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Thread: Got my shot

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    Argument is moot when one's choice is dictated by the needs of others.
    Got my 1st shot. Feltike I was trying to catch the flu for a day. Arm celt like it had a deep bruise for several days. I've had worse.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunny View Post
    Argument is moot when one's choice is dictated by the needs of others.
    Got my 1st shot. Feltike I was trying to catch the flu for a day. Arm celt like it had a deep bruise for several days. I've had worse.
    I'm nervous as hell now for my 2nd shot on the 18th. Seems many got a reaction on the first shot and those that did were all similar, and those that did got a similar but worse reaction with the 2nd. So I'm going to bed that evening with 3 tylenol and 3 ibuprofen in my blood and maybe an oxycodone if I had one, and imitrex by my side along with other stuff.
    How do you catch a unique rabbit? Unique up on him! (was my Mom's favorite joke )

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimnyc View Post
    I'm nervous as hell now for my 2nd shot on the 18th. Seems many got a reaction on the first shot and those that did were all similar, and those that did got a similar but worse reaction with the 2nd. So I'm going to bed that evening with 3 tylenol and 3 ibuprofen in my blood and maybe an oxycodone if I had one, and imitrex by my side along with other stuff.
    Jim, research taking Ibuprofen first. I’ve heard not to take it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Abbey View Post
    Jim, research taking Ibuprofen first. I’ve heard not to take it.
    Really? I usually take Advil but as of late a monster bottle of ibuprofen from Amazon, and was Kirkland from Costco for awhile. (both generic and just cheaper). Had no idea it had anything negative about it, but gonna look it up. Yikes!
    How do you catch a unique rabbit? Unique up on him! (was my Mom's favorite joke )

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    So still have to dig in and read, but first search lead to a bunch of articles and here are just a few...


    11 reasons to avoid ibuprofen

    As if we needed another reason to question taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, a new study has concluded that taking these drugs increases the risk of cardiac arrest by a whopping 31 percent. A cardiac arrest is a serious medical emergency as the heart stops pumping blood throughout the body.

    The study was based on the analysis of 28,947 cardiac patients in Denmark, and was published in the European Heart Journal.

    “Our findings support the accumulating evidence of an unfavourable cardiovascular risk profile associated with use of the non-selective NSAIDs. This calls for special awareness in order to balance risks against benefits in treatment with NSAIDs,” the researchers concluded.

    Despite this and other warnings, NSAIDs remain the most commonly used and abused drugs, typically for pain. They are particularly dangerous because they are widely available over the counter and because their use is typically considered benign both by consumers and medical professionals. Thirty-three million Americans regularly use NSAIDs, with millions others worldwide. In fact, many people, especially athletes, include them in their daily routines the same way they do dietary supplements.

    But these drugs are far from benign. There are many common problems and side-effects associated with their use. In addition to increased cardiac risk, consider these other issues associated with the use of NSAIDs:

    • In addition to cardiac arrest, NSAIDs are associated with other heart issues such as increased risk of atrial fibrillation or heart flutter.
    • These drugs may delay healing.
    • NSAIDs disrupt the body’s own anti-inflammatory system. While reducing certain molecules responsible for inflammation, natural anti-inflammatory molecules also are impaired.
    • About 16,500 people annually die due to NSAIDs use. The culprit is usually ulcer-related complications associated with the drug’s continued use.
    • Intestinal problems, including bleeding, occur in almost everyone taking NSAIDs (even if it’s not noticeable). This can lead to anemia and fatigue.
    • Muscle dysfunction, contributing to physical aches and pains, and injuries is often prevalent among NSAIDs users.
    • NSAIDs can reduce the body’s ability to repair joint and bone stress.
    • Increased risk of kidney damage, especially when you’re dehydrated, can result from taking NSAIDs.
    • NSAIDs can disturb sleep.
    • Immune system stress often accompanies NSAIDs use.


    For certain, no injury or inflammatory condition is caused by a drug deficiency. Before reaching for a magic pill to cure your pain, consider the cause of the problem and seek out more natural choices for remedies, especially balancing fat and eating certain foods.

    https://philmaffetone.com/11-reasons-avoid-ibuprofen/


    DOCTORS TELL PEOPLE OVER 40 TO STOP TAKING IBUPROFEN! HERE’S WHY!

    ibuprofen FI
    DOCTORS TELL PEOPLE OVER 40 TO STOP TAKING IBUPROFEN! HERE’S WHY!
    FEATUREDHEALTH & LONGEVITYLIFESTYLEREMEDIESRESEARCHSAFETY 1
    When you’ve got a headache or back soreness, what do you do? If you’re like many Americans, you probably reach for a bottle of ibuprofen (trade name Advil).

    It can seem like a real elixir, taking away any trace of pain in a flash.

    But is it really safe?

    Don’t let the over-the-counter status of ibuprofen fool you. There are some real serious risks associated with even casual use of the drug.

    Of those risks, one of the most concerning is the potential for heart damage.

    Even The FDA Is Warning You

    Back in 2005, the FDA issued a warning about ibuprofen, saying it significantly increases one’s risk of heart attack or stroke. Well just last year, they made the decision to strengthen this warning.

    The FDA rarely does this. But after an extensive review of the drug, they issued they following statements:

    Even with short term use, one’s heart attack and stroke risk increase significantly.
    This risk increases the longer one continues to use ibuprofen.
    You do not need to have an existing heart condition to be at risk, although such a condition does increase your chances.
    These risks make ibuprofen especially dangerous to individuals over 40 – the age at which one’s risk of heart disease begins to skyrocket.

    Keep in mind that the FDA approves of some pretty terrible medications, but even they are raising a red flag when it comes to this over the counter drug.

    Don’t Be Misled
    The major problem with over-the-counter medications like ibuprofen – or acetaminophen, for that matter – is that people generally assume they pose no major risk.

    A prescription is seen as an indicator of seriousness. In its absence, most people just shrug and pop pills whenever they even think they need to.

    Hopefully the information I shared in this post changes your mind in that regard.

    Don’t worry – I’m not just going to leave you hanging without at least one alternative option for pain relief.

    Rest - https://www.davidwolfe.com/doctors-t...top-ibuprofen/


    Top Doctors Are Warning Anyone Over 40 To Stop Taking Ibuprofen Immediately. Here’s Why…

    https://dailyhealthpost.com/stop-taking-ibuprofen/
    How do you catch a unique rabbit? Unique up on him! (was my Mom's favorite joke )

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    ---

    Ibuprofen: 7 things you should know

    1. How it works

    • Ibuprofen helps to relieve pain and inflammation by blocking the effects of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. This prevents prostaglandin synthesis (prostaglandins elevate body temperature and make nerve endings more sensitive to pain transmission).
    • Ibuprofen belongs to a group of medicines known as NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs).


    2. Upsides

    • Effective for the relief of minor aches and pains due to arthritis, backache, the common cold, headache and migraine, menstruation, muscular aches, and toothache in adults.
    • Relieves minor aches and pain in children aged 6 months or older.
    • Temporarily relieves fever.
    • Does not cause dependence and is readily available at a low cost.
    • The incidence of stomach-related side effects is about half that seen with aspirin or indomethacin when ibuprofen is used at low dosages. However, this benefit is lost with higher dosages.
    • Available as tablets, capsules, chewable tablets, suspension, and in an injectable form.
    • Widely available over-the-counter.
    • Generic ibuprofen is available.


    3. Downsides

    If you are between the ages of 18 and 60, take no other medication or have no other medical conditions, side effects you are more likely to experience include:

    • Stomach-related side effects including indigestion, heartburn, and bleeding. People of an older age, taking other medicines that affect the stomach, or who drink more than 3 glasses of alcohol per day may be more at risk. Ibuprofen has one of the lowest risks of stomach-related side effects compared with other NSAIDs.
    • Most NSAIDs have been associated with an increased risk of stroke or heart attack. The risk may be higher in patients with pre-existing cardiovascular conditions and with dosages of ibuprofen greater than 1200mg per day.
    • May require three to four times daily dosing because of short duration of acton.
    • May not be suitable for some people including those with kidney disease, a history of stomach ulcers or other gastrointestinal disorders, with pre-existing cardiovascular disease, or following coronary artery bypass graft surgery.
    • May interact with some other medicines such as warfarin, SSRIs, ACE inhibitors, and diuretics.


    Note: In general, seniors or children, people with certain medical conditions (such as liver or kidney problems, heart disease, diabetes, seizures) or people who take other medications are more at risk of developing a wider range of side effects. View complete list of side effects

    4. Bottom Line

    Ibuprofen is effective for the short-term relief of minor aches and pains. Risk of stomach-related side effects is about half that seen with aspirin although the risk increases with higher dosages and a longer duration of use.

    5. Tips

    • Take with food or milk if stomach disturbances (such as indigestion) occur with use. See a doctor if these persist.
    • Always use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with the condition being treated.
    • If you are taking ibuprofen and find it is not working very well for you, you may like to try a different NSAID.
    • Response to different NSAIDs can vary so switching types (for example, from ibuprofen to naproxen) may improve response.
    • See a doctor immediately if you experience any difficulty with breathing, unexplained sickness or fatigue, loss of appetite, vision changes, fluid retention or abnormal bleeding.
    • NSAIDs should not be used in the last 3 months of pregnancy; ask your doctor before using any medication during pregnancy.
    • Avoid ibuprofen if you have a history of asthma or hives due to aspirin use or other NSAIDs, like naproxen.
    • Do not use this medicine if you have just had heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).


    6. Response and Effectiveness

    • Peak levels of ibuprofen are reached 1-2 hours after administration.
    • Equally effects COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes.


    7. Interactions

    Medicines that interact with ibuprofen may either decrease its effect, affect how long it works for, increase side effects, or have less of an effect when taken with ibuprofen. An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of the medications; however, sometimes it does. Speak to your doctor about how drug interactions should be managed.

    Common medications that may interact with ibuprofen include:

    • ACE inhibitors or ARBs, such as captopril, enalapril, or losartan
    • antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin or vancomycin
    • anticoagulants (blood thinners) such as apixaban, dabigatran, fondaparinux, heparin, or warfarin
    • antidepressants, such as citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, or paroxetine
    • antifungals, such as voriconazole
    • antiplatelets, such as clopidogrel or ticagrelor
    • beta-blockers, such as acebutolol, atenolol, bisoprolol, or carvedilol
    • bisphosphonates, such as alendronate
    • corticosteroids, such as dexamethasone or prednisone
    • digoxin
    • diuretics (water pills), such as chlorthalidone, chlorothiazide, hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), or furosemide
    • glucagon
    • haloperidol
    • HIV medications (eg, Stribild, tenofovir)
    • metformin
    • other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), such as celecoxib, diclofenac, etodolac, ketorolac, meloxicam, nabumetone, or naproxen
    • sulfonylureas (a type of diabetes medication), such as glimepiride, glyburide, or glipizide
    • supplements, such as glucosamine, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin E
    • others, such as cyclosporine, lithium, methotrexate, pemetrexed, pirfenidone, or tacrolimus.


    Drinking alcohol while taking ibuprofen may increase the risk of gastrointestinal-related side effects or kidney damage.

    Note that this list is not all-inclusive and includes only common medications that may interact with ibuprofen. You should refer to the prescribing information for ibuprofen for a complete list of interactions.

    https://www.drugs.com/tips/ibuprofen-patient-tips


    And then even though there is this - I still don't feeel comfy in this little time, so no more for me. Tylenol and Imitrex it is.

    Here’s What We Know About Ibuprofen and COVID-19

    • Experts say there’s no clear evidence that ibuprofen makes COVID-19 worse.
    • One thing specific to COVID-19 is that some lab experiments are showing that ibuprofen may boost the amount of ACE2 receptors that the virus uses to infect cells and could make the virus spread faster.
    • But that’s just theoretical.


    The World Health Organization (WHO) has changed its stance on taking ibuprofen if you have COVID-19, but people are still scratching their heads over what they should take if or when they contract the virus.

    After previously announcing that people with the virus shouldn’t take ibuprofen to treat pain and fever, the WHO now says they don’t advise against it.

    The flip-flopping has a lot of people confused — especially those stocking up on medication in anticipation of getting the virus.

    Dr. Otto O. Yang, a professor of medicine in the infectious diseases division at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, told Healthline there’s no evidence that ibuprofen causes worsening of COVID-19, “although there is circulating misinformation to that effect.”

    Fever (medication) frenzy

    The concern began after a study in The LancetTrusted Source stated that ibuprofen boosts the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which may facilitate and worsen COVID-19. As a result, WHO originally warned most patients to stick with acetaminophen, which is also known as paracetamol or Tylenol.

    Patients likely have increased ACE2 expression if they’re treated with ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II type I receptor blockers (ARBs), or thiazolidinediones, the report noted. Those drugs are commonly taken by those with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes. Ibuprofen can also increase ACE2, the study noted.

    Anti-inflammatory drugs and COVID-19

    The notion that anti-inflammatory drugs increase the risk of complications during fever or infection is “mostly theoretical,” Yang said.

    Medical experts debate whether or not reducing the inflammation that causes fever and muscle ache actually lowers the effectiveness of the immune response. On the flip side, patients who have worse symptoms may be more likely to take ibuprofen, and their outcome may have nothing to do with the medication itself.

    “There are some clinical observations of small numbers of patients that suggest ibuprofen could slow recoveryTrusted Source from bacterial pneumonias or make some viral infections like chickenpox more severe, but these aren’t careful prospective scientific studies,” Yang said.

    “Other publications have even argued that ibuprofen can be helpful in lung infectionsTrusted Source by reducing the amount of inflammation, which may be damaging to the lung,” he added.

    One thing specific to COVID-19 is that some lab experiments are showing that ibuprofen may boost the amount of ACE2 receptors that the virus uses to infect cells and could make the virus spread faster. But that is “purely theory that so far is not backed by clinical evidence in patients,” Yang said.

    It’s unclear if what has been seen in the lab translates to the clinic, Yang added.

    For example, ibuprofen may increase the ACE2 level in cells. “But that may be meaningless in a person if that increase is small, or if there is already so much receptor that adding more doesn’t matter,” Yang explained.

    Evidence lacking

    There’s not enough evidence to show that ibuprofen could make COVID-19 worse, Rodney E. Rohde, PhD, a professor at Texas State University, told Healthline.

    “I do not believe there is enough evidence due to a small sample size of patients,” he said. “However, if one is concerned, then they may want to avoid those drugs or drug families.”

    Rohde explained that ibuprofen is known to diminish the response of the body’s immune system. The inflammatory process is a vital component of the overall immune response, especially the second line of defense that triggers many third-line defense mechanisms, such as T and B cell responses, he said.

    For now, Rohde said there’s “no hard evidence” not to take over-the-counter or prescription pain medications. That said, Rohde advises people to talk to their doctors for more recommendations based on their individual health.

    As for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, it gave a statement to Healthline and suggested people reach out to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for updated COVID-19 treatment guidelines. “More research is needed to evaluate reports that ibuprofen and other over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs may affect the course of COVID-19,” it said.

    “Currently, there is no conclusive evidence that ibuprofen and other over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs increases the risk of serious complications or of acquiring the virus that causes COVID-19. There is also no conclusive evidence that taking over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs is harmful for other respiratory infections.”

    https://www.healthline.com/health-ne...n-and-covid-19
    How do you catch a unique rabbit? Unique up on him! (was my Mom's favorite joke )

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimnyc View Post
    I'm nervous as hell now for my 2nd shot on the 18th. Seems many got a reaction on the first shot and those that did were all similar, and those that did got a similar but worse reaction with the 2nd. So I'm going to bed that evening with 3 tylenol and 3 ibuprofen in my blood and maybe an oxycodone if I had one, and imitrex by my side along with other stuff.
    I keep hearing the 2nd shot is worse. Hair didn't start growing out of my palms with the first, so we'll see

    I take ibuprofen. The government warns you not take it but hands it out like candy because they won't give anything else that works. The government hates not controlling every aspect of our lives, to include pain, while abusers give the government every excuse to do so.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunny View Post
    I keep hearing the 2nd shot is worse. Hair didn't start growing out of my palms with the first, so we'll see

    I take ibuprofen. The government warns you not take it but hands it out like candy because they won't give anything else that works. The government hates not controlling every aspect of our lives, to include pain, while abusers give the government every excuse to do so.
    Just caught me off guard was all. I am forever taking tylenol and ibuprofen and even Aleve when others not around.
    How do you catch a unique rabbit? Unique up on him! (was my Mom's favorite joke )

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimnyc View Post
    Just caught me off guard was all. I am forever taking tylenol and ibuprofen and even Aleve when others not around.
    My Cardiologist told me to try to not take it ever since my heart attack. She didn’t strictly rule it out, but I take Tylenol for everything except a bad headache. Then I will still take a couple of Advil, as I HATE headaches.

    But I was referring strictly to taking it right before or after your shot, as I’d heard it reduces the efficacy of the shot.
    After the game, the king and the pawn go into the same box - Author unknown

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    I never take ibuprofen. Acetaminophen is my drug of choice for pain. Used it after surgery instead of painkillers.
    If the freedom of speech is taken away
    then dumb and silent we may be led,
    like sheep to the slaughter.


    George Washington (1732-1799) First President of the USA.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimnyc View Post
    So got my shot at 2pm...
    Mine today at 11:00. So far so good.
    "when socialism fails, blame capitalism and demand more socialism." - A friend
    "You know the difference between libs and right-wingers? Libs STFU when evidence refutes their false beliefs." - Another friend
    “Don't waste your time with explanations: people only hear what they want to hear.” - Paulo Coelho


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    Quote Originally Posted by fj1200 View Post
    Mine today at 11:00. So far so good.
    Fevers, etc., generally take at least 7 hours to manifest, but can take longer. Which version did you get?
    After the game, the king and the pawn go into the same box - Author unknown

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    Quote Originally Posted by Abbey View Post
    Fevers, etc., generally take at least 7 hours to manifest, but can take longer. Which version did you get?
    Pfizer. 6 hours and counting and all's well.

    For the shingles vaccine I only felt some side effects on the second dose and that was very short term. Hopefully no worse for this one.
    "when socialism fails, blame capitalism and demand more socialism." - A friend
    "You know the difference between libs and right-wingers? Libs STFU when evidence refutes their false beliefs." - Another friend
    “Don't waste your time with explanations: people only hear what they want to hear.” - Paulo Coelho


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    Quote Originally Posted by Abbey View Post
    Fevers, etc., generally take at least 7 hours to manifest, but can take longer. Which version did you get?
    That's how it was for me. I only had a vertigo/tunnel vision thing on and off from shot time til I went to bed and woke at like 4am in bad shape. I got my shot at 4pm, so ya see the timeline for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by fj1200 View Post
    Pfizer. 6 hours and counting and all's well.

    For the shingles vaccine I only felt some side effects on the second dose and that was very short term. Hopefully no worse for this one.
    Glad to see you survived! Now you're on the list like a few of us, wondering if we will be dead in 2 years or not.

    I got the flu a few times after the flu shot but nothing really lasting. No other reactions to anything. 'Cept this thing, leaving me wishing for death.
    How do you catch a unique rabbit? Unique up on him! (was my Mom's favorite joke )

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimnyc View Post
    ---

    Ibuprofen: 7 things you should know

    1. How it works

    • Ibuprofen helps to relieve pain and inflammation by blocking the effects of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. This prevents prostaglandin synthesis (prostaglandins elevate body temperature and make nerve endings more sensitive to pain transmission).
    • Ibuprofen belongs to a group of medicines known as NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs).


    2. Upsides

    • Effective for the relief of minor aches and pains due to arthritis, backache, the common cold, headache and migraine, menstruation, muscular aches, and toothache in adults.
    • Relieves minor aches and pain in children aged 6 months or older.
    • Temporarily relieves fever.
    • Does not cause dependence and is readily available at a low cost.
    • The incidence of stomach-related side effects is about half that seen with aspirin or indomethacin when ibuprofen is used at low dosages. However, this benefit is lost with higher dosages.
    • Available as tablets, capsules, chewable tablets, suspension, and in an injectable form.
    • Widely available over-the-counter.
    • Generic ibuprofen is available.


    3. Downsides

    If you are between the ages of 18 and 60, take no other medication or have no other medical conditions, side effects you are more likely to experience include:

    • Stomach-related side effects including indigestion, heartburn, and bleeding. People of an older age, taking other medicines that affect the stomach, or who drink more than 3 glasses of alcohol per day may be more at risk. Ibuprofen has one of the lowest risks of stomach-related side effects compared with other NSAIDs.
    • Most NSAIDs have been associated with an increased risk of stroke or heart attack. The risk may be higher in patients with pre-existing cardiovascular conditions and with dosages of ibuprofen greater than 1200mg per day.
    • May require three to four times daily dosing because of short duration of acton.
    • May not be suitable for some people including those with kidney disease, a history of stomach ulcers or other gastrointestinal disorders, with pre-existing cardiovascular disease, or following coronary artery bypass graft surgery.
    • May interact with some other medicines such as warfarin, SSRIs, ACE inhibitors, and diuretics.


    Note: In general, seniors or children, people with certain medical conditions (such as liver or kidney problems, heart disease, diabetes, seizures) or people who take other medications are more at risk of developing a wider range of side effects. View complete list of side effects

    4. Bottom Line

    Ibuprofen is effective for the short-term relief of minor aches and pains. Risk of stomach-related side effects is about half that seen with aspirin although the risk increases with higher dosages and a longer duration of use.

    5. Tips

    • Take with food or milk if stomach disturbances (such as indigestion) occur with use. See a doctor if these persist.
    • Always use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with the condition being treated.
    • If you are taking ibuprofen and find it is not working very well for you, you may like to try a different NSAID.
    • Response to different NSAIDs can vary so switching types (for example, from ibuprofen to naproxen) may improve response.
    • See a doctor immediately if you experience any difficulty with breathing, unexplained sickness or fatigue, loss of appetite, vision changes, fluid retention or abnormal bleeding.
    • NSAIDs should not be used in the last 3 months of pregnancy; ask your doctor before using any medication during pregnancy.
    • Avoid ibuprofen if you have a history of asthma or hives due to aspirin use or other NSAIDs, like naproxen.
    • Do not use this medicine if you have just had heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).


    6. Response and Effectiveness

    • Peak levels of ibuprofen are reached 1-2 hours after administration.
    • Equally effects COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes.


    7. Interactions

    Medicines that interact with ibuprofen may either decrease its effect, affect how long it works for, increase side effects, or have less of an effect when taken with ibuprofen. An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of the medications; however, sometimes it does. Speak to your doctor about how drug interactions should be managed.

    Common medications that may interact with ibuprofen include:

    • ACE inhibitors or ARBs, such as captopril, enalapril, or losartan
    • antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin or vancomycin
    • anticoagulants (blood thinners) such as apixaban, dabigatran, fondaparinux, heparin, or warfarin
    • antidepressants, such as citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, or paroxetine
    • antifungals, such as voriconazole
    • antiplatelets, such as clopidogrel or ticagrelor
    • beta-blockers, such as acebutolol, atenolol, bisoprolol, or carvedilol
    • bisphosphonates, such as alendronate
    • corticosteroids, such as dexamethasone or prednisone
    • digoxin
    • diuretics (water pills), such as chlorthalidone, chlorothiazide, hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), or furosemide
    • glucagon
    • haloperidol
    • HIV medications (eg, Stribild, tenofovir)
    • metformin
    • other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), such as celecoxib, diclofenac, etodolac, ketorolac, meloxicam, nabumetone, or naproxen
    • sulfonylureas (a type of diabetes medication), such as glimepiride, glyburide, or glipizide
    • supplements, such as glucosamine, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin E
    • others, such as cyclosporine, lithium, methotrexate, pemetrexed, pirfenidone, or tacrolimus.


    Drinking alcohol while taking ibuprofen may increase the risk of gastrointestinal-related side effects or kidney damage.

    Note that this list is not all-inclusive and includes only common medications that may interact with ibuprofen. You should refer to the prescribing information for ibuprofen for a complete list of interactions.

    https://www.drugs.com/tips/ibuprofen-patient-tips


    And then even though there is this - I still don't feeel comfy in this little time, so no more for me. Tylenol and Imitrex it is.

    Here’s What We Know About Ibuprofen and COVID-19

    • Experts say there’s no clear evidence that ibuprofen makes COVID-19 worse.
    • One thing specific to COVID-19 is that some lab experiments are showing that ibuprofen may boost the amount of ACE2 receptors that the virus uses to infect cells and could make the virus spread faster.
    • But that’s just theoretical.


    The World Health Organization (WHO) has changed its stance on taking ibuprofen if you have COVID-19, but people are still scratching their heads over what they should take if or when they contract the virus.

    After previously announcing that people with the virus shouldn’t take ibuprofen to treat pain and fever, the WHO now says they don’t advise against it.

    The flip-flopping has a lot of people confused — especially those stocking up on medication in anticipation of getting the virus.

    Dr. Otto O. Yang, a professor of medicine in the infectious diseases division at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, told Healthline there’s no evidence that ibuprofen causes worsening of COVID-19, “although there is circulating misinformation to that effect.”

    Fever (medication) frenzy

    The concern began after a study in The LancetTrusted Source stated that ibuprofen boosts the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which may facilitate and worsen COVID-19. As a result, WHO originally warned most patients to stick with acetaminophen, which is also known as paracetamol or Tylenol.

    Patients likely have increased ACE2 expression if they’re treated with ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II type I receptor blockers (ARBs), or thiazolidinediones, the report noted. Those drugs are commonly taken by those with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes. Ibuprofen can also increase ACE2, the study noted.

    Anti-inflammatory drugs and COVID-19

    The notion that anti-inflammatory drugs increase the risk of complications during fever or infection is “mostly theoretical,” Yang said.

    Medical experts debate whether or not reducing the inflammation that causes fever and muscle ache actually lowers the effectiveness of the immune response. On the flip side, patients who have worse symptoms may be more likely to take ibuprofen, and their outcome may have nothing to do with the medication itself.

    “There are some clinical observations of small numbers of patients that suggest ibuprofen could slow recoveryTrusted Source from bacterial pneumonias or make some viral infections like chickenpox more severe, but these aren’t careful prospective scientific studies,” Yang said.

    “Other publications have even argued that ibuprofen can be helpful in lung infectionsTrusted Source by reducing the amount of inflammation, which may be damaging to the lung,” he added.

    One thing specific to COVID-19 is that some lab experiments are showing that ibuprofen may boost the amount of ACE2 receptors that the virus uses to infect cells and could make the virus spread faster. But that is “purely theory that so far is not backed by clinical evidence in patients,” Yang said.

    It’s unclear if what has been seen in the lab translates to the clinic, Yang added.

    For example, ibuprofen may increase the ACE2 level in cells. “But that may be meaningless in a person if that increase is small, or if there is already so much receptor that adding more doesn’t matter,” Yang explained.

    Evidence lacking

    There’s not enough evidence to show that ibuprofen could make COVID-19 worse, Rodney E. Rohde, PhD, a professor at Texas State University, told Healthline.

    “I do not believe there is enough evidence due to a small sample size of patients,” he said. “However, if one is concerned, then they may want to avoid those drugs or drug families.”

    Rohde explained that ibuprofen is known to diminish the response of the body’s immune system. The inflammatory process is a vital component of the overall immune response, especially the second line of defense that triggers many third-line defense mechanisms, such as T and B cell responses, he said.

    For now, Rohde said there’s “no hard evidence” not to take over-the-counter or prescription pain medications. That said, Rohde advises people to talk to their doctors for more recommendations based on their individual health.

    As for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, it gave a statement to Healthline and suggested people reach out to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for updated COVID-19 treatment guidelines. “More research is needed to evaluate reports that ibuprofen and other over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs may affect the course of COVID-19,” it said.

    “Currently, there is no conclusive evidence that ibuprofen and other over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs increases the risk of serious complications or of acquiring the virus that causes COVID-19. There is also no conclusive evidence that taking over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs is harmful for other respiratory infections.”

    https://www.healthline.com/health-ne...n-and-covid-19
    It's a good thing that ibuprofen is not politically protected by lefties, otherwise you would not be able to find all this information on it. Especially not dissenting information.

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