that truth is clear.

    Robert J. Lindley, 10-12-2020
    Dark Rhyme, ( A Halloween Tale, for readers of any age )
    A poem first composed in early 1990's *edited heavily
    in 2014, and again in 2020...



    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2020
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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    `........A broken heart is the most terrifying prison`





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    Quote Originally Posted by LongTermGuy View Post
    `........A broken heart is the most terrifying prison`


    A wonderful link. My son Justin loved it too.. Thanks...---Tyr
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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    The Poet, The Pen, The Solemn Prayer, In Tribute To Edgar Allan Poe's, Lenore
    Poet's Notes:
    Robert J. Lindley, 10-13-2020
    Rhyme, ( And In Death Her Youth And Her Beauty Vanished )
    (1.)
    Note-
    This a heavy-handed rewrite of an old poem that I first wrote,
    back in 1979..
    (2.)
    Note-
    Reference, Poe's poem, "Lenore"-

    Lenore (poem)
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to navigationJump to search
    For the 1773 poem by Gottfried August Bürger, see Lenore (ballad).

    Illustration by Henry Sandham for an 1886 edition of the poem
    "Lenore" is a poem by the American author Edgar Allan Poe. It began as a different poem,
    "A Paean", and was not published as "Lenore" until 1843.

    The poem discusses proper decorum in the wake of the death of a young woman, described as "the queenliest dead that ever died so young". The poem concludes: "No dirge shall I upraise,/ But waft the angel on her flight with a paean of old days!" Lenore's fiancé, Guy de Vere, finds it inappropriate to "mourn" the dead; rather, one should celebrate their ascension to a new world. Unlike most of Poe's poems relating to dying women, "Lenore" implies the possibility of meeting in paradise.[1]

    The poem may have been Poe's way of dealing with the illness of his wife Virginia. The dead woman's name, however, may have been a reference to Poe's recently dead brother, William Henry Leonard Poe.[2] Poetically, the name Lenore emphasizes the letter "L" sound, a frequent device in Poe's female characters including "Annabel Lee", "Eulalie", and "Ulalume".[3]

    Major themes
    Death of a beautiful woman (see also "Annabel Lee", "Eulalie", "The Raven", "Ulalume"; in Poe's short stories, see also "Ligeia", Berenice", "Eleonora", "Morella").
    Publication history
    The poem was first published as part of an early collection in 1831 under the title "A Pćan". This early version was only 11 quatrains and the lines were spoken by a bereaved husband. The name "Lenore" was not included; it was not added until it was published as "Lenore" in February 1843 in The Pioneer, a periodical published by the poet and critic James Russell Lowell. Poe was paid $10 for this publication.[4] The poem had many revisions in Poe's lifetime. Its final form was published in the August 16, 1845, issue of the Broadway Journal while Poe was its editor.[5]

    The original version of the poem is so dissimilar from "Lenore" that it is often considered an entirely different poem. Both are usually collected separately in anthologies.[6]

    Lenore in other works
    A character by the name of Lenore, thought to be a deceased wife, is central to Poe's poem "The Raven" (1845).
    Roman Dirge made a comic book inspired by the poem, involving the comedic misadventures of Lenore, the Cute Little Dead Girl.
    Hikaru Utada's "Kremlin Dusk" makes a reference to Lenore, as well as other elements of Poe's works and even mentions Poe himself.
    References
    Kennedy, J. Gerald. Poe, Death, and the Life of Writing. Yale University Press, 1987: 69. ISBN 0-300-03773-2
    Silverman, Kenneth. Edgar A. Poe: Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance. Harper Perennial, 1991: 202–203. ISBN 0-06-092331-8
    Kopley, Richard and Kevin J. Hayes "Two verse masterworks: 'The Raven' and 'Ulalume'," as collected in The Cambridge Companion to Edgar Allan Poe, edited by Kevin J. Hayes. Cambridge University Press, 2002: 200. ISBN 0-521-79727-6
    Silverman, Kenneth. Edgar A. Poe: Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance. Harper Perennial, 1991: 201. ISBN 0-06-092331-8
    Sova, Dawn B. Edgar Allan Poe: A to Z. Checkmark Books, 2001: 130. ISBN 0-8160-4161-X
    Hoffman, Daniel. Poe Poe Poe Poe Poe Poe Poe. Louisiana State University Press, 1972: 68. ISBN 0-8071-2321-8
    External links
    The full text of Lenore at Wikisource
    The full text of A Pćan at Wikisource
    Media related to Lenore (1885) at Wikimedia Commons
    Full text at Baltimore Poe Society online
    Henry Sandham (illustrator). Lenore. Boston: Estes and Lauriat, 1886. Scanned color illustrated book, via Internet Archive.
    Lenore public domain audiobook at LibriVox
    ******************************************

    The Poet, The Pen, The Solemn Prayer,
    ("In Tribute To Edgar Allan Poe's, Lenore")


    He wrote and wrote tho' so very tired and weary
    in his weeping heart lurked many romantic quotes,
    such that set eyes to saddest glaze, growing teary
    from dreams and memory that sent old sails afloat
    ink cast to drive away sad-life once so dreary.

    Fervent hope, prayer would and could set a new score.
    Gift salvation, if heartbreak, divine help implores.

    Through windows paper gleamed, starlight onto white bled
    to the poet, alone on a midnight crusade,
    in dreaming soul, he and she were there and then wed
    together sworn to a future life to be made
    on heaven's shores, nights spent in their honeymoon bed.

    Fervent hope, prayer would and could set a new score.
    Gift salvation, if heartbreak, divine help implores.

    Now the sky grew dark, reality took its bite
    yes, turbulent misery- its blackest cloak threw,
    evil world's dark had its way, sent its greatest blight
    and her soul into its afterlife's abyss drew
    weeping poet woke to sorrow's depths and death's plight.

    Fervent hope, prayer would and could set a new score.
    Gift salvation, if heartbreak, divine help implores.

    Love's sweetness the poet remembered from before,
    with pages wet, pen set about inking pleading words
    through past romantic love scenes his memory tore
    praising beauty of life, hope, singing of songbirds
    begging for life again with his love, his "Lenore".

    Fervent hope, prayer would and could set a new score.
    Gift salvation, if heartbreak, divine help implores.

    As moonlight onto paper cast radiant light
    and hope its greatest golden promise did so pour
    all her kisses, her touch and so very much more
    the poet wept as he, his deepest prayers did write
    of beauty, love, and a new life with his "Lenore".

    Fervent hope, prayer would and could set a new score.
    Gift salvation, if heartbreak, divine help implores.

    With ink dried, he remembering oaths they both swore
    as morn sang to dawn, there crossing dew-wetted grass
    as if on a cloud floating from another shore
    a life reborn, beauty given another pass
    came the poet's answer, his beloved "Lenore".

    Fervent hope, prayer would and did set a new score.
    Salvation, the poet did- divine help implore.

    Robert J. Lindley, 10-13-2020
    Rhyme, ( And In Death Her Youth And Her Beauty Vanished )

    (1.)
    Note-
    This a heavy-handed rewrite of an old poem that I first wrote,
    back in 1979..


    (2.)
    Note-
    Reference, Poe's poem, "Lenore"-

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenore_(poem)


    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2020
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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    Quote
    "The best and most beautiful things in the world
    cannot be seen or even touched - they must be felt
    with the heart." -Helen Keller.


    *******

    Of Love, Beauty, Heart And Mankind's Eternal Quest

    Of earthen soil greater beauty was born
    glows glimmering in shades of darken night
    a soothing balm, for the broken forlorn
    sensual images gifting sweeter sight.
    Love's gems set to overcome sad in life
    art cast forth as if by the hands of God
    relief denying aching pains of strife
    illumination, wherever man trods.

    Of heart, humanity, Time's racing clock
    those hours, days, years, and ages of mortal breath
    life racing onward against each tick tock
    dreams born and died, life hoping against death.
    Truth, its precious treasures won and then lost
    all within grasp yet oft by Fate denied
    due to blindness and greed folly's high costs
    while far many wrap themselves in false pride.

    Of Aristotle, Socrates, wise words
    Lo! What of love, beauty some have forgot
    light and daring that brought us out of herds
    leaving behind darkness and utter rot.
    Wisdom born of accumulated light
    knowledge as was stored and later retaught
    that separates day's glow from black of night
    and often frees us from grave dangers fraught.

    Robert J. Lindley, 10-17-2020
    Rhyme, ( From heart to pen to paper, a poet's thoughts )



    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2020
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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  21. #1092
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyr-Ziu Saxnot View Post
    Quote
    "The best and most beautiful things in the world
    cannot be seen or even touched - they must be felt
    with the heart." -Helen Keller.


    *******

    Of Love, Beauty, Heart And Mankind's Eternal Quest

    Of earthen soil greater beauty was born
    glows glimmering in shades of darken night
    a soothing balm, for the broken forlorn
    sensual images gifting sweeter sight.
    Love's gems set to overcome sad in life
    art cast forth as if by the hands of God
    relief denying aching pains of strife
    illumination, wherever man trods.

    Of heart, humanity, Time's racing clock
    those hours, days, years, and ages of mortal breath
    life racing onward against each tick tock
    dreams born and died, life hoping against death.
    Truth, its precious treasures won and then lost
    all within grasp yet oft by Fate denied
    due to blindness and greed folly's high costs
    while far many wrap themselves in false pride.

    Of Aristotle, Socrates, wise words
    Lo! What of love, beauty some have forgot
    light and daring that brought us out of herds
    leaving behind darkness and utter rot.
    Wisdom born of accumulated light
    knowledge as was stored and later retaught
    that separates day's glow from black of night
    and often frees us from grave dangers fraught.

    Robert J. Lindley, 10-17-2020
    Rhyme, ( From heart to pen to paper, a poet's thoughts )



    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2020





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    That Which Within Art's Paradings, Imitates Life

    This beating heart once dwelt within a hidden place
    to preserve what I loved and could never replace
    in youth, I set my throne in purple-crested hills
    in forest's foliage where Nature overspills
    safer refuge, a child's most magnificent shield
    within that nether realm there my soul never yields.

    Dear are the gifts given we so blindly refuse.
    As always the same lies we rinse and then reuse.

    All this wicked world and all of its savage blades
    offered sanctuary in hideous parades
    yet in valiant spirit, I knew such was so wrong
    I refused, to join its repugnant bustling throngs
    decisions made, I have yet to ever regret
    those that youthful life and its wild-born journey set.

    Dear are the gifts given we so blindly refuse.
    As always the same lies we rinse and then reuse.

    Now I have survived, in my own time growing strong
    I changed my dreams but not ever my youthful song
    as time using its power delivered decay
    I fear neither its wrath nor its destructive way
    for life has taught me, we are but mere molded clay
    here today, only to be gone some future day.

    Dear are the gifts given we so blindly refuse.
    As always the same lies we rinse and then reuse.

    Robert J. Lindley, original Sept- 24th-1992
    edited, 10/17 2020. 10/18 2020...
    Rhyme, ( From Ancient Dead Stars Fly Death's Truest Signs )

    Syllables per line:
    0 12 12 12 12 12 12
    0 12 12
    0 12 12 12 12 12 12
    0 12 12
    0 12 12 12 12 12 12
    0 12 12
    Total number of syllables:288
    Total number of words:212

    Note:
    A straightjacket he refused to wear
    Claiming life is boring and so unfair
    Yet its colors are marvelously grand
    And its epic pains more than he could stand
    RJL, 1992...
    ****************
    "From a rainbow, he tore off a delicious piece,
    To eat its vanishing visionary release"
    Quote- RJL- 1992.


    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2020
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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    A Whisper, A Cry, A Horrendous Tormented Gasp

    I fight the invading plunge of darkness and cold
    on spinning world's fantasies, too many are sold
    brother warmth, I beg of thee abandon me not
    else I too shall fall into the abyss to rot
    you'd not believe my relief to see each new dawn
    imaginative awe of mother doe and fawn
    my soul into Nature's bounty sought to behold
    I that once rebelled against all I was then told.

    Within hope's infinite powers to save and heal.
    I beg forgiveness and her touch to again feel.

    Lo! This is my sheer terror, my greatest of fright
    that mind shall fail me and bring on eternal night
    in limitless void, I can never again write
    as I wander around starving in my blind plight
    Brother light, shine graciously to light my new path
    deliver me from my former self, darkness's wrath
    I bow now in sincerest humbleness to pray
    remove this evil, this blindness that blocks my way.

    Within hope's infinite powers to save and heal.
    I beg forgiveness and her touch to again feel.

    A whisper, a cry, a horrendous tormented gasp
    I bemoan beauty's hand I once held in my grasp
    her sweet comfort, her sensual touch, and her all
    I cry out but she answers not that pleading call
    To her, I write and bare my torn and aching soul
    as I beseech God in this abyss black as coal
    this day, this hour divine grace extend unto me
    that I may survive and life its joy again see.

    Within hope's infinite powers to save and heal.
    I beg forgiveness, and her touch to again feel.

    Robert J. Lindley, original Aug 8th, 1979
    edited 10-18 and 10-19-2020...
    Rhyme, ( The Plea Cast Into The Wailing Night Winds )
    When a dark pen finds its path to reveal and write...

    Syllables per line:
    12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12
    0 12 12
    0 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12
    0 12 12
    0 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12
    0 12 12
    Total number of syllables:360
    Total number of words:270


    Copyright © Robert Lindley | Year Posted 2020
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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