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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by aboutime View Post
    L.A. Agree totally. As for your question about the navy learning anything. I'd be willing to bet...NOBODY on that bridge was paying attention to their duties. There should be a mass COURT MARTIAL of the C.O. the OOD, and everyone on watch at the time.

    EVERY SAILOR who honestly cares about their safety at Sea these days should know. TOO MUCH DEPENDENCE ON ELECTRONICS VS WIDE AWAKE EYES ON THE BRIDGE means the difference between LIFE AND DEATH.
    SOMEBODY HAS TO BURN FOR THEIR LACK OF CONTROL.
    I actually don't get it, myself. As many watches as they have going at any given time, how can ALL miss a ship? Crap, you've got to be half-inventor to UA smoke and avoid them.
    GET OFF MY LAWN

  2. #17
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    Of the 7, one could have saved himself:

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/navy-sa...-or-die-trying

    Navy Sailor Could Have Saved Himself, Chose to Save His ‘Kids’ or Die Trying MICHAEL DALY

    06.20.17

    Gary Rehm, 37, called the sailors on the USS Fitzgerald his ‘kids.’ And when his kids were trapped after the collision with a container ship, he sacrificed himself to save them.


    As news spread through the rest of the 7th Fleet that seven sailors had perished when the USS Fitzgerald collided with a container ship, the crew of another hard-luck destroyer assembled on its stern.


    The USS Cole had lost 17 sailors to a terrorist bomb in 2000. The current crew gave tribute to their ill-fated comrades from Saturday’s collision by standing in formation in the shape of the digits 62, the hull number for the destroyer Fitzgerald.


    “Few words can express our sorrow for the loss of our USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) shipmates—a simple picture must try,” read the caption when the USS Cole—hull number DDG 67—posted the tribute photo on the 7th Fleet website on Sunday.

    ...

    The most senior of the seven, Gary Rehm, had his own particular word for these brothers/shipmates.


    “The sailors on the ship he called his kids,” his uncle Stanley Rehm Jr. told The Daily Beast. “He called them his kids.”


    And, by various accounts, Gary Rehm had saved at least 20 of them after the collision. He then went down to save more.


    “He said, ‘If my kids die, I’m going to die,’” the uncle said.


    Gary Rehm perished with the six others.


    “He could have walked away and been safe,” the uncle noted.

    ...
    “The greatness of America lies not in being more enlightened than any other nation, but rather in her ability to repair her faults.” De Tocqueville



  3. #18
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    Gross negligence, dereliction of duty, incompetence. Just a few words that come to mind. The container ship did a 180 turn 25 minutes before impact. More than enough time for our ship to avoid a the train wreck. The Captain is toast, as well be most all the bridge crew and many others. Sad we lost 7 sailors over a dumb thing such as this. I feel the Captain thought it was safe to relax the rules so far from land and got snake bit. Radar, eyes, totally asleep at the wheel.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon_forward View Post
    Gross negligence, dereliction of duty, incompetence. Just a few words that come to mind. The container ship did a 180 turn 25 minutes before impact. More than enough time for our ship to avoid a the train wreck. The Captain is toast, as well be most all the bridge crew and many others. Sad we lost 7 sailors over a dumb thing such as this. I feel the Captain thought it was safe to relax the rules so far from land and got snake bit. Radar, eyes, totally asleep at the wheel.
    Thanks for clearing that all up for us, Barnacle Bill. It'll save us that pesky Naval Board of Inquiry and any court-martial proceedings where the accused had Rights.

    We can skip straight to the hanging,
    Last edited by Gunny; 06-20-2017 at 11:24 PM.
    GET OFF MY LAWN

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kathianne View Post
    Of the 7, one could have saved himself:

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/navy-sa...-or-die-trying
    More, this man was the hero, no matter the cause of the collision:

    http://hotair.com/archives/2017/06/2...ss-fitzgerald/


    ...

    That’s a somewhat antiseptic description, particularly for those without experience on naval vessels. As I described in my previous article, a warship at sea experiencing either fire or flooding conditions results in an environment below decks which is as close as you’ll likely come to hell on Earth. It’s cramped, frequently dark and the sounds, smells and sights can be overpowering. When there is flooding taking place, the immediate, imperative goal is to stop the water from entering the ship before she goes down taking all onboard with her.


    Petty Officer Rehm was someone who was up topside at one point as the emergency unfolded. He had “made it” to where there was fresh air and the chance to escape if the ship wound up foundering. He could have chosen to stay there. He could have bailed out. But he didn’t. He went back down below decks into that hellscape of flooding and blaring alarms to rescue his crewmates. He did so repeatedly, saving twenty of them. But his last trip to get the remaining men was one too many.


    During a flooding emergency as I described above there are a number of actions which the Damage Control (DC) team will attempt, depending on the conditions. There are patches which can be applied to the rupture in the hull, jammed into place even as the ocean is rushing in and stiffened with jacks. There are portable pumps which are rushed into the flooding compartments to try to evacuate the water as seals are established. But if all that fails there eventually comes a time when the order is given to “Set Zebra.” That’s your final line of defense. There are watertight bulkheads throughout the ship with hatches allowing the crew to cross from one area to the next. If you can’t stop the flooding at the hull, you locate the nearest watertight bulkheads and you close and dog down those hatches. You allow the spaces on the other side to flood in the interest of keeping the rest of the ship afloat. And yes, sometimes you have to follow that order even when there are living souls on the other side. It’s a question of saving the ship and the rest of the crew. You just do it.


    Petty Officer Rehm went repeatedly into that flooding zone to rescue his shipmates, obviously being aware that they could set Zebra at any time. They did, and he was on the wrong side of the bulkhead. A truly horrifying way to go, but he fought to save his crewmates to the very last. Few of us can contemplate what those final moments would have been like and we might all be left wondering if we ourselves could have found the inner strength to make that last trip as he did.


    Even though this was not an event which took place during battle, Petty Officer First Class Gary Leo Rehm Jr. sacrificed his life and died the death of a hero. His name should be added to the list of sailors who will have ships of the line named after them in the future. And a posthumous award for his unbelievable bravery, devotion and sacrifice would not be out of order. God Bless and rest in peace, Petty Officer Rehm. Few of us will ever match your mettle.
    “The greatness of America lies not in being more enlightened than any other nation, but rather in her ability to repair her faults.” De Tocqueville



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  7. #21
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    Got 20 guys out while risking his life. Gave up his life in continuing to try and help the rest. This man defines "hero" and would probably be the type and the first to say he wasn't.
    “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” ― Mahatma Gandhi

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  9. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon_forward View Post
    Gross negligence, dereliction of duty, incompetence. Just a few words that come to mind. The container ship did a 180 turn 25 minutes before impact. More than enough time for our ship to avoid a the train wreck. The Captain is toast, as well be most all the bridge crew and many others. Sad we lost 7 sailors over a dumb thing such as this. I feel the Captain thought it was safe to relax the rules so far from land and got snake bit. Radar, eyes, totally asleep at the wheel.

    Were you there? I have 30 years of navy life, 20 at sea, and I'll even admit we should wait to LEARN ALL OF THE DETAILS before condemning everyone. If you haven't stood a watch on a ship...On the Bridge; you are totally uninformed. In 1966, I was aboard the USS Lasalle LPD 3 in the Virginia Vacapes, at night, in foggy conditions, at about 10:00 p. m. So I know it can happen to anyone, at anytime. Everyone was fully awake, and special watches (LOOKOUTS) had been posted per the Captain's Night Orders. Which are a NAVY WIDE STANDARD at sea.
    For you to assume the Captain thought ANYTHING is nothing short of STUPID. Unless...you were there.
    Last edited by aboutime; 06-21-2017 at 07:19 PM.

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  11. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by aboutime View Post
    Were you there? I have 30 years of navy life, 20 at sea, and I'll even admit we should wait to LEARN ALL OF THE DETAILS before condemning everyone. If you haven't stood a watch on a ship...On the Bridge; you are totally uninformed. In 1966, I was aboard the USS Lasalle LPD 3 in the Virginia Vacapes, at night, in foggy conditions, at about 10:00 p. m. So I know it can happen to anyone, at anytime. Everyone was fully awake, and special watches (LOOKOUTS) had been posted per the Captain's Night Orders. Which are a NAVY WIDE STANDARD at sea.
    For you to assume the Captain thought ANYTHING is nothing short of STUPID. Unless...you were there.
    Not weighing in anything here on what happened, but it was my observation that nothing seemed to be what it looked like at sea. I knd of gave up trying to figure it out beyond being aware of our position from shore. We could be 10 miles out and it looked like we were just yards away.

    The Red Sea and the Straight of Hormuz were always the worst to me. It NEVER seemed like we were far enough away from Iran to suit me and I considered the Red a death trap. This one MM on the Peleilu got no end of delight in tormenting me.
    GET OFF MY LAWN

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