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Thread: A poem a day

  1. #721
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    Below is new poem by my great friend Winged Warrior-
    A 360 Reversible.... And a very , very good one I might add.
    I am humbly honored that in addition to giving tribute to Master Poe, he also gave creds to both my dear friend Victor and myself, along with our dark poetry......--Tyr



    By Winged Warrior

    Ravens and Castles


    Listen to poem:
    ...inspired by and in dedication to ~ Victor Buhagiar, Robert Lindley (my mentors) and the rest of the PoetrySoup Family...thank you for your kindness and support...

    A Tribute To Edgar Allan Poe... by ^WW^ Winged Warrior
    July.30.2019


    A Winged Warrior 360 Reversible...


    -Ravens and Castles-

    Morbid castles cobwebbed upon haunting hills,
    Horrid crawling cadavers of blood bring spills…
    Ravens cawing carousingly amidst nocturnal nights,
    Cravens surrounding lunatics of fanatical frights…

    Wizards and wands wandering of sunken dungeons,
    Lizards lashing longing of fecal flies flying luncheons…
    Spiders savoring creatures cocooning of appetites,
    Writers writing of winding roads amongst candlelights…

    Ghostly apparitions attending of masters chambered,
    Mostly hauntings of dead relatives dismembered…
    Thunder & lightening resonating through humid halls,
    Under feeling of spells and incantations bouncing walls…

    Pivoting pendulums balancing upon lethal life and death,
    Riveting raging rivers calming anticipating final breath…
    Wearing witches and warlocks of demons delirious dancing,
    Swearing sentinels before crimson maddening moon trancing.

    Background music by...
    Dark Magic Music-'Salems Secrets'
    Peter Gundry Composer




    Backward read...


    -Castles and Ravens-

    Hills haunting upon cobwebbed castles morbid,
    Spills bring blood of cadavers crawling horrid…
    Nights nocturnal amidst carousingly cawing ravens,
    Frights fanatical of lunatics surrounding cravens…

    Dungeons sunken of wandering wands and Wizards,
    Luncheons flying flies fecal of longing lashing lizards…
    Appetites of cocooning creatures savoring spiders,
    Candlelights amongst roads winding of writing writers…

    Chambered masters of attending apparitions ghostly,
    Dismembered relative’s dead of hauntings mostly…
    Halls humid through resonating lightening & thunder,
    Walls bouncing incantations and spells of feeling under…

    Death and life lethal upon balancing pendulums pivoting,
    Breath final anticipating calming rivers raging riveting…
    Dancing delirious demons of warlocks and witches wearing,
    Trancing moon maddening crimson before sentinels swearing.


    Background music by...
    'The Sealed Kingdom'
    Adrian Von Ziegler Composer


    (((THANK YOU, DEAR FRIENDS)))...To all who commented and to help make these verses, poem of the day...Thank you for your kindness and support...ps more to come lol...Winged Warrior ^WW^ )


    Copyright © Winged Warrior | Year Posted 2019
    Last edited by Tyr-Ziu Saxnot; 08-04-2019 at 05:05 AM.
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

  2. #722
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    The Waradgery Tribe
    by Dame Mary Gilmore

    Harried we were, and spent,
    broken and falling,
    ere as the cranes we went,
    crying and calling.

    Summer shall see the bird
    backward returning;
    never shall there be heard
    those, who went yearning.

    Emptied of us the land;
    ghostly our going;
    fallen like spears the hand
    dropped in the throwing.

    We are the lost who went,
    like the cranes, crying;
    hunted, lonely and spent
    broken and dying.

    **********************

    The First Thrush
    by Dame Mary Gilmore


    Though leaves have fallen long since,
    The wagtails flirt and flit,
    Glad in the morning sun;
    While, on the knotted quince,
    The dewdrops, pearled on it,
    Bead to a little run. . . .

    Soft as a breathing air
    There came a lovely sound
    Out of the branches bare;
    So rich it was, and round,
    Sense stood, in listening bound,
    Stilled to its sweetness there!
    It was the thrush's note,

    That seemed as though his heart
    On some loved thing did dote;
    As though he yearned apart,
    Knowing some hidden smart,
    Pain in the long sweet rote.

    There, as the spider hung
    Grey-breasted 'gainst the brown
    Skin of the quince, he sung
    A song that o'er the town,
    Rose up as though to crown
    The tree-tops whence it sprung.

    And now, it seems to me,
    That long full breath he drew,
    Like perfume shed on air,
    Still dwells within the tree,
    Though long ago he flew,
    And left it naked there.
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

  3. #723
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    The Valley of Unrest

    by Edgar Allan Poe
    (published 1845)



    Once it smiled a silent dell
    Where the people did not dwell;
    They had gone unto the wars,
    Trusting to the mild-eyed stars,
    Nightly, from their azure towers,
    To keep watch above the flowers,
    In the midst of which all day
    The red sun-light lazily lay.
    Now each visitor shall confess
    The sad valley's restlessness.
    Nothing there is motionless --
    Nothing save the airs that brood
    Over the magic solitude.
    Ah, by no wind are stirred those trees
    That palpitate like the chill seas
    Around the misty Hebrides!
    Ah, by no wind those clouds are driven
    That rustle through the unquiet Heaven
    Uneasily, from morn till even,
    Over the violets there that lie
    In myriad types of the human eye --
    Over the lilies there that wave
    And weep above a nameless grave!
    They wave: -- from out their fragrant tops
    Eternal dews come down in drops.
    They weep: -- from off their delicate stems
    Perennial tears descend in gems.
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

  4. #724
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    In Exile

    BY EMMA LAZARUS

    “Since that day till now our life is one unbroken paradise. We live a true brotherly life. Every evening after supper we take a seat under the mighty oak and sing our songs.”—Extract from a letter of a Russian refugee in Texas.


    Twilight is here, soft breezes bow the grass,
    Day's sounds of various toil break slowly off.
    The yoke-freed oxen low, the patient ass
    Dips his dry nostril in the cool, deep trough.
    Up from the prairie the tanned herdsmen pass
    With frothy pails, guiding with voices rough
    Their udder-lightened kine. Fresh smells of earth,
    The rich, black furrows of the glebe send forth.

    After the Southern day of heavy toil,
    How good to lie, with limbs relaxed, brows bare
    To evening's fan, and watch the smoke-wreaths coil
    Up from one's pipe-stem through the rayless air.
    So deem these unused tillers of the soil,
    Who stretched beneath the shadowing oak tree, stare
    Peacefully on the star-unfolding skies,
    And name their life unbroken paradise.

    The hounded stag that has escaped the pack,
    And pants at ease within a thick-leaved dell;
    The unimprisoned bird that finds the track
    Through sun-bathed space, to where his fellows dwell;
    The martyr, granted respite from the rack,
    The death-doomed victim pardoned from his cell,—
    Such only know the joy these exiles gain,—
    Life's sharpest rapture is surcease of pain.

    Strange faces theirs, wherethrough the Orient sun
    Gleams from the eyes and glows athwart the skin.
    Grave lines of studious thought and purpose run
    From curl-crowned forehead to dark-bearded chin.
    And over all the seal is stamped thereon
    Of anguish branded by a world of sin,
    In fire and blood through ages on their name,
    Their seal of glory and the Gentiles' shame.

    Freedom to love the law that Moses brought,
    To sing the songs of David, and to think
    The thoughts Gabirol to Spinoza taught,
    Freedom to dig the common earth, to drink
    The universal air—for this they sought
    Refuge o'er wave and continent, to link
    Egypt with Texas in their mystic chain,
    And truth's perpetual lamp forbid to wane.

    Hark! through the quiet evening air, their song
    Floats forth with wild sweet rhythm and glad refrain.
    They sing the conquest of the spirit strong,
    The soul that wrests the victory from pain;
    The noble joys of manhood that belong
    To comrades and to brothers. In their strain
    Rustle of palms and Eastern streams one hears,
    And the broad prairie melts in mist of tears.


    Source: Emma Lazarus: Selected Poems and Other Writings (2002)
    ************************************************** ***

    A truly talented and awe inspiring poet.....-Tyr
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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    Invictus: The Unconquerable
    Out of the night that covers me,
    Black as the Pit from pole to pole,
    I thank whatever gods may be
    For my unconquerable soul.

    In the fell clutch of circumstance
    I have not winced nor cried aloud,
    Under the bludgeonings of chance
    My head is bloody, but unbowed.

    Beyond this place of wrath and tears
    Looms but the horror of the shade,
    And yet the menace of the years
    Finds, and shall find me, unafraid.

    It matters not how strait the gate,
    How charged with punishments the scroll,
    I am the master of my fate:
    I am the captain of my soul.



    This oft anthologised, oft quoted, oft hated poem is
    sometimes published with the first line as title and so it is listed here in that fashion.
    It is also sometimes known as I. T. R M. Hamilton Bruce since, after Bruce's death, Henley had those words added to subsequent publications of this poem.
    'Invicitus' is sweeping; passionate; larger than life in a way that few modern poems can get away with. It is also an oft quoted poem, lines of it having almost passed into the language. While these are invariably the ones that involve hurling defiance into the teeth of the storm, note that the poem itself hinges just as strongly on the 'storm' itself. It is the tension between the strongly contrastive elements that raises 'Invicitus' from a series of platitudes to a great poem.
    © by owner. provided at no charge for educational purposes
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

  6. #726
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    Chetan Patil, Poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen !


    The impossible Dream
    ---The Poem Of La Mancha


    To dream the impossible dream..
    To fight the unbeatable foe..
    To bear the unbearable sorrow..
    To run where the brave dare not to go..
    To love the pure and chest from a far..
    To right the unforgivable wrong..
    To try when your arms are too weary..
    To reach that unreachable star..

    This is my quest.. to follow that star..
    No matter how place.. no matter how far..
    To fight for the right..
    without questions.. without pause..

    To be willing to march into hell..
    For heavenly cause....
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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  8. #727
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    De Profundis
    by Elizabeth Barrett Browning


    I

    The face, which, duly as the sun,
    Rose up for me with life begun,
    To mark all bright hours of the day
    With hourly love, is dimmed away—
    And yet my days go on, go on.


    II

    The tongue which, like a stream, could run
    Smooth music from the roughest stone,
    And every morning with ' Good day'
    Make each day good, is hushed away,
    And yet my days go on, go on.


    III

    The heart which, like a staff, was one
    For mine to lean and rest upon,
    The strongest on the longest day
    With steadfast love, is caught away,
    And yet my days go on, go on.


    IV

    And cold before my summer's done,
    And deaf in Nature's general tune,
    And fallen too low for special fear,
    And here, with hope no longer here,
    While the tears drop, my days go on.


    V

    The world goes whispering to its own,
    ‘This anguish pierces to the bone;’
    And tender friends go sighing round,
    ‘What love can ever cure this wound ?'
    My days go on, my days go on.


    VI

    The past rolls forward on the sun
    And makes all night.
    O dreams begun,
    Not to be ended! Ended bliss,
    And life that will not end in this!
    My days go on, my days go on.


    VII

    Breath freezes on my lips to moan:
    As one alone, once not alone,
    I sit and knock at Nature's door,
    Heart-bare, heart-hungry, very poor,
    Whose desolated days go on.


    VIII

    I knock and cry, —Undone, undone!
    Is there no help, no comfort, —none?
    No gleaning in the wide wheat plains
    Where others drive their loaded wains?
    My vacant days go on, go on.


    IX

    This Nature, though the snows be down,
    Thinks kindly of the bird of June:
    The little red hip on the tree
    Is ripe for such.
    What is for me,
    Whose days so winterly go on?

    X

    No bird am I, to sing in June,
    And dare not ask an equal boon.

    Good nests and berries red are Nature's
    To give away to better creatures, —
    And yet my days go on, go on.


    XI

    I ask less kindness to be done, —
    Only to loose these pilgrim shoon,
    (Too early worn and grimed) with sweet
    Cool deadly touch to these tired feet.

    Till days go out which now go on.


    XII

    Only to lift the turf unmown
    From off the earth where it has grown,
    Some cubit-space, and say ‘Behold,
    Creep in, poor Heart, beneath that fold,
    Forgetting how the days go on.



    XIII

    What harm would that do? Green anon
    The sward would quicken, overshone
    By skies as blue; and crickets might
    Have leave to chirp there day and night
    While my new rest went on, went on.


    XIV

    From gracious Nature have I won
    Such liberal bounty? may I run
    So, lizard-like, within her side,
    And there be safe, who now am tried
    By days that painfully go on?

    XV

    —A Voice reproves me thereupon,
    More sweet than Nature's when the drone
    Of bees is sweetest, and more deep
    Than when the rivers overleap
    The shuddering pines, and thunder on.


    XVI

    God's Voice, not Nature's! Night and noon
    He sits upon the great white throne
    And listens for the creatures' praise.

    What babble we of days and days?
    The Day-spring He, whose days go on.


    XVII

    He reigns above, He reigns alone;
    Systems burn out and have his throne;
    Fair mists of seraphs melt and fall
    Around Him, changeless amid all,
    Ancient of Days, whose days go on.


    XVIII

    He reigns below, He reigns alone,
    And, having life in love forgone
    Beneath the crown of sovran thorns,
    He reigns the Jealous God.
    Who mourns
    Or rules with Him, while days go on?

    XIX

    By anguish which made pale the sun,
    I hear Him charge his saints that none
    Among his creatures anywhere
    Blaspheme against Him with despair,
    However darkly days go on.


    XX

    Take from my head the thorn-wreath brown!
    No mortal grief deserves that crown.

    O supreme Love, chief misery,
    The sharp regalia are for Thee
    Whose days eternally go on!

    XXI

    For us, —whatever's undergone,
    Thou knowest, willest what is done,
    Grief may be joy misunderstood;
    Only the Good discerns the good.

    I trust Thee while my days go on.


    XXII

    Whatever's lost, it first was won;
    We will not struggle nor impugn.

    Perhaps the cup was broken here,
    That Heaven's new wine might show more clear.

    I praise Thee while my days go on.


    XXIII

    I praise Thee while my days go on;
    I love Thee while my days go on:
    Through dark and dearth, through fire and frost,
    With emptied arms and treasure lost,
    I thank Thee while my days go on.


    XXIV

    And having in thy life-depth thrown
    Being and suffering (which are one),
    As a child drops his pebble small
    Down some deep well, and hears it fall
    Smiling—so I.
    THY DAYS GO ON.
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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    The South
    BY EMMA LAZARUS
    Night, and beneath star-blazoned summer skies
    Behold the Spirit of the musky South,
    A creole with still-burning, languid eyes,
    Voluptuous limbs and incense-breathing mouth:
    Swathed in spun gauze is she,
    From fibres of her own anana tree.

    Within these sumptuous woods she lies at ease,
    By rich night-breezes, dewy cool, caressed:
    ’Twixt cypresses and slim palmetto trees,
    Like to the golden oriole’s hanging nest,
    Her airy hammock swings,
    And through the dark her mocking-bird yet sings.

    How beautiful she is! A tulip-wreath
    Twines round her shadowy, free-floating hair:
    Young, weary, passionate, and sad as death,
    Dark visions haunt for her the vacant air,
    While noiselessly she lies
    With lithe, lax, folded hands and heavy eyes.

    Full well knows she how wide and fair extend
    Her groves bright flowered, her tangled everglades,
    Majestic streams that indolently wend
    Through lush savanna or dense forest shades,
    Where the brown buzzard flies
    To broad bayous ’neath hazy-golden skies.

    Hers is the savage splendor of the swamp,
    With pomp of scarlet and of purple bloom,
    Where blow warm, furtive breezes faint and damp,
    Strange insects whir, and stalking bitterns boom—
    Where from stale waters dead
    Oft looms the great jawed alligator’s head.

    Her wealth, her beauty, and the blight on these,—
    Of all she is aware: luxuriant woods,
    Fresh, living, sunlit, in her dream she sees;
    And ever midst those verdant solitudes
    The soldier’s wooden cross,
    O’ergrown by creeping tendrils and rank moss.

    Was hers a dream of empire? was it sin?
    And is it well that all was borne in vain?
    She knows no more than one who slow doth win,
    After fierce fever, conscious life again,
    Too tired, too weak, too sad,
    By the new light to be or stirred or glad.

    From rich sea-islands fringing her green shore,
    From broad plantations where swart freemen bend
    Bronzed backs in willing labor, from her store
    Of golden fruit, from stream, from town, ascend
    Life-currents of pure health:
    Her aims shall be subserved with boundless wealth.

    Yet now how listless and how still she lies,
    Like some half-savage, dusky Indian queen,
    Rocked in her hammock ’neath her native skies,
    With the pathetic, passive, broken mien
    Of one who, sorely proved,
    Great-souled, hath suffered much and much hath loved!

    But look! along the wide-branched, dewy glade
    Glimmers the dawn: the light palmetto trees
    And cypresses reissue from the shade,
    And she hath wakened. Through clear air she sees
    The pledge, the brightening ray,
    And leaps from dreams to hail the coming day.

    Source: Emma Lazarus: Selected Poems and Other Writings (2002)
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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    Poets at Poetseers » 19th Century Poets
    19th Century Poets
    ” I am the daughter of Earth and Water,
    And the nursling of the Sky;
    I pass through the pores of the ocean and shores;
    I change, but I cannot die. “

    – Percy Shelley From: “The Cloud” 1820

    The early 19th Century saw the blossoming of the great Romantic poets such as Keats, Shelley and William Wordsworth. In America there was also a powerful movement of poets, loosely termed “Early American Poets” these included Emily Dickinson, Ralph Emerson and Walt Whitman. After the great Romantic poets the next generation of British Poets became associated with the Victorian age. To some extent they offered greater conformity of vision and were more likely to use Christian imagery but they were still influenced by powerful undercurrents of the Romantic movement. In fact the influence of Romanticism can be seen even in modern poets such as Gerard Manley Hopkins. Later poets of the twentieth century also acknowledged the influence of this creative period in poetry.

    In India Swami Vivekananda epitomised the revitalisation of Hindu culture. After centuries of decline under Muslim and then British rule Vivekananda powerfully called his countrymen to invoke the ancient universal and eternal ideals of Sanatana Dharma.

    British Poets in the 19th Century

    Emily Bronte(1818 – 1848)
    Elizabeth Browning (1806 – 1861)
    Robert Browning(1812-1889)
    John Clare (1793 – 1864)
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772 – 1834)
    John Keats (1795 -1821)
    Rudyard Kipling
    Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844 – 1889)
    Christina Rossetti (1830 -1894)
    Percy Shelley ( 1792 – 1822)
    Lord Tennyson (1809 -1892)
    William Wordsworth(1770 – 1850)
    American Poets in the 19th Century

    William Bryant (1794 – 1878 )
    Emily Dickinson (1830 – 1886)
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 – 1882)
    Henry Wordsworth Longfellow (1807 -1882)
    Henry David Thoreau (1817 – 1862)
    Walt Whitman(1819 – 1892)
    Robert Frost (1874-1963
    Indian Poets in the 19th Century

    Ramakrishna (1836 – 1886)
    Swami Vivekananda (1863 – 1902)
    Sarojini Naidu (1879 – 1949)
    Michael Madhusuda Dutt (b. 1824)
    Fikirchand
    Sufi Poets in the 19th Century

    Bibi Hayati (19th Century)
    European Poets

    St Teresa of Lisieux (1873-1896)
    Romain Rolland (1866-1944)
    W.B.Yeats (1865 – 1939)
    Oscar Wilde (1855 – 1900)

    ~

    19th Century Poets at Amazon.com

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    British Poets
    Victorian Poets
    The Romantic Poets
    Early American Poets
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    19th Century Poets at About

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    Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772 – 1834)


    Forbearance

    (Beareth all things.—1 Cor. xiii. 7.)
    Gently I took that which ungently came,
    And without scorn forgave :–Do thou the same.
    A wrong done to thee think a cat’s-eye spark
    Thou wouldst not see, were not thine own heart dark.
    Thine own keen sense of wrong that thirsts for sin,
    Fear that–the spark self-kindled from within,
    Which blown upon will blind thee with its glare,
    Or smother’d stifle thee with noisome air.
    Clap on the extinguisher, pull up the blinds,
    And soon the ventilated spirit finds
    Its natural daylight. If a foe have kenn’d,
    Or worse than foe, an alienated friend,
    A rib of dry rot in thy ship’s stout side,
    Think it God’s message, and in humble pride
    With heart of oak replace it ;–thine the gains–
    Give him the rotten timber for his pains !
    By: Samuel Taylor Coleridge

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    To Nature

    It may indeed be phantasy, when I
    Essay to draw from all created things
    Deep, heartfelt, inward joy that closely clings ;
    And trace in leaves and flowers that round me lie
    Lessons of love and earnest piety.
    So let it be ; and if the wide world rings
    In mock of this belief, it brings
    Nor fear, nor grief, nor vain perplexity.
    So will I build my altar in the fields,
    And the blue sky my fretted dome shall be,
    And the sweet fragrance that the wild flower yields
    Shall be the incense I will yield to Thee,
    Thee only God ! and thou shalt not despise
    Even me, the priest of this poor sacrifice

    By: Samuel Taylor Coleridge
    Last edited by Tyr-Ziu Saxnot; 10-11-2019 at 09:16 AM.
    18 U.S. Code § 2381-Treason Whoever, owing allegiance to the United States, levies war against them or adheres to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States or elsewhere, is guilty of treason and shall suffer death, or shall be imprisoned not less than five years and fined under this title but not less than $10,000; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States.

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